Featured

My Educational Philosophy

by Dr. Pelham K. Mead III

My Educational Philosophy

By Dr. Pelham K. Mead III

Introduction

I have always believed in Dewey’s position on Education on “pragmatism” since I am a pragmatist. I believe in God and that he/she has a purpose for our lives.  Of the idea of God, Dewey said, “it denotes the unity of all ideal ends arousing us to desire and actions. 

I agree with Dewey that education and learning are social and interactive processes. Education or schooling is where a child spends 6 ½ hours a day. It becomes their social focus. Thus as Dewey has stated, the school itself is a social institution through which social reform can and should take place. It is also my firm belief that students do well in an environment in which they are allowed to experience things and interact with the curriculum. This is another tenet of Dewey, and still today we are striving to allow students to actively engage in their learning in lecture halls in colleges, and in classrooms in elementary and secondary education.

Being a pragmatic teacher I believe programs that arise in education can be worked out. I also believe in Existentialism in which students learn in their own way.  I believe students to be unique and no set curriculum will work unless it allows for their individualism to exist. Dewey believed, as do I that a teacher needs to model the right way of doing things and to prepare a student not only for the subject being taught, but also for the future where their values will continue.

Today, I received an e-mail letter from a student I had in my physical education classes and my Boys Gymnastics team over 40 years ago, thanking me for all I did for him. When I first saw the name, I had to think, “Who was this student.” Then it occurred to me it was one of my smallest gymnasts that I always gave encouragement to, that one day he would grow taller and become stronger. He never forgot that modeling, and even though it took 40 years, he finally thanked me. Thanks were not need because I was doing my job and then some. I was being not just a teacher or a leader but and adult role model, something which had stuck with this student even though after he graduated from high school I never saw him again.

Satisfactions and Challenges of the Teaching Profession

The satisfactions of teaching are when like the student just mentioned come back or contacts me and says thanks. I use to always get excited when my students who had graduated from high school would come back and tell me how they were doing in college and how gymnastics or physical education in knowing me made a difference for them. I recruited a great deal of students to the profession of teaching even at the young ages of 14, 15, and 16. When I saw that special talent in working unselfishly with others I knew this student would one day make a great teacher. I gave them opportunities to teach by becoming what I called Junior Instructors and when they went off to high school from Junior High, I asked them to come back and help me after-school in the gymnastic practice sessions. Soon after a few years I had over 30 Junior Instructors helping my gigantic team of 110 students. Out of the 30 students 19 went on to become teachers, which is quite a record. Many became Gymnastic Captains at their College teams. Three such students became Captains of the Springfield College Gymnastic Team, my Alma Mata. These successes were very satisfying rewards for me in my career in teaching.

There are always cons in all professions, however despite the politics of my school where I taught for 31 years, I managed to survive. We had three major strike threats in which our Union tried to force the Board of Education to give us at least a 3% pay increase every four years that was below the cost of living.

Student diversity seems to be a key word in today’s education, however when I started teaching I saw no diversity in having as many black students on my gymnastic team as white students. I did not see the difference between special students and normal students. I remember going out of my way to encourage a tall black student who was considered a   special education student to succeed in gymnastics when his friends all wanted him to play Basketball. My support of this student paid off because   he actually became a NY State Gymnastic finalist. After high school graduation he attended the local community college and started a Gymnastic Club there. He went on to transfer after two years to SUNY Cortland University where he became a star male gymnast. Even though he was a special education student with a reading level of second grade in eighth grade and being a black American in a generally “white” sport, he achieved. My major philosophy in my Gymnastic Exhibition Team was that everyone that kept up their attendance and show motivation and effort would participate in some way in all of our traveling gymnastic shows at other elementary and secondary schools in our district and later on in other school districts. If they weren’t good at tumbling, I put them in the parachute event. If they are too weak for the parallel bars or uneven parallel bars I made them a vaulter so they could be a part of the “Elephant Vaulting” event. (Vaulting over parallel bars with a mat laid over the rails using a springboard or trampolette, with me on the other side catching many of them as they cleared the mat.)

It never occurred to me that there was diversity of religious backgrounds, or ethnic backgrounds until my school had an International Day and I noticed that all of my students came from 21 different countries and spoke 21 different languages at home. In the 1960’s and the 1970’s my school district was 60% Jewish students from Spring Valley, Monsey, Pomona, and Montebello, NY. Monsey itself was a self-sufficient Ultra-orthodox Jewish community where Jewish people owned all of the stores, and all the schools were Jewish Yeshivas. By the 1980’s the population changed and Haitian students became the next population to move into Spring Valley bringing the overall Haitian student population to almost 40% by the end of the decade. Much of the liberal and conservative Jewish population moved out of Spring Valley to New City. Out diversity increased more and more each decade with an influx of different nationalities moving out of New York City to the suburbs where the schools were better than the city and housing was available for a cheaper amount. By the 1990’s the Indian population and the Russian population had become larger along with Chinese families. Our diversity became out strength as we struggled to learn from one another and to identify with the ethnic cultures that had moved into our community over 30+ years. Diversity was the keyword then as it is now and it meant treating students equally and fairly with sensitivity for their religious and ethnic cultural values.

Scope of my Teaching Profession

My first teaching experience other than my field-teaching placement was as a Graduate Teaching Fellow in Biology, Botany, and Anatomy at Springfield College. In my senior year I was fortunate to get a part-time position as a Teaching Fellow in Botany when another Teaching Fellow left suddenly. Because of this opportunity I stayed on as a Graduate Teaching Fellow in Botany and Zoology the next year. I was in charge of four Biology labs a week and had to teach once a month using 35 mm slides to a lecture hall of 350 Freshman Students. 

After a summer in Los Angeles as Assistant Director of the LA Board of Education “School Camp” experience at Point Fermin Park, I concluded my graduate field experience, and headed back to New York. I started teaching Physical Education and Health that fall of 1967 and Coach of Cross Country, Track and Field, and Assistant to the Wrestling coach. After one year of teaching Physical Education I realized the school was in the “ice age” when it came to Gymnastics.  The Men’s Physical Education staff had no clue what gymnastics really was as a sport. They called rope climbing and obstacle course-gymnastics.  I had to demonstrate everything and strive to up grade the equipment, which was 20 years out of date. After I developed an intramural gymnastics program for the boys that were too small to play basketball in the winter, I inherited the girls gymnastic program the second year of my job when the girl’s coach left for a college job. I knew nothing about Girls gymnastics since in the 1960’s and early 1970’s before the Federal Title 9 rule came into effect demanding equal programs and equipment for girls. I went to gymnastic clinics every year. I bought records for Floor Exercise, and read  books on Girls Gymnastics. I later became a Nationally Certified USGF Safety Gymnastic Instructor and Coach. I went on to pass the Men’s USGF National Judging test and was certified as a Men’s Gymnastic Judge for ten years.

My teaching experience was diverse in public school with 31 years at a Physical Education Teacher, Health Education teacher, Darkroom Photography Teacher, and Dean of Students for grades 7,8, and 9, called Junior High in New York State. I coached practically every sport that existed including Girls Softball but no Field Hockey. I coached French Foil fencing on a club basis and Lacrosse that was a new and upcoming sport at the time. I was supposed to be the Swimming Coach but the pool in my building was turned down by public vote and we never got a swimming pool and instead had to rent a college pool for the team to practice.

As I was retiring in 1998 the junior high system of education was being replaced by a Middle School concept of grades 6,7, and 8, leaving the 9th grade in High school where it belonged. In the 1970’s Physical Education which used to teach separate gender classes. Getting my Doctoral degree in 1992 opened a future door for me since I knew that I could not be a Physical Education Teacher forever and keep the same stamina and energy I had when I was younger. When I retired in 1998, it was just the beginning of another wonderful career in higher education where my Doctoral degree opened the doors to college and university jobs. My Dewey and James philosophy had stayed with me all my career and always made me reach out to the underdog, the underserved, the small the large, the slow and the fast students that came across my career path.

Responsibilities and Requirements of Teaching

My legal responsibilities as a teacher were “en loco parente,” in Latin, in place of the parent. It was my responsibility to prepare my lesson plans in advance, both for Health Education and Physical Education and have it approved by the Department Chairman. It was my job as a teacher and leader to present a moral presence to my students and to show them by my actions that act of kindness, good sportsmanship, good ethical values and fairness in judgment mattered both in school and in society.

My skills as a gymnast in high school and college gave me an edge in teaching Physical Education since most Physical Education teachers were poorly educated in Gymnastics and other minor sports like Fencing, Lacrosse, and Judo. These specialty areas made the difference between an average Physical Education teacher and a great Physical Education teacher. I found that in my first ten years on the job, I not only had to introduce real gymnastics to my colleagues, but I had to also educate other Physical Education teachers at the two high schools, the other two Junior High schools and the 13 elementary Schools. This opportunity came around once a year when we started off the year with the first Day of the year with the Superintendent’s Conference. I contacted several Olympic Gymnasts and one National Trampoline Expert that were employed by the Nissen Corp. and American Gymnastic Equipment Corp. as field reps and good will ambassadors. They came and put on demonstrations and clinics on three different occasions that sparked a lot of interest on the elementary school level in proper gymnastic progressions.

In 1975 I was asked to serve on the District-wide Curriculum Committee for Physical Education.  I had the opportunity to write the complete Gymnastic Curriculum from K-12 grade with the skills progressions that were appropriate for each age and skill level. Later on in 1982, I was again invited to join the combined Health and Physical Education Curriculum rewrite committee to meet State requirements that had changed in Health Education and Physical Education. Trampoline has been outlawed and dropped due to insurance rates and local Doctors lobbying to drop it. Health Education was fighting with the AIDS/HIV curriculum which little was known at the time and was changed each year beginning in 1985 until 1992. These curriculum writing experience would go on to help me later in my second career in higher education where I wrote curriculums for instructional technology in the classroom, and in software programs like Powerpoint, MS Publisher, Podcasting, Electronic Whiteboards, and Student Response clickers. Still to this day my concern for the social life of the student, their learning environment, and getting them to participate in their education as Dewey and James advocated so many decades ago.

Conclusion

In conclusion I have tried to demonstrate how my philosophy of life with the tenets of Dewey and James in mind, have helped me to be a good lifelong teacher. I have shown by example how I deal with diversity in students and how I have always attempted to treat every student equally and with sensitivity to their cultural and religious backgrounds. I have tried in my teaching career to model what a highly motivated person would be like. I have tried to demonstrate that I achieve above the norm and that I have always tried to do more than expected and more than anticipated by my peers and colleagues, as well as my students. Proudly I have always remembered my College’s motto “spirit, mind, and body.” Treat the whole person was the theme at Springfield College, former YMCA Training School and the college where Basketball and Volleyball were invented. In retrospect I have been fortunate to have had two teaching careers, one in the New York State Public school Secondary level for 31 years, and after retirement for 12 years of higher education experience at some of the best Universities in the Northeast; New York University, St. Johns University, the NY College of Osteopathic Medicine and the College of Mount Saint Vincent.

References

Alfred, A. (2010). Surviving the APA requirement. American Research Journal, 47 (2), 75-83.

Curz, M.J. & Smith, C.D. (2009).  APA format for dummies.  American Psychological

 Association Journal, 58.  Retrieved July 1, 2010, from Academic Search Premier.

Dewey, John,  “My Pedagogic Creed” (1897), “The School and Society “(1900), “The Child and the Curriculum,”  (1902), Democracy and Education, (1916) Experience and Education (1938).

Henniger, M.L. (2004).  The teaching experience:  An introduction to teaching.  Upper Saddle

River, NJ:  Pearson Education, Inc.

Henniger. M.L. (2008).  Educational philosophies and you. (Rev. ed.). Athens, OH:  Universal

Publications.

Longfield, J.A. (1997).  A survival guide for f200 students.  Retrieved July 1, 2010, from

http://www.iun.edu/~edujal/f200/survival.doc

James, William, “ Principles of Psychology (1890), “ Psychology: The Briefer Course,” (1892). A

Featured

Looking Back at the Title V federal grant at the College of Mount Saint Vincent, Riverdale, Bronx, New York 2001-2005.

by Dr. Pelham Mead III

A true story of a five year Title V federal grant at the College of Mount Saint Vincent, a small Catholic College in Riverdale, New York, 2001-2005.

Twenty years ago in May of 2001 I was hired as the Director of the Teacher Learning Center at the College of Mount Saint Vincent in Riverdale, New York, on the border of Westchester county and the Bronx on the Hudson River. The Associate Dean at the time interview me first and I was recommended by Sister Margaret who was the Department chairperson of the Education Department. Originally, the Fall before in 2000 I applied for a job as a Professor of Special Education and Sister Margaret passed my name along as a possible Director of the Title V, Hispanic Serving Institutions grant for 1.1 million dollars.

The Dean of Students previously wrote the Title V grant but when it was awarded she had taken a leave of absence to care for her son in Arizona who was in a car crash. She never returned, so the 160 page grant was never read by anyone in the College. President Richard Flynn was hired in January of 2001 and insisted that someone be hired to run the Title V grant project for five years. I was interviewed in April 2001 and after several interviews including a group interview of ten people and a final interview by the President. There was no Teacher Learning Center at the time and no office.

After I was hired there was no office for me to work in. I stayed a week in the Reading Center until they could find an office. A storage closet on the four floor of the Administration building was selected. At the time it was full of cabinets and had no desks or chairs.

My first job was to hire an office assistant. I was allowed to pick my own office assistant, so I chose a Cambodian woman who was in my Computer training class at BOCES of Nyack. Her name was Py Liv Sun. I selected her because she was a quick learner and hard worker. I needed someone I could trust and depend on to keep track of the purchase orders and financial records. Py Liv was a a perfect choice. She lived in Suffern, so she drove to my house in Nyack and left her car there and we drove in together to the College of Mount Saint Vincent for five years. Later on I hired a Teaching Assistant, Christine Servano, who was an outstanding student in my Adobe Photoshop course at BOCES.

My second big task was cleaning out the storage room so we could set up office for the new Teacher Learner Center. I called Facilities many times to remove the metal cabinets, but they never came. Py Liv and I moved the cabinets out ourselves leaving them in the hallway to be removed. Finally, Facilities removed them. Next we needed furniture, so we were told there was old furniture in the fifth floor attic we could take. There was only one elevator that went to the fifth floor attic. We found office chairs and several desks in the attic. I got a hand cart from the basement and Py Liv and I moved the tables and chairs down the elevator to our new office on the fourth floor.

The clean-up came next. The place was dusty and filthy. We had to scrub all the wall and the floor before we could sit in the office. Eventually, I got approval to hire someone to paint the walls to cover all the cracks and stains. The ceiling lights needed new bulbs and the windows needed caulking to fill the cracks. Finally, we settled in and I was able to order several computers to work with using Title V grant money. All expenses had to be approved by the College Provost before I could order anything. Our budget for the first year was $340,000 dollars. All of it had to be spent or our account would be red flagged. The grant called for five smart classrooms a year to be installed on the campus. I reached out to the VP of Finance and the Director of Facilities for help in finding classrooms to upgrade to Smart Classrooms, but I got no cooperation all summer of 2001. Every time I called the Director of Facilities he ducked out on me. For some reason he did not want to be involved in the Title V grant development.

I interviewed Professors that were still on campus in May and June of 2001 and found some supportive friends for technology. Professor Pat Grove in Biology was one of my biggest supporters and had previously pushed for technology at CMSV. Dean Bob Coleman in the Communications department was another great supporter. He told me the history of the College in relation to technology and the hiring of an outside agency to run the college computer and technology program at the cost of five million dollars. Sister Margaret was also a good friend in helping to get teachers to sign up for Instructional Technology tutoring with the Teacher Learner Center. Sue Apold was the Director of the Nursing Department at the time and she personally came down for instruction from me in the first year. I was able to help her Professors write two successful grants for the Nursing Department. Professor Kathy Flaherty won a Masters Degree plus certificate Nurse training program from the New York State Education department. I helped write all the technical specs for that program and helped teach Nurses with Master degrees who wanted a certificate to teach on the college level but did not want to take a Doctor degree to do so.

The second Nursing grant for $650,000. dollars was a technology Nursing grant from the Federal Office of Health. I had to install a MAC lab for that grant and train the teaching Professors how to use the MAC Computers. We converted two old unused classrooms into a computer lab. I helped file all the Assessment paperwork for the Nursing Professors and kept all their equipment up to date. They had to film or video tape lectures for future reference, so I filmed the lessons and showed the Professors how to use iMovie and Final Cut Pro edit the movies and see them to a server.

Back to the Teacher learner center. The Associate Dean who hired me ran the Reading center for students and was very popular, but not with the new President. He forced her to retire in a year and all of a sudden she was gone to Canada to retire. There were a lot of turnovers in the Administration especially at the VP of Finance and Comptroller positions. The VP of Finance had spent funds from the grant illegally and without permission of the new incoming President for a financial software program costing $60,000. I found about the expenditure when I did the first year Assessment report and realized that $60,000 was unaccounted for. With some research, Py Liv and I went through all the purchase orders prior to my being hired from the fall of 2000. Lo and behold we found monthly payments to a software program in Indiana and signed by the VP of Finance. I knew that being the new guy in administration I could not opposed the VP of Finance until I had more evidence. I was able to absorb the expense within the ten percent rule the first year, but eventually, I had to inform the President that the VP of Finance has spent $60,000 from the grant illegally before he or I were hired in the fall of 2000. The President confronted the VP of Finance with the copies of the purchase orders Py Liv and I found and he was fired. The Director of Facilities was also fired for refusin to cooperated with the Title V grant.

After a whole summer of planning and interviewing administrators and faculty I achieved no progress on constructing the five smart classrooms in the goals of the Title V grant, thanks to the lack of cooperation from the Director of Facilities. Finally, when all hope dimmed and the first year grant was about to expire on September 30, 2001, I went to the President and told him the Director of Facilities had blocked me all summer and prevented me from installing any smart classrooms as required by the Title V grant. I informed the President that if we did not install the smart classrooms and spent the money, we would lose the 1.1 million dollar grant from the US Department of Education. He was furious that the director was not cooperating. The President told me to do what ever it took to install the five smart classrooms that weekend before there grant expired. “Do whatever it takes,” he told me.So I hired a subcontractor that was a specialist in smart classroom installations for $25,000. Sister Mary Edward the administrator of the Biology building helped me renovate the Biology 90 seat lecture hall. We could not safely remove a giant ceiling projector without danger to the workers. Sister Mary Edward talked the college plumber, a devote Catholic, into climbing through the ceiling to reach the heavy projector and lower it down by rope to the floor. I was nervous he would get injured, but luckily all went well. Sister Mary Edward helped me plan the TV wall rack which had to be drilled through a brick wall to hold it up. We ran a LAN wire from the computer server closet for WAN access for computers. The chemistry counter was removed and an electronic giant movie screen was also installed. Sister Mary Edward got President Flynn to replace the broken plastic seats and new curtains for the faded and torn old curtains. It was a very successful smart classroom conversion thanks to her help and Professor Pat Grove.

Back in the administration building I chose rooms 410 and 412 and on the third floor 310 and 308 classrooms with fifteen foot ceilings. Room 410 had been started but never finished as a smart classroom previously. It had defective windows that were broken and cracked that had to be replaced. The LAN system was drilled through the floors to the server closet on the first floor. Later on as technology improved I installed portable wireless modems. Eventually, I copied the UCLA approach and had the wireless modems installed on the telephone poles in front of the Administration building. This saved thousands of dollars in not having to put a modem in every classroom.

I began installed year two smart classrooms the fall of 2002 to make sure we had plenty of time to do it right. Meanwhile, My first class of professors had started. The professors were too interested in what the other professors were doing than what they were learning. I had to scrap the classroom approach and switch to individual tutoring to custom design the instructional technology to each Professors needs and learning ability level. Each Professor got an hour a week for 14 weeks in which they received a stipend of $1600. This factor alone made the TLC program very popular. In addition I ordered Laptop computers to loan out to Professors to use for the semester. Most of the King brand desktop computers were broken and beyond repair in most Professor’s offices. The five million dollar fee for an outside company did not go very far. Being that I had access to funds and the Technology department did not, I was able to get their cooperation.

A third priority was to establish a TLC web site with online learning courses in Photoshop, MS Word, Powerpoint, and Access. I also taught podcasting and movie editing to advanced Professors. To keep the graduates of the TLC program active and involved, I offered monthly Grad dinners in which I brought homemade chili, Py liv brought Cambodian spring rolls and Christine brought Filipino Adobo Beef. The unique foreign meals were a big hit. I reported the TLC progress and offered lunch time catch up clinic in new programs.

Installing Blackboard was the next major priority. I had to learn the program from scratch and then teach it to all the faculty. It took help from Manhattan college to install the program. I then had to manually upload each professor’s classiest and teach them how to upload their syllabus and use the lockbox. I was the administrator for three years until Manhattan college hired a full time person.

The biggest and most difficult job was a costly installation of the Banner all-college system. Manhattan College again provided tech support. The cost of the modules was thousands o dollars and training was included for the student database, registrar, financial, admissions and accounting modules for staff. The installation was so expensive it had to be spread out over a couple of years. The Banner system completely replaced the previous Manhattan college and College of Mount Saint Vincent systems. It was a very complicated and expensive process.

Dressed up in my Columbia Doctor’s Robe for Graduation ceremonies at CMSV.

Year

Featured

My Years at the College of Mount Saint Vincent as Director of the Teacher learner Center and Coordinator of the Title V federal grant for 1.1 million.

Dr. Pelham Mead, Director of the College of Mount Saint Vincent Teacher Learning Center 2001-2005.
Dr. Pelham Mead at CMSV graduation with Sister Mary Edward Zipf, Sisters of Charity and Biology Professor.

The College of Mount Saint Vincent Biology Building 2002

The College of Mount Saint Vincent administrative building 2002.

Communications Department. Sister Pat

My hard working assistant Mrs. Py Liv Sun at the CMSV Teacher Learning Center 2002-2005.

Professor Kathy Flannigan, Nursing Professor.

The first Smart Classroom presentation in 2002 Fall, room 210.

Dr. Mead and Kathy relaxing at the monthly TLC graduate dinner at the College of Mount Saint Vincent. Kathy was one of the first Professors to complete the TLC tutoring program.

Christine Servano, my TLC teaching Assistant

Christine the TLC teaching assistant working with a Business Professor.

Professor Arlene Moliterno teaching in a Smart Classroom 2002.

Smart Classroom with electronic movie screen, TV mounted on the wall, overhead projector and LAN access with portable Laptop computer.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Py Liv Sun and Professor of Sociology 2003.

Dr. Pelham Mead attending College ceremonies in the fall of 2001.

Professor Pat Grove, Biology in her Office 2002.

The Biology Classroom 2002.

Christine TLC teaching assistant helps Professor Moliterno.

Professor Barbara Cohen, Nursing Graduate Professor 2002.

TLC Assistant Py Liv Sun and Christine Servano working at their desks in the Teacher learning lab 2001.

Newly renovated smart classroom -Biology Lecture hall, With the help of Sister Mary Edward, Biology administrator we completed the upgrade in September 2001. The old projector was taken down and a new $5,000 projector was installed. LAN access was installed and the Chemistry counter was removed. An electronic movie screen was installed and a 37 inch TV mounted through a brick wall to the right.

Dedicated Biology Professor.

Biology Department Chairperson in 2001.

Professor Jim working with students in Biology.

Dr. Green, Provost in 2001.

Professors Kathy and ….

Three female Professors at CMSV graduation in 2001.

Professor Fran and Sister Pat talking during the line up for Graduation 2001.

Director of the TLC- Dr. Pelham Mead and Professor Kathy.

Professor Arlene Moliterno, Teaching Professor at CMSV graduation 2001.

Dean of Communications, Bob Coleman, 2001.

Professor John, College Organist and Music Professor, graduate of TLC program using a Smart Classroom 2002.

Professor teaching in a new Smart Classroom 2002.

Sister Pat teaching in a smart classroom for Communications department. Notice the TV mounted in the background.

The Nursing Annex Smart Classroom. Previously a snack room. The floor was black from years of dirt. I had it sanded and resurfaced. The walls were cracked and had to be repaired. The overhead movie projector can be seen in this photo which was installed. The entire room was repainted after repairs. Outside the room a roof leak was also repaired. This room was a major unmaking but successful in the end.

Director of Nursing and Later VP, Susan at Graduation.
Professors at CMSV graduation 2001.

Bother, Professor of Communications 2001.

College of Mount Saint Vincent Castle seen through the trees.

Fran, Department Chairperson for Communications 2001.

CMSV department TV studio 2001 before the new one was installed in 2003.

Christmas party of 2001. Sister Mary Edward celebrating in Santa outfit.

Professors Celebrate at Christmas CMSV party 2001.

President Flynn and others sing at the Christmas Party 2001.

Dean Bob Coleman relaxes during the Christmas Party of 2001.

CMSV administration building from parking lot view.

Statutes in front of the CMSV library 2001.

Chapel of CMSV from the rear of the administration building.

The Business building under construction 2004. Maryvale was upgraded to a Fine Arts labs and Communication labs and classrooms, partially with Title V funds.

Maryvale construction. Before demolition.

Maryvale construction 2004-2005.

Front porch of Administration building. Before the old porch fell down, the Sisters of Charity had a porch going from end to end of the front of the administration building.

Another view of the administration building.

Maryvale construction pipes.

Sisters of Charity cemetery at the top of the hill.

Another view of the cemetery. All Nuns that taught or lived on the grounds and Priests are buried here.

Winter view of the great lawn from the Administration building.

2002 Spring View of Castle on the College of Mount Saint Vincent campus.

Winter view of Campus with Hudson river in the background.

Finished Maryvale 2005.

Road into the College of Mount Saint Vincent. 2002.

Gazebo on the back lawn behind the castle on the CMSB campus 2002.

CMSV auditorium and gymnasium building 2002 , spring.

Biology Building 2002.

Road to St. Vincent’s Point on the other side of the RR tracks on the shores of the Hudson river. Used to be a train station here in the old days.

Blackboard menu. Blackboard was installed by Title V and administered by Dr. Pelham Mead for three years until Manhattan College took over with a full time administrator.

Angel statute on campus.

Outdoor angel in the CMSV garden

Children praying to the Mother Mary.

Angel statute on campus

CMSV college logo

Female students exercise class at CMSV

Female CMSV students working out.

Exercise room at CMSV.

Fall leaf

Castle view from the administration building.

CMSV bell in the tower

Top of the administration building over the chapel.

Castle view.

Hudson river view looking toward the Tappan Zee bridge from the tower.

View from inside the bell tower on top of the administration building.

View of the road from the bell tower.

Administration building roof.

View from the roof.

Graduation Tent for 2002 goes up.

Stages of graduation tent going up on the great lawn. CMSV 2002.

Graduation tent covers the entire great lawn.

John, College Organist and Music teacher, Py Liv Sun and Christine Servano 2003.

Dr. Pelham Mead, Py Liv Sun, Christine Servano and Professor John.

College of Mount Saint Vincent chapel organ 2002.

College organist, John plays on the organ.

Organ view in chapel.

College organist John.

President Richard Flynn 2002 graduation.

Sister Mary Edward.

Faculty procession 2002 graduation.

Faculty procession 2002, Graduation.

Faculty entering Administration building.

Faculty leads student procession.

Student process in 2002 graduation at the College of Mount Saint Vincent.

Graduation 2002

castle door on CMSV campus

Faculty ascend platform.

Construction sign 2005 graduation

Faculty gather before graduation. Fran from Communications in background sitting.

Faculty graduation 2002.

Fran, Sister Pat and Brother chat.

Featured

The White Eyes and the Native Americans

By Dr. Pelham Mead

If you country was invaded by a foreigner what would you do? Fight back of course. Supposing the invader had superior weapons and you had only bows and arrows? Such was the plight of the American Native Indians. Who were the good guys and the bad guys? That depends on who you think had the right to wipe out entire nations of American Natives. The white eyes lied to the American Indians time after time. No wonder there was no trust.

Was the Native American Indian worse than the white eyes. Taking scalps was a tradition for Native Americans, but what about hanging a person from a rope in public until their neck broke or they choked to death.

Who killed hundreds of thousands of Buffalo? Not the Native American Indians, it was the white eyes with guns that could shoot rapidly. Buffalo skins had a great market value as well as horns.

Who held the white eyes accountable for their crimes against the Native American Nations? No one did. Killing Native American Indians was like a fox hunt where the fox had no chance in hell of surviving with hunting dogs chasing them down and men on horseback armed with rifles shooting at them.

So, a Few hundred years later the Native American Indian is treated as a minority with little or no rights. Look at Brazil how they do not let the Amazon Indians own land and have no more rights than a teenager.

When there is talk about reparations for the black slaves of America, think first about the white men who stole the land away from the Native Americans to begin with before the slaves were brought to America.

The Native American Nations had wonderful cultures and practices that are fading into the air over time. What can we do? Perhaps renew their status in the American culture and give them more support to get educated and become part of this great American society. Always remember the place in History the Great Chiefs and their Nations played in our history and the Wild West.

Why are there no national holidays that celebrate Native American Holidays?

Think about the Washington Redskins football team. Is Redskin really an insult?

Do we have any teams called the white eyes or the yellow skins? Think about it.

Are there any Polish poppers, or Irish hacks, or British cavaliers, or French Frogs?

Featured

New York College of Osteopathic Medicine

Learning Outcomes Assessment 2009-2010

January 2009

Taskforce Members

John R. McCarthy, Ed.D.

Pelham Mead, Ed.D.

Mary Ann Achziger, M.S.

Felicia Bruno, M.A.

Claire Bryant, Ph.D.

Leonard Goldstein, DDS, PH.D.

Abraham Jeger, Ph.D.

Rodika Zaika, M.S.

Ron Portanova, Ph.D.

Pre-

Doctoral

Data

Post-Graduate Data

Career

data

Pre-Matriculation

Table of Contents

OVERVIEW 4

I. Introduction and Rationale 5

II. Purpose and Design 9

III. Specifics of the Plan 11

Mission of NYCOM 11

Learning Outcomes 11

Compiling the Data 17

Stakeholders 17

IV. Plan Implementation 18

Next Steps 18

V. Conclusion 20

A. OUTCOME INDICATORS – DETAIL 24

1. Pre-matriculation data 24

Forms 26

2. Academic (pre-clinical) course-work 47

Forms – LDB / DPC Track 49

Forms – Institute for Clinical Competence (ICC) 55

3. Clinical Clerkship Evaluations / NBOME Subject Exams 86

Forms 88

4. Student feedback (assessment) of courses/Clinical clerkship

PDA project 92

Forms 94

5. COMLEX USA Level I, Level II CE & PE,

Level III data (NBOME) 120

6. Residency match rates and overall placement rate 121

2

7. Feedback from (AACOM) Graduation Questionnaire 122

Forms 123

8. Completion rates (post-doctoral programs) 142

9. Specialty certification and licensure 143

10. Career choices and geographic practice location 144

11. Alumni Survey 145

Forms 146

B. BENCHMARKS 151

Bibliography 152

Appendices: 153

Chart 1 Proposed Curriculum and Faculty Assessment Timeline

Institute for Clinical Competence:

Neurological Exam – Student Version Parts I & II

Taskforce Members

List of Tables and Figures

Figure 1 Cycle of Assessment 9

Figure 2 Outcome Assessment along the Continuum 15

Figure 3 Data Collection Phases 22

Table 1 Assessment Plan Guide 23

3

New York College of Osteopathic Medicine

Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan

February 2009

Overview

This document was developed by the NYCOM Task Force on Learning Outcomes

Assessment and was accepted by the dean in January 2009. Although a few of the assessment

tools and processes described in the document are new, most have been employed at NYCOM

since its inception to inform curriculum design and implementation and to gauge progress and

success in meeting the institution’s mission, goals and objectives.

The Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan documents the processes and measures used by

the institution to gauge student achievement and program (curricular) effectiveness. The results

of these activities are used by faculty to devise ways to improve student learning and by

administrators and other stakeholder groups to assess institutional effectiveness and inform

planning, decision-making, and resource allocation.

Certain of the measures described in later sections of this document constitute key

performance indicators for the institution, for which numerical goals have been set. Performance

on these measures has a significant effect on institutional planning and decision-making

regarding areas of investment and growth, program improvement, and policy.

4

Key performance indicators and benchmarks are summarized below and also on 􀁓􀁄􀁊􀁈 151

􀁒􀁉􀀃􀁗􀁋􀁈􀀃􀁓􀁏􀁄􀁑􀀑

Indicator Benchmarks

 Number of Applicants Maintain relative standing among Osteopathic Medical

Colleges

 Admissions Profile Maintain or improve current admissions profile based

on academic criteria (MCAT, GPA, Colleges attended

 Attrition 3% or less

 Remediation rate

(preclinical)

2% reduction per year

 COMLEX USA scores

(first-time pass rates,

mean scores)

Top quartile

 Students entering

OGME

Maintain or improve OGME placement

 Graduates entering

Primary Care careers

Maintain or improve Primary Care placement

 Career characteristics Regarding Licensure, Board Certification, Geographic

Practice, and Scholarly achievements–TBD

I. Introduction and Rationale

At NYCOM we believe it is our societal responsibility to monitor our students’ quality of

education through continual assessment of educational outcomes. On-going program evaluation

mandates longitudinal study (repeated observations over time) and the utilization of empirical

data based on a scientific methodology.

At Thomas Jefferson University, an innovative study was implemented circa 1970, which

was ultimately titled “Jefferson Longitudinal Study of Medical Education”.1 As a result of

implementation of this longitudinal study plan, Thomas Jefferson University was praised by the

1 Center for Research in Medical Education and Health Care: Jefferson Longitudinal Study of Medical Education,

Thomas Jefferson University, 2005.

5

Accreditation Team for the Middle States Commission on Higher Education for “…..their

academic interest in outcome data, responsiveness to faculty and department needs and the clear

use of data to modify the curriculum and teaching environment….their use of this data has

impacted many components of the curriculum, the learning environment, individual student

development, and program planning…” (TJU, 2005).

The Jefferson Longitudinal Study of Medical Education has been the most productive

longitudinal study of medical students and graduates of a single medical school. This study has

resulted in 155 publications in peer review journals. Many were presented before national or

international professional meetings prior to their publication (TJU, 2005).

According to Hernon and Dugan (2004), the pressure on higher education institutions to

prove accountability has moved beyond the acceptance and reliance of self-reports and anecdotal

evidence compiled during the self-regulatory accreditation process. It now encompasses an

increasing demand from a variety of constituencies to demonstrate institutional effectiveness by

focusing on quality measures, such as educational quality, and cost efficiencies.

Accountability focuses on results as institutions quantify or provide evidence that they are

meeting their stated mission, goals, and objectives. Institutional effectiveness is concerned, in

part, with measuring (Hernon and Dugan, 2004):

 Programmatic outcomes: such as applicant pool, retention rates, and graduation rates.

Such outcomes are institution-based and may be used to compare internal year-to-year

institutional performance and as comparative measures with other institutions.

 Student learning outcomes: oftentimes referred to as educational quality and concerned

with attributes and abilities, both cognitive and affective, which reflect how student

experiences at the institution supported their development as individuals. Students are

expected to demonstrate acquisition of specific knowledge and skills.

6

At NYCOM, we recognize that our effectiveness as an institution must ultimately be

assessed and expressed by evaluating our success in achieving our Mission in relation to the

following Outcomes:

1. Student Learning / Program Effectiveness

2. Research and Scholarly Output

3. Clinical Services

The present document focuses on #1, above, viz., Student Learning / Program Effectiveness.

That is, it is intended only as a Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan. At the same time, we are

cognizant that Institutional Effectiveness/Outcomes derive from numerous inputs, or “means” to

these “ends,” including:

1. Finances

2. Faculty Resources

3. Administrative Resources

4. Student Support Services

5. Clinical Facilities and Resources

6. Characteristics of the Physical Plant

7. Information Technology Resources

8. Library Resources

We believe it is our obligation to continually assess the impact of any changes in the inputs,

processes, and outputs of this institution.

The evaluation approach in this Assessment Plan provides for on-going data collection

and analysis targeted specifically at assessing outcomes of student achievement and program

effectiveness (educational quality). Assessment of achievement and program effectiveness is

based on objective, quantifiable information (data).

As a result of the NYCOM Learning Outcome Assessment Plan’s continual assessment

cycle, the report is available, with scheduled updates, as a resource in the decision-making

process.

7

The report provides outcomes data, recommendations, and suggestions intended to inform key

policy makers and stakeholders2 of areas of growth and/or improvement, together with proposed

changes to policy that strengthen both overall assessment and data-driven efforts to improve

student learning.

2 NYCOM Administration, academic committees, faculty, potential researchers, and students.

8

II. Purpose and Design

Well-designed plans for assessing student learning outcomes link learning outcomes,

measures, data analysis, and action planning in a continuous cycle of improvement illustrated

below.

Figure 1 Cycle of Assessment

Ten principles guide the specifics of NYCOM’s Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan:

1. The plan provides formative and summative assessment of student learning.3

2. The primary purpose for assessing outcomes is to improve student learning.

3. Developing and revising an assessment plan is a long-term, dynamic, and collaborative

process.

4. Assessments use the most reliable and valid instruments available.

3 Examples of the former include post-course roundtable discussions, Institute for Clinical Competence (ICC)

seminars, and data from the Course/Faculty Assessment Program. Examples of the latter include the AACOM

Graduation Questionnaire, COMLEX scores, NBOME subject exam scores, and clerkship evaluations.

Define

intended

Learning

Outcomes

Identify

methods

of measuring

outcomes

Collect Data

Review results

and use to make

decisions

regarding program

improvement

Start

Here

9

5. Assessment priorities are grounded in NYCOM’s mission, goals, and learning outcomes.

6. The assessment involves a multi-method approach.

7. Assessment of student learning is separate from evaluation of faculty.

8. The primary benefit of assessment is the provision of evidence-based analysis to inform

decision-making concerning program revision and improvement and resource allocation.

9. The assessment plan must provide a substantive and sustainable mechanism for fulfilling

NYCOM’s responsibility to ensure the quality, rigor, and overall effectiveness of our

programs in educating competent and compassionate physicians.

10. The assessment plan yields valid measures of student outcomes that provide stakeholders

with relevant and timely data to make informed decisions on changes in curricular design,

implementation, program planning, and the overall learning environment.

Outcomes assessment is a continuous process of measuring institutional effectiveness

focusing on planning, determining, understanding, and improving student learning. At

NYCOM, we are mindful that an integral component of this assessment plan is to ensure that the

plan and the reporting process measures what it is intended to measure (student achievement and

program effectiveness).

10

III. Specifics of the Plan

The NYCOM assessment plan articulates eleven student learning outcomes, which are

linked to both the institutional mission and the osteopathic core competencies

Mission of NYCOM

The New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of the New York Institute of

Technology is committed to training osteopathic physicians for a lifetime of learning and

practice, based upon the integration of evidence-based knowledge, critical thinking and the tenets

of osteopathic principles and practice. The college is also committed to preparing osteopathic

physicians for careers in primary care, including health care in the inner city and rural

communities, as well as to the scholarly pursuit of new knowledge concerning health and

disease. NYCOM provides a continuum of educational experiences to its students, extending

through the clinical and post-graduate years of training. This continuum provides the future

osteopathic physician with the foundation necessary to maintain competence and compassion, as

well as the ability to better serve society through research, teaching, and leadership.

Learning Outcomes

The following eleven (11) Learning Outcomes that guide this plan stem from NYCOM’s mission

(above) and the osteopathic core competencies:

1. The Osteopathic Philosophy: Upon graduation, a student must possess the ability to

demonstrate the basic knowledge of Osteopathic philosophy and practice, as well as

Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment.

2. Medical Knowledge: A student must possess the ability to demonstrate medical

knowledge through passing of course tests, standardized tests of the NBOME, post-

11

course rotation tests, research activities, presentations, and participation in directed

reading programs and/or journal clubs, and/or other evidence-based medicine activities.

3. Practice-based learning and improvement: Students must demonstrate their ability to

critically evaluate their methods of clinical practice, integrate evidence-based medicine

into patient care, show an understanding of research methods, and improve patient care

practices

4. Professionalism: Students must demonstrate knowledge of professional, ethical, legal,

practice management, and public health issues applicable to medical practice.

5. Systems-based practice: Students must demonstrate an understanding of health care

delivery systems, provide effective patient care and practice cost-effective medicine

within the system.

6. Patient Care: Students must demonstrate the ability to effectively treat patients and

provide medical care which incorporates the osteopathic philosophy, empathy, preventive

medicine education, and health promotion.

7. Communication skills: Students must demonstrate interpersonal and communication

skills with patients and other healthcare professionals, which enable them to establish and

maintain professional relationships with patients, families, and other healthcare providers.

8. Primary Care: Students will be prepared for careers in primary care, including health care

in the inner city, as well as rural communities.

9. Scholarly/Research Activities: Students will be prepared for the scholarly pursuit of new

knowledge concerning health and disease. Students in NYCOM’s 5-year Academic

Medicine Scholars Program will be prepared as academic physicians in order to address

12

this nation’s projected health care provider shortage and the resulting expansion of

medical school training facilities.

10. Global Medicine and Health policy: Students will be prepared to engage in global health

practice, policy, and the development of solutions to the world’s vital health problems.

11. Cultural Competence: Students will be prepared to deliver the highest quality medical

care, with the highest degree of compassion, understanding, and empathy toward cultural

differences in our global society.

The NYCOM assessment plan provides for analysis of learning outcomes for two

curricular tracks and four categories of student

NYCOM has historically tracked student data across the curriculum, paying particular

attention to cohorts of students (see below), as well as NYCOM’s two curricular tracks:

a) Lecture-Based Discussion track: integrates the biomedical and clinical sciences along

continuous didactic ‘threads’ delivered according to a systems based approach;

b) Doctor Patient Continuum track: a problem-based curriculum, whose cornerstone is

small-group, case-based learning.

Current data gathering incorporates tracking outcomes associated with several subcategories of

student (important to the institution) within the 4-year pre-doctoral curriculum and the 5-year

pre-doctoral Academic Medicine Scholars curriculum. The pre-doctoral populations are defined

according to the following subcategories:

 Traditional:4

 BS/DO: The BS/DO program is a combined baccalaureate/doctor of osteopathic

medicine program requiring successful completion of a total of 7 years (undergraduate, 3

years; osteopathic medical school, 4 years).

 MedPrep: A pre-matriculation program offering academic enrichment to facilitate the

acceptance of underrepresented minority and economically disadvantaged student

applicants.5

4 All other students not inclusive of BS/DO, MedPrep, and EPP defined cohorts.

5 The program is funded by the New York State Collegiate Science and Technology Entry Program and the

NYCOM Office of Equity and Opportunity Programs.

13

 EPP (Émigré Physician Program): A 4-year program, offered by NYCOM, to educate

émigré physicians to become DOs to enable them to continue their professional careers in

the U.S.

The NYCOM assessment plan includes data from four phases of the medical education

continuum (as illustrated in Figure 2 and Figure 3): pre-matriculation, the four-year predoctoral

curriculum6, post-graduation data, and careers and practice data

Within the NYCOM Learning Outcome Assessment Plan, the Task Force has chosen the

following outcome indicators for assessment of program effectiveness at different points in the

medical education continuum:

 Pre-matriculation data, including first-year student survey;

 Academic (pre-clinical) course-work (scores on exams, etc.) – attrition rate;

 Clinical Clerkship Evaluations (3rd/4th year) and NBOME Subject Exams;

 Student feedback (assessment) of courses and 3rd and 4th year clinical clerkships and

PDA-based Patient and Educational Activity Tracking;

 COMLEX USA Level I, Level II CE & PE, and Level III data, including:

o First-time and overall pass rates and mean scores;

o Comparison of NYCOM first time and overall pass rates and mean scores to

national rankings;

 Residency match rate and placement rate (AOA / NRMP);

 Feedback from AACOM Graduation Questionnaire;

 Completion rates of Post-Doctoral programs;

 Specialty certification and licensure;

 Career choices (practice type–academic, research, etc.);

 Geographic practice locations;

 Alumni survey.

The Outcome Indicators—Detail sections of this plan (􀁓􀁄􀁊􀁈􀁖 24 􀁗􀁋􀁕􀁒􀁘􀁊􀁋 150) show the various

data sources and include copies of the forms or survey questionnaires utilized in the data

gathering process.

The NYCOM assessment plan identifies specific sources of data for each phase

Figure 2 illustrates which of the above measures are most relevant at each phase of the medical

education continuum.

6 And the five-year pre-doctoral Academic Medicine Scholars program

14

15

16

The NYCOM assessment plan describes the collection and reporting of data,

responsibilities for analysis and dissemination, and the linkage to continuous program

improvement and institutional planning

Compiling the Data

Discussions with departmental leaders and deans confirmed that data gathering occurs at

various levels throughout the institution. Development of a central repository (centralized

database) facilitates data gathering, data mining and overall efficiency as it relates to data

analysis, report generation, and report dissemination. This includes utilization of internal

databases (internal to NYCOM) as well as interfacing with external organizations’ databases,

including the AOA (American Osteopathic Association), AACOM (American Association of

Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine), AMA (American Medical Association), and the ABMS

(American Board of Medical Specialties).

Stakeholders

Information from the data collection serves to inform NYCOM administration, relevant

faculty, appropriate research and academic/administrative committees, including the following:

 Curriculum Committee

 Student Progress Committee

 Admissions Committee

 Deans and Chairs Committee

 Clinical and Basic Science Chairs

 Research Advisory Group

 Academic Senate

The NYCOM assessment plan sets forth benchmarks, goals and standards of performance

The major elements of the plan are summarized in Table 1: Assessment Plan Guide:

Learning Outcomes/Metrics/Benchmarks found at the end of this chapter.

17

IV. Plan Implementation

As discussed earlier, most of the assessment tools and processes described in the

document have been employed at NYCOM since its inception to inform curriculum design and

implementation and to gauge progress and success in meeting the institution’s mission, goals and

objectives. Beginning in fall 2008, however, assessment efforts have been made more

systematic; policies, procedures, and accountabilities are now documented and more widely

disseminated.

The Office of Program Evaluation and Assessment (OPEA), reporting to the Associate

Dean for Academic Affairs is responsible for directing all aspects of plan refinement and

implementation.

Next steps

1. Develop a shared, central repository for pre-matriculation, pre-doctoral, and postgraduate

data (see Figure 3). Time Frame: Academic Year 2010-2011

Centralized database: Development of a (shared or central) repository

(database) utilized by internal departments of NYCOM. WEAVEonline is

a web-bases assessment system, utilized by numerous academic

institutions across the country, for assessment and planning purposes.

Utilizing this program facilitates centralization of data. The central

database is comprised of student data categorized as follows:

Pre-matriculation Data includes demographics, AACOM pre-matriculation survey, academic

data (GPA), and other admissions data (MCAT’s, etc.).

Data is categorized according to student cohort as previously written and

described (see item III. Specifics of the Plan on pages 13-14).

18

Pre-doctoral Data includes academic (pre-clinical) course work, course grades, end-ofyear

grade point averages, the newly implemented, innovative Course /

Faculty assessment program data (described in Section 4), ratings of

clinical clerkship performance, performance scores on COMLEX USA

Level I and Level II CE & PE, descriptors of changes in academic status

(attrition), and AACOM Graduation questionnaires.

Post-graduate/Career Data includes residency match rate, residency choice, hospitals of

residency, geographic location, chosen specialty, performance on

COMLEX Level III, geographic and specialty area(s) of practice

following graduation, licensure, board certification status, scholarly work,

professional activities/societies, faculty appointments, type(s) of practice

(academic, clinical, research).

This database supports and assimilates collaborative surveys utilized by

internal departments in order to capture requested data (see item III.

Specifics of the Plan on pages 13-14) essential for tracking students during

and after post-graduate training. Specific data (e.g., COMLEX Level III,

board certification, and licensure) is provided by external databases,

through periodic reporting means, or queries from NYCOM, therefore the

database provides for assimilation of this external data, in order to

incorporate into institutional reporting format.

2. Establish metrics. Time Frame: Academic Year 2010-2011

Benchmarks and Reporting: Conduct a retrospective data analysis in

order to establish baseline metrics (see Compiling the Data on page 17).

19

Following development of these metrics, institutional benchmarks are

established. Benchmarks align with Institutional Goals as written above.

Reporting of data analysis occurs on an annual basis. An annual

performance report is compiled from all survey data and external sources.

Timeframe for reporting is congruent with end of academic year. Updates

to report occur semi-annually, as additional (external) data is received.

Data reporting includes benchmarking against Institutional Goals

(mission), in order to provide projections around effectiveness of learning

environment, quality improvement indicators, long-range and strategic

planning processes, and cost analysis/budgetary considerations.

Report dissemination to key policy makers and stakeholders, as previously

identified (see Stakeholders on page 17) in addition to other staff, as

deemed appropriate for inclusion in the reporting of assessment analysis.

V. Conclusion

The impact on student learning of such things as changes in the demographics of medical school

applicants, admissions criteria, curricula, priorities, and methods of delivery of medical education

deserve careful discussion, planning, and analysis before, during, and after implementation. This

plan facilitates change management at three points:

o Planning, by providing evidence to support decision-making;

o Implementation, by establishing mechanisms for setting performance targets and

monitoring results, and

20

o Evaluation, by systematically measuring outcomes against goals and providing evidence

of whether the change has achieved its intended objectives.

At NYCOM, accountability is seen as both a requirement and a responsibility. As healthcare

delivery, pedagogy, and the science of medicine constantly change, monitoring the rigor and

effectiveness of the learning environment through assessment of student learning outcomes

throughout the medical education continuum becomes paramount.

21

Figure 3 Data Collection Phases

Pre-doctoral Data

Pre-matriculation

Data

Post-Graduate

Data

Career

Data

Assessment

Process

22

Learning Outcomes7 Data Collection Phases8 Assessment Methods Metrics9 Development of

benchmarks10

Students will:

Demonstrate basic knowledge of OPP

& OMT

Demonstrate medical knowledge

Demonstrate competency in practicebased

learning and improvement

Demonstrate professionalism and

ethical practice

Demonstrate an understanding of

health care delivery systems

Demonstrate the ability to effectively

treat patients

Demonstrate interpersonal and

communication skills

Be prepared for careers in primary

care

Be prepared for the scholarly pursuit

of new knowledge

Be prepared to engage in global

health practice, policy, and solutions

to world health problems

Be prepared to effectively interact

with people of diverse cultures and

deliver the highest quality of medical

care

• Pre-matriculation

• Pre-doctoral

• Post-graduate

• Career

• Didactic Academic

Performance

• LDB Curriculum

• DPC Curriculum

• Formative / Summative

Experiences: Patient

Simulations (SP’s /

Robotic)

• Student-driven Course,

Clerkship, and Faculty

Assessment

• Clinical Clerkship

Performance

• PDA-Based Patient and

Education Tracking

• Surveys

• Standardized Tests

• Alumni Feedback

Vis a Vis:

• Admissions Data

(Applicant Pool

demographics)

• Course Exams

• End-of-year pass rates

• Coursework

• Analysis of Residency

Trends Data

• Standardized Tests

Subject Exams

• COMLEX 1 & II Scores

• Analysis of Specialty

Choice

• Analysis of geographic

practice area

• Academic Attrition

rates

• Remediation rates

• Graduation and postgraduate

data

• External surveys

• Applicant Pool

• Admissions Profile

• Academic Attrition

rates

• Remediation rates

(pre-clinical years)

• COMLEX USA

Scores I & II (1st

time pass rate /

mean score)

• Number of

graduates entering

OGME programs

• Graduates entering

Primary Care (PC)11

• Career Data:

Licensure (within

3 years);

Board

Certification;

Geographic

Practice Area;

Scholarly

achievements

7 Complete detail of Learning Outcomes found in III., pages 11-13.

8 See Figure 3, page 22.

9 List of Metrics is not all-inclusive.

10 See complete detail of benchmarks—pages 5 & 151.

11 Primary Care: Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Pediatrics.

Table 1 – Assessment Plan Guide: Learning Outcomes / Data Sources / Metrics

23

Outcome Indicators – Detail

1. Pre-matriculation data

Data gathered prior to students entering NYCOM, and broken down by student

cohort, which includes the following:

Traditional, MedPrep, and BS/DO students

 AACOM pre-matriculation survey given to students;

 Total MCAT scores;

 Collegiate GPA (total GPA-including undergraduate/graduate);

 Science GPA;

 College(s) attended;

 Undergraduate degree (and graduate degree, if applicable;

 Gender,;

 Age;

 Ethnicity;

 State of residence;

 Pre-admission interview score.

Additional data is gathered on the MedPrep student cohort and incorporates the

following:

 Pre-matriculation lecture based exam and quiz scores;

 Pre-matriculation DPC (Doctor Patient Continuum) based facilitator assessment

scores and content exam scores;

24

 ICC (Institute for Clinical Competence) Professional Assessment Rating (PARS)

Scores.

Émigré Physician Program students

 TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score;

 EPP Pre-Matriculation Examination score;

 Medical school attended;

 Date of MD degree;

 Age;

 Ethnicity;

 Country of Origin.

25

Specific forms/questionnaires utilized to capture the above-detailed information include the

following:

 MedPrep 2008 Program Assessment

 MedPrep Grade Table

 NYCOM Admissions Interview Evaluation Form

 Application for Émigré Physicians Program (EPP)

 AACOM Pre-matriculation survey (first-year students)

 NYCOM Interview Evaluation Form – Émigré Physicians Program

Samples of the forms/questionnaires follow

26

MedPrep 2008 Program Assessment

Successful completion of the MedPrep Pre-Matriculation Program takes into consideration the

following 3 assessment components:

1. Lecture-Discussion Based (LDB)

2. DPC (Doctor Patient Continuum)

3. ICC (Institute for Clinical Competence)

A successful candidate must achieve a passing score for all 3 components. Strength in one

area will not compensate for weakness in another.

1. The first component assesses the Lecture-Discussion Based portion of the MedPrep Pre-

Matriculation Program. It is comprised of 3 multiple choice quizzes and 1 multiple choice exam.

 Histology

 Biochemistry

 Physiology

 Genetics

 Physiology

 OMM

 Pharmacology

 Pathology

 Microbiology

 Clinical Reasoning Skills

Each of the three quizzes constitutes 10% of an individuals overall LDB score and the final exam

(to be conducted on June 27) constitutes 70% of an individuals overall LDB score (comprising

100%) in the Lecture-Discussion portion of the program.

2. The second is based upon your performance in the DPC portion of the MedPrep Pre-

Matriculation Program. There will be a facilitator assessment (to be conducted on June 26),

which will comprise 30% of an individual’s grade and a final written assessment which will be

70% of an individual’s overall DPC score.

** Note – Both the Lecture-Discussion Based and DPC passing scores are calculated as

per NYCOM practice:

 Average (mean) minus one standard deviation

 Not to be lower than 65%

 Not to be higher than 70%

27

3. The third component is the ICC encounter designed to assess your Doctor Patient

Interpersonal skills. This assessment is evaluated on the PARS scale described to you in the

Doctor Patient Interpersonal Skills session on June 12, by Dr. Errichetti.

After the program ends, on June 27th, all three components of the assessment will be compiled

and reviewed by the MedPrep Committee. The director of admissions, who is a member of the

committee, will prepare notification letters that will be mailed to you within two weeks.

Please note:

The written communication you will receive ONLY contains acceptance information. NO

grades will be distributed. Exams or other assessments (with the exception of the Lecture-

Discussion Based quizzes, which have already been returned) will not be shared or returned.

Please DO NOT contact anyone at NYCOM requesting the status of your candidacy. No

information will be given on the phone or to students on campus.

Thank you for your participation in the MedPrep Pre-Marticulation Program. The faculty

and staff have been delighted to meet and work with you. We wish you success!

Sincerely,

Bonnie Granat

28

Last Name, First Name

Quiz #1

Score

(10% of

Overall

LDB

Score)

Quiz #2

Score

(10% of

Overall

LDB Score)

Quiz #3

Score

(10% of

Overall

LDB

Score)

LDB Final

Exam

Score

(70% of

Overall LDB

Score)

Overall LBD

Score

(Exam and

Quizzes

Combined)

Overall

DPC

Score

Overall

ICC

Score

29

NEW YORK COLLEGE OF OSTEOPAHTIC MEDICINE

ADMISSIONS INTERVIEW EVALUATION FORM

Applicant______________________________________________________ Date____/_____/____

CATEGORY

CRITERIA

VALUE

RATING

I. PERSONAL PRESENTATION

MATURITY

LIFE EXPERIENCE /TRAVEL

EXTRA CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES/HOBBIES

COMMUNICATION SKILLS

SELF ASSESSMENT (STRENGTHS/WEAKNESSES)

AACOMAS & SUPPLEMENTAL STATEMENT

50

II. OSTEOPATHIC MOTIVATION

KNOWLEDGE OF THE PROFESSION

TALKED TO A DO/LETTER FROM A DO

15

III. PRIMARY CARE MOTIVATION

INTEREST IN PRIMARY CARE

15

IV. OVERALL IMPRESSION

EXPOSURE TO MEDICINE

– VOLUNTEER EXPERIENCE

– EMPLOYMENT EXPERIENCE

– UNIQUE ACADEMIC EXPERIENCES

– RESEARCH

20

TOTAL RATING

100

OTHER COMMENTS: PLEASE USE OTHER SIDE

(REQUIRED)

INTERVIEWER:

Print

Name______________________________

Signed__________________________________________

30

Comments on Applicant _____________________________________________________

COMMENTS:

Interviewer_______________________________________

31

32

14. List all Colleges attended (Undergraduate, Graduate, Professional – US and Home Country) List in chronological order

Institution Name Location Dates of Major

Attendance Subject

Degree granted

or expected (Date)

Medical Specialty (if any) ___________________ No. of years in practice _________

15. Have you had any U.S. military experience ? Yes ( ) No ( )

If yes, was your discharge honorable? Yes ( ) No ( )

16. List employment in chronological order, beginning with your current position:

Title or Description Where Dates Level of Responsibility

17. Work/daytime telephone number________________________

area code phone

18. How do you plan to finance your NYCOM education? Personal funds ________ Loans

19. Were you ever the recipient of any action for unacceptable academic performance or conduct

violations (e.g. probation, dismissal, suspension, disqualification, etc.) by any

college or school? Yes ( ) No

If yes, were you ever denied readmission? Yes ( ) No

20. Have you ever been convicted of a misdemeanor or felony (excluding parking violations)? Yes ( ) No(

If your answer to #19 or #20 is yes, please explain fully:

21. Evaluation Service used: Globe Language Services ______ Joseph Silny & Assocs. ______

World Education Services ______ IERF _____

*22. TOEFL Score(s): ________________________________

*ALL CANDIDATES MUST TAKE TOEFL / TOEFL

Scores Cannot Be Older Than 2 YEARS

If you plan to take or retake the TOEFL, enter date: _____/_____/ mo.

yr.

(NYCOM’s TOEFL Code is #2486; copies cannot be accepted)

( )

( )

)

33

USMLE WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED IN LIEU OF TOEFL

All evaluations must be received directly from the evaluation service and are subject to approval by the New York

College of Osteopathic Medicine.

Personal Comments: Please discuss your reasons for applying to the EPP program.

Selection of candidates is competitive; achieving a minimum, passing TOEFL Score

does not automatically guarantee an interview.

I certify that all information submitted in support of my application is complete and correct to the best of my knowledge.

Date: Signature: ______________________________________

PLEASE MAIL APPLICATION AND FEE ($60.00 CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ONLY, PAYABLE TO NYCOM) TO:

New York College of Osteopathic Medicine

Of New York Institute of Technology

Office of Admissions/ Serota Academic Center Room 203

Northern Blvd.

Old Westbury, NY 11568-8000

34

35

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38

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40

41

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NEW YORK COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE

INTERVIEW EVALUATION FORM – É MIGRE PHYSICIANS PROGRAM

Applicant:___________________________________ Date:________________

State:___________________________

CATEGORY

CRITERIA TO BE

ADDRESSED VALUE RATING

1. Oral Comprehension

Ability to understand questions, content

30

2. Personal Presentation

Appropriate response, ability to relate to

interviewers

30

3. Verbal Expression

Clarity, articulation, use of

grammar

30

4. Overall Impression

Unique experiences, employment ,

research

10

OVERALL

RATING

100

INTERVIEWER RECOMMENDATION:

Accept_____________

Reject_____________

COMMENTS:______________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

NAME:_____________________________

SIGNED:____________________________

46

2. Academic (pre-clinical) course-work

Data captured during NYCOM’s pre-clinical 4-year pre-doctoral program and 5-year

Academic Medicine Scholars program which includes the following:

Curricular Tracks: Lecture Based-Discussion / Doctor Patient Continuum

 Pre-clinical course pass/failure rate as determined by class year (year 1 and year

2) and overall at end of year 2 (tracking each class and in aggregate for two

years);

 Failure rates of (components) Nervous System course or Behavior course;

 Course grades (H/P/F);

 Exam scores;

 Scores (pass/fail rate) on Core Clinical Competency OSCE exams;

 Professionalism Assessment Rating Scale (PARS)

 Students determined as pre-clinical course dismissals (and remediated);

 Students determined double course failure (and remediated);

 Failure rates due to cognitive and/or OMM lab portions of course

 Repeat students (aligned with Learning Specialist intervention)

 Changes in academic status (attrition-as identified above);

 End-of-year class rankings.

47

Specific forms/questionnaires utilized to capture the above-detailed information include the

following:

 Introduction to Osteopathic Medicine / Lecture-Based Discussion

 Doctor-Patient Continuum (DPC) – Biopsychosocial Sciences I

Grading and Evaluation Policy

 DPC – Clinical Sciences II – Grading Policy

 Assessing the AOA Core Competencies at NYCOM

 Institute for Clinical Competence (ICC) Professionalism Assessment

Rating Scale (PARS)

 SimCom-T(eam) Holistic Scoring Guide

 Case A – Dizziness, Acute (scoring guides)

Samples of the forms/questionnaires follow

48

Introduction to Osteopathic Medicine / Lecture-Based Discussion

Grading and Evaluation

1. At the conclusion of this course, students will receive a final cognitive score and a final OMM laboratory

score.

2. Both a student’s final cognitive score and a student’s final OMM laboratory score must be at a

passing level in order to pass this course.

3. Cognitive Score

a. A student’s cognitive score is comprised of the following two components:

i. Written Examinations and Quizzes pertaining to course lectures and corresponding

required readings, cases, course notes, and PowerPoint presentations

ii. Anatomy Laboratory Examinations and Quizzes

b. The weighting of the two components of the final cognitive score is as follows:

Summary of Cognitive Score Breakdown

Cognitive Score Component % of Final Cognitive Score

Written Examinations and Quizzes 75%

Anatomy Laboratory Examinations and

Quizzes

25%

Total Cognitive Score 100%

c. Written Examinations and Quizzes

i. There will be three written examinations and four written quizzes in this course.

ii. The written examinations and quizzes will consist of material from all three threads

(Cellular and Molecular Basis of Medicine, Structural and Functional Basis of Medicine,

Practice of Medicine).

iii. Up to 25% of the written exam and quiz material will come from directed readings.

iv. For the purpose of determining passing for this course, the written examinations will be

worth 90% of the final written score and the quizzes will be worth 10% (2.5% each) of the

final written score. This weighting is illustrated in the following table:

Summary of Written Exam/Quiz Score Breakdown

Written Exam/Quiz # % of Final Written Score

Written Exam #1 25%

Written Exam #2 30%

Written Exam #3 35%

Total Written Exam Score 90%

Written Quiz #1 2.5%

Written Quiz #2 2.5%

Written Quiz #3 2.5%

Written Quiz #4 2.5%

Total Written Quiz Score 10%

Total Written Score 100%

d. Anatomy Laboratory Examinations and Quizzes

i. There will be two Anatomy laboratory examinations in this course

ii. There will be Anatomy laboratory quizzes in this course, conducted during Anatomy

laboratory sessions.

iii. For the purpose of determining passing for this course, each Anatomy lab examination

49

will be worth 45% of students’ final Anatomy lab score and all Anatomy lab quizzes

combined will be worth 10% of students’ final Anatomy lab score. This weighting is

illustrated in the following table:

Summary of Anatomy Lab Exam/Quiz Score Breakdown

Anatomy Lab Exam/Quiz # % of Final Anatomy Score

Anatomy Lab Exam #1 45%

Anatomy Lab Exam #2 45%

Anatomy Lab Quizzes 10%

Total Anatomy Lab Exam/Quiz Score 100%

4. OMM Laboratory Score

a. A student’s OMM laboratory score in this course is comprised of an OMM laboratory examination

and laboratory quizzes, as follows:

i. There will be one OMM laboratory practical examination in this course

ii. There will be two OMM laboratory practical quizzes in this course conducted during OMM

laboratory sessions

iii. There will be a series of OMM laboratory written quizzes in this course conducted during

OMM laboratory sessions.

b. The weighting of the components of the OMM laboratory final score is as follows: For the purpose

of determining passing for this course, the OMM laboratory practical examination will be worth 70%

of the final OMM laboratory score, the OMM laboratory practical quizzes will be worth 20% (10%

each) of the final OMM laboratory score, and the OMM laboratory written quizzes will be worth 10%

(all OMM lab written quizzes combined) of the OMM laboratory score. This weighting is illustrated

in the following table:

Summary of OMM Laboratory Exam/Quiz Score Breakdown

OMM Laboratory Exam/Quiz % of Final OMM Laboratory Score

OMM Laboratory Practical Exam 70%

OMM Laboratory Practical Quiz #1 10%

OMM Laboratory Practical Quiz #2 10%

OMM Laboratory Written Quizzes (all quizzes

combined)

10%

Total OMM Laboratory Score 100%

5. Examinations and quizzes may be cumulative.

6. Honors Determination

a. For the purpose of determining who will be eligible to receive a course grade of Honors (“H”), the

final cognitive score and final OMM laboratory score will be combined in a 75%/25% ratio,

respectively.

b. Using the formula noted above, students scoring in the top 10% (and who have not taken a makeup

exam within the course or remediated the course) will receive a course grade of Honors.

50

DOCTOR PATIENT CONTINUUM(DPC) – BIOPSYCHOSOCIAL

SCIENCES I

Grading and Evaluation Policy:

The examinations and evaluations are weighed as follows:

Evaluation Criteria: Percent of Grade

Content Examination 55%

Component Examinations 25%

Facilitator Assessment 20%

Content Examination: There will a mid-term exam and an end of the term exam, each weighted equally. The

examinations will cover the learning issues submitted by the case-study groups. Questions will be based on the

common learning issues (covered by all groups) and learning issues specific to individual groups (unique issues).

Component Exams: Distribution of the component exams will be as follows:

 Exams based on Anatomy lectures and labs = 20%

 Graded assignments offered by problem set instructors, which might include quizzes, position papers,

and/or other exercises = 5%

Facilitator Assessment: Facilitators will meet individually with students twice during the term to evaluate their

performance. The first evaluation will be ‘formative’ only, i.e., to advise students of their progress and will not be

recorded for grade. The end of the term evaluation will be used to assess the student’s progress/participation in the

group and other class related activities. Students will also complete Self-Assessment Forms to supplement the

evaluation process.

The grading of this course is on a “PASS/FAIL/HONORS” basis.

1) Students will be evaluated each Term using the multiple components as described above.

2) Each year at the end of the 1st Term:

a) All students will be assigned an interim grade of I (Incomplete);

b) Each student will be informed of his/her final average, a record of which will be maintained in the office of

the DPC Academic Coordinator and the Director of the DPC program.

3) Students who earn less than a 1st-Term average of 70%, or a content exam score of <65%, will be officially

informed that their performance was deficient for the 1st Term. The student, in consultation with the Course

Coordinator, will present a plan designed to resolve the deficiency. This information will also be forwarded to

the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs for tracking purposes.

4) Students with a 1st-Term average <70%, or a content exam score of <65%, will be allowed to continue with the

class. However, in order to pass the year the student must achieve a final yearly average (1st- and 2ndterm)

of 70% or greater with a content exam average (for the two Terms) of 65% or greater.

5) All students who meet the requirements for passing the year (see 4) will then be awarded the grade of P (Pass)

or H (Honors) for each of the two Terms.

51

6) Students who fail the year (see 4) will be awarded a grade of I (Incomplete) and will be permitted (with

approval of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs) to sit for a comprehensive reassessment-examination.

The reassessment exam will be constructed by the course faculty and administered by the Course Coordinator.

The exam may include both written and oral components. Successful completion of the reassessment

examination will result in the awarding of a grade of P for the two Terms. Failure of the comprehensive

reassessment exam will result in the awarding of a grade of F (Fail) for the two terms, and a recommendation to

the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs that the student be dismissed from the College.

7) Students whose failure of the year (i.e. overall yearly average <70%) can be attributed to low facilitator

assessment scores present a special concern. The student has been determined, by his/her facilitators, to be

deficient in the skills necessary to effectively interact with patients and colleagues. This deficiency may not be

resolvable by examination. Such failures will be evaluated by the Director of the DPC program, the Associate

Dean of Academic Affairs and/or the Committee on Student Progress (CSP) to determine possible remediation

programs or to consider other options including dismissal.

52

DOCTOR PATIENT CONTINUUM(DPC) – CLINICAL SCIENCES II

Grading Policy:

1. The grading of this course is on a “PASS/FAIL/HONORS” basis. Grades will be determined by performance

in the three components of the course, OMM, Clinical Skills, and Clinical Practicum, as follows:

Evaluation Criteria: Percent of Grade

OMM 40%

Clinical Skills 40%

Clinical Practicum 20%

In both the OMM and Clinical Skills components of the course, student evaluations will encompass written

and practical examinations. In order to pass the course, both the written and practical examinations in OMM

AND Clinical Skills must be passed. Students who fail to achieve a passing score in either Clinical Skills or

OMM will be issued a grade of “I” (Incomplete). Such students will be offered the opportunity to remediate

the appropriate portion of the course. Re-evaluation will be conducted under the supervision of the DPC

faculty. Successful completion of the re-evaluation examination, both written and practical, will result in the

awarding of a grade of P (Pass). Failure of the comprehensive reassessment exam will result in the

awarding of a grade of U (Unsatisfactory) for this course.

2. Grading of the OMM component will be evaluated according to the following criteria:

Evaluation Criteria: Percent of Grade

OMM written (weighted) 50%

OMM practical (average) 50%

3. Grading of the Clinical Practicum component will be evaluated according to the following criteria:

Evaluation Criteria: Percent of Grade

Attendance and Participation 15%

Case Presentation 35%

Clinical Mentor Evaluation 50%

53

4. Grading of the Clinical Skills component will be evaluated according to the following criteria:

Evaluation Criteria: Percent of Grade

Class participation/assignments 5%

ICC participation/assignments 10%

Timed examination #1

– Practical portion 20%

– Written portion 5%

Timed examination #2

– Practical portion 20%

– Written portion 5%

Timed Comprehensive examination

– Practical portion 25%

– Written portion 10%

Pre-clinical Years: Years I and II DPC Track

54

Assessing the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) Core Competencies at

New York College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYCOM)

A. Background

In recent years, there has been a trend toward defining, teaching and assessing a number

of core competencies physicians must demonstrate. The Federation of State medical Boards

sponsored two Competency-Accountability Summits in which a “theoretical textbook” on good

medical practice was drafted to guide the development of a competency-based curriculum. The

competencies include: medical knowledge, patient care, professionalism, interpersonal

communication, practice-based learning, and system-based practice. The AOA supports the

concepts of core competency assessment and added an additional competency: osteopathic

philosophy and osteopathic clinical medicine.

Arguably it is desirable to begin the process of core competency training and assessment

during the pre-clinical year. Patient simulations, i.e. using standardized patients and robotic

simulator, allow for such training and assessment under controlled conditions. Such a pre-clinical

program provides basic clinical skills acquisition in a patient-safe environment. NYCOM has

responded to this challenge by creating a two-year “Core Clinical Competencies” seminar that

requires students to learn and practice skills through various patient simulations in the Institute

For Clinical Competence (ICC). In this seminar the ICC assesses a sub-set of the above

competencies taught in the lecture-based and discussion-based clinical education tracks.

The following is a list of the competencies assessed during the pre-clinical years at

NYCOM, and reassessed during the third year (osteopathic medicine objective structured

clinical examination) and fourth year (voluntary Clinical Skills Capstone Program). It should be

noted that there is a fair amount of skills overlap between the competencies, for example, the

issue of proper communication can be manifested in a number of competencies.

B. Core Clinical Competencies

1. Patient Care: Provide compassionate, appropriate effective treatment, health promotion

Skills:

 Data-gathering: history-taking, physical examination (assessed with clinical skills

checklists)

 Develop differential diagnosis

 Interpret lab results, studies

 Procedural skills, e.g. intubation, central line placement, suturing, catheterization

 Provide therapy

2. Interpersonal and communication skills: Effective exchange of information and collaboration

with patients, their families, and health professionals.

Skills:

 Communication with patients and their families across a spectrum of multicultural

backgrounds (assessed with the Professionalism Assessment Rating Scale)

55

 Health team communication

 Written communication (SOAP note, progress note)

3. Professionalism: Commitment to carrying out professional responsibilities and ethical

committments

Skills:

 Compassion, respect, integrity for others

 Responsiveness to patient needs

 Respect for privacy, autonomy

 Communication and collaboration with other professionals

 Demonstrating appropriate ethical consideration

 Sensitivity and responsiveness to a diverse patient population including e.g. gender,

age, religion, culture, disabilities, sexual orientation.

4. Osteopathic Philosophy and Osteopathic Clinical Medicine: Demonstrate, apply knowledge

of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT); integrate osteopathic concepts and OMT into

medical care; treating the person, and not just the symptoms

Skills:

 Utilize caring, compassionate behavior with patients

 Demonstrate the treatment of people rather than the symptoms

 Demonstrate understanding of somato-visceral relationships and the role of the

musculoskeletal disease

 Demonstrate listening skills in interaction with patients

 Assessing disease (pathology) and illness (patient’s response to disease)

 Eliciting psychosocial information

C. Assessment of Core Competencies

The ICC utilizes formative assessment to evaluate learner skills and the effectiveness of

NYCOM’s clinical training programs. Data on student performance in the ICC is tracked from

the first through the fourth year. The ICC satellite at St. Barnabas assesses students during their

clerkship years as well as interns and residents in a number of clinical services. It uses a variety

of methods to assess competencies:

1. Written evaluations

 Analytic assessment – skills checklists that document data-gathering ability

 Global-holistic rating scales to assess doctor-patient communication (Professionalism

Assessment Rating Scale) and health team communication (SimCom-T)

 SOAP note and progress note assessment

2. Debriefing / feedback – a verbal review of learner actions following a patient simulation

program provided by standardized patients and instructors as appropriate.

56

Core Clinical Competencies 590 (MS 1)

Core Clinical Competencies 690 (MS 2)

The courses provide a horizontal integration between clinical courses provided by the LDB and

DPC programs (small group discussion and demonstration) and the OMM department. It

provides practice with simulated patients (some variation in this aspect as noted below),

formative assessment, end-of-year summative assessment and remediation.

1. SP PROGRAM, METRICS AND HOURS

MS 1 Program – SP Different program, same standardized examination

LDB

 SP program: training with formative assessment (see next bullet for formative assessment

metrics)

 End of year OSCE assessing history-taking (checklists designed for each SP case), PE (see

attached physical examination criteria) and interpersonal communication (see attached

program in doctor-patient communication “Professionalism Assessment Rating Scale)

 Hours: 13.5 / year (including OSCE)

DPC

 Clinic visits to substitute for SP encounters

 End of year OSCE (same as LDB)

 Hours: Should be equivalent to the number of SP hours in the LDB program

NOTE: The purpose of the OSCE is to assess the clinical training of both the LDB and DPC

programs. It is assumed the LDB and DPC faculty will work on this OSCE together with the

OMM department.

MS 1 Program – Patient Simulation Program

LDB and DPC

 Same program in basic procedures for both LDB and DPC students as outlined in the

syllabus distributed during the curriculum committee

 Hours: 5 hours / year

57

MS 2 Program – SP

LDB and DPC – same program, different approaches, same standardized exam

 SP program: training with formative assessment (see next bullet for formative assessment

metrics)

 End of year OSCE assessing history-taking (checklists designed for each SP case), PE (see

attached physical examination criteria) and interpersonal communication (see attached

program in doctor-patient communication “Professionalism Assessment Rating Scale)

 Hours: 13.5 hours / year (including OSCE)

 NOTE: It is assumed that the LDB and DPC program schedules will vary but that the

content will be equivalent

MS 2 Program – Patient Simulation Program

LDB and DPC – same program, same standardized exam

 Students work in the same group throughout the year

End of year OSCE assessing medical team communication using the SimCom-T rating scale

(attached)

 Group grade assigned for the OSCE (reflecting the spirit of the SimCom-T rating scale)

 Hours: 11 / year (including OSCE)

2. Attendance

 All activities and exams are mandatory.

 Make ups are done at the discretion of the ICC

NOTE: Make ups will be done as close to an activity as possible because delaying them, e.g. to

the end of the year, will incur additional training expenses (e.g. re-training a SP for a case played

months earlier) for the ICC.

3. Grading and remediation

 Pass / fail

 Grading is based upon:

o Attendance

o Participation

o End-of-year OSCE (standards to be set)

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ICC Hours

MS1

Clinical Practice OSCE Total

Hours

LDB 8 SP exercises @1.5 hours each

12 hours per student

5 patient simulation program exercises @ 1 hours

each

5 hours per student

End-of-year SP OSCE

1.5 hours per student

(approximately 6.25 days)

13.5 hours

(SP)

5 hours

(Pat Sim)

Total = 18.5

DPC Clinic experience to substitute for SP exercises

 Students will receive information re:

communication and PE competencies

5 patient simulation program exercises @ 1 hours

each

5 hours per student

0 hours

(SP)

5 hours

Pat Sim

Total = 5

MS2

Clinical Practice OSCE Total

Hours

LDB

DPC

8 SP exercises @1.5 hours each

12 hours per student

6 patient simulation program exercises, plus ACLS

10 hours per student

End-of-year SP OSCE

1.5 hours per student

(approximately 6.25 days)

End-of-year Pat Sim OSCE

1 hour per student

(approximately 5 days)

13.5 hours

(SP)

11 hours

(Pat Sim)

Total = 24.5

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© 2007 NYCOM Do not reproduce or distribute without permission 9/4/07

Institute For Clinical Competence (ICC)

Professionalism Assessment Rating Scale (PARS)

Dear Students:

As part of your professional development, standardized patients (SPs) in the ICC will be

evaluating your interpersonal communication with them using the Professionalism Assessment

Rating Scale (PARS).

This scale evaluates two types of interpersonal communication, both important to quality health

care:

􀂃 Patient Relationship Quality – Rapport, empathy, confidence and body language.

􀂃 Patient Examination Quality – Questioning, listening, information exchanging and careful and

thorough physical examination.

Arguably patients (real or simulated) are in the best position to assess your interpersonal

communication with them because you are directly relating to them during an intimate, face-toface,

hands-on encounter. They are in the best position, literally, to observe your eye contact,

demeanor and body language because they are in the room with you. We would recommend you

take their feedback seriously, but perhaps “with a grain of salt.”

The term standardized patient is to some degree a misnomer – SPs can be standardized to

present the same challenge and the same medical symptoms to each student, but they cannot be

standardized to feel the same way about you and your work with them compared to other

students. This is true in life as well as clinical work – some people will like you better than others,

and patients are people! You may communicate with one patient the way you do with the next,

but receive slightly different ratings. This is to be expected. Unlike the analytic checklists we use

to document if you asked particular questions or performed certain exams correctly, there are no

dichotomous / “right or wrong” communication ratings. Patients are people who may tune into

different things during an encounter. We think this slight variation in observation is an asset that

will help you understand that patients are individuals who must be approached as individuals.

Another word about the ratings you will receive – the ratings are not absolute numbers that

constitute an unconditional assessment of your communication skills. Some days you may be

better than other days. We use the ratings numbers (1-8 holistic scale) to chart progress over

time. We do see improvements during the first two years of the typical student’s training but the

ratings are used to track your progress as much as to structure a conversation with the SP, or

faculty member, during debriefing. We would recommend you take responsibility during SP

debriefing and ask them questions about the work you just did.

The holistic 1 – 8 scale is broken down into two parts: Ratings of 1 – 4 are considered “lower

quality” communication, i.e. what might be considered acceptable at a novice or trainee level, but

less acceptable for an experienced professional. Ratings of 5 – 8 are considered “higher quality”

communication, i.e. more professional-quality communication regardless of the training or

experience level.

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© 2007 NYCOM DO NOT DISCLOSE, DISTRIBUTE OR REPRODUCE WITHOUT PERMISSION 3/18/07

Professionalism Assessment Rating Scale (PARS)

Standardized patients will rate “to what degree” you demonstrated relationship quality and

examination quality on the following nine factors:

RELATIONSHIP QUALITY

To what degree did the student …

Lower Higher

Quality Quality

1 Establish and maintain rapport 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

2 Demonstrate empathy 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

3 Instill confidence 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

4 Use appropriate body language 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

EXAMINATION QUALITY

To what degree did the student …

Lower Higher

Quality Quality

5 Elicit information clearly, effectively 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

6 Actively listen 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

7 Provide timely feedback / information / counseling 1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8

8 Perform a thorough, careful physical exam or

treatment

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

8

Less experienced, More

or unprofessional professional

The following pages are a guide to the PARS, giving examples of “lower quality” and

“higher quality” communication.

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© 2007 NYCOM DO NOT DISCLOSE, DISTRIBUTE OR REPRODUCE WITHOUT PERMISSION 3/18/07

1 Establish and maintain rapport

Establish and maintain a positive, respectful collaborative working relationship with the patient.

Lower Quality

1 2 3 4

Higher Quality

5 6 7 8

Overly familiar.

􀂃 “Hi Bill, I’m John. How are you doing

today.”

Appropriate address, e.g.

􀂃 “Hi Mr. Jones, I’m Student-doctor Smith. Is it

OK if I call you Bill?”

No agenda set. Set agenda, e.g.

No collaboration with the patient, i.e. carries

out the exam without patient consent or

agreement.

􀂃 “We have ___ minutes for this exam. I’ll take a

history, examine you…..etc.”

Collaborative mindset

􀂃 “Let’s figure out what’s going on.”

􀂃 “We’re going to work out this problem together.”

Took notes excessively, i.e. spent more time

taking notes than interacting.

Spent more time interacting with the patient than

taking notes.

Began physically examining patient without

“warming” patient up, asking consent, etc.

Asked consent for obtaining a physical

examination, e.g.

􀂃 “Is it OK for me to do a physical exam?”

Did not protect patient’s modesty, e.g.

􀂃 Did not use a drape sheet

Respected patient’s modesty at all times e.g.

􀂃 Used a drape sheet when appropriate

􀂃 Did not direct patient to get dressed after

exam

􀂃 Letting patient cover up follow an examination.

􀂃 Left door open when examining patient.

Talked “down” to patient, did not seem to

respect patient’s intelligence.

Seemed to assume patient is intelligent.

Rude, crabby or overtly disrespectful. Never rude, crabby; always respectful.

Dress, hygiene problems:

􀂃 Wore distracting perfume/cologne.

Dressed professionally, i.e. in a clean white coat,

clean clothes, etc.

􀂃 Poor hygiene, e.g. uncleanly, dirty nails,

body odor, did not wash hands, etc.

􀂃 Touched hair continually

􀂃 Unprofessional dress, e.g. wore jeans,

facial jewelry (e.g. tongue or nose studs),

overly suggestive or revealing garments

Seemed angry with the patient.

Seemed to like the patient.

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© 2007 NYCOM DO NOT DISCLOSE, DISTRIBUTE OR REPRODUCE WITHOUT PERMISSION 3/18/07

2 Demonstrate empathy

Demonstrate both empathy (compassion, understanding, concern, support) and inquisitiveness

(curiosity, interest) in the patient’s medical problem and life situation.

Lower Quality Higher Quality

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

EMPATHY

No expressions of concern about patient’s

condition or situation.

Expressed concern about patient’s condition or

situation, e.g.

􀂃 “That must be painful.”

􀂃 “I’m here to try to help you.”

Failed to acknowledge positive behavior /

lifestyle changes the patient has made.

Reinforced behavior/lifestyle changes the patient

has made, e.g. “That’s great you quit smoking.”

Failed to acknowledge suggested behavior /

lifestyle changes might be difficult.

Acknowledged that suggested behavior/lifestyle

changes might be difficult.

Empathic expression seemed insincere,

superficial.

Empathic expressions seemed genuine.

Detached, aloof, overly “business-like,” robotic in

demeanor.

Compassionate and caring, “warm.”

Seeming lack of compassion, caring.

Accused patient of being a non-compliant, e.g.

􀂃 “Why don’t you take better care of yourself?”

􀂃 “You should have come in sooner.”

Positive reinforcement of things patient is doing

well, e.g.

􀂃 “That’s great that you stopped smoking.”

􀂃 “I’m glad you are taking your medication on a

regular basis.

INQUISITIVENESS – An aspect of empathy is inquisitiveness, the ability to attempt to

understand the patient, both medically and personally.

Focused on symptoms, but not the patient, i.e.

did not explore how the medical problem /

symptoms affect the patient’s life.

Tried to understand how the medical problem /

symptoms affect the patient’s life, or vice versa.

􀂃 “How is this affecting your life?”

􀂃 “Tell me about yourself.”

Failed to explore activities of daily living. 􀂃 “Describe a typical day in your life.”

􀂃 “Tell me about your stress.”

Failed to explore patient’s response to diagnosis

and / or treatment.

Inquires as to patient’s response to diagnosis and

/ or treatment

Failed to explore barriers to behavior / lifestyle

change.

Explored barriers to behavior / lifestyle change.

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3 Instill confidence

Instilling confidence that the medical student or doctor is able to help and treat the patient.

Lower Quality

1 2 3 4

Higher Quality

5 6 7 8

Conveyed his / her anxiety, e.g. Conveyed an appropriately confident demeanor,

e.g.

􀂃 Made eye contact

􀂃 By avoiding eye contact

􀂃 Laughing or smiling nervously

􀂃 Sweaty hand shake

Made statement such as:

􀂃 “This is making me nervous.”

􀂃 “This is the first time I’ve ever done this.”

􀂃 “I don’t know what I’m doing.”

Apologized inappropriately to the patient. E.g.

􀂃 “I’m sorry, but I have to examine you.”

􀂃 Shook hands firmly, etc.

Overly confident, cocky.

Never cocky, appropriately humble without

undermining the patient’s confidence.

When making suggestions, used tentative

language, e.g.

􀂃 “Maybe you should try…”

􀂃 “I’m not sure but …”

When making suggestions, used authoritative

language, e.g.

􀂃 “What I suggest you do is…”

Made excuses for his/her lack of skill or

preparation by making statements such as:

Offered to help the patient or get information if he

/ she could not provide it by saying, e.g.

􀂃 “I’m just a medical student.”

􀂃 “Let me ask the attending physician”

􀂃 “They didn’t explain this to me.”

􀂃 “Do you know what I’m supposed to do next?”

􀂃 “I don’t know but let me find out for you.”

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4 Use appropriate body language

The ability to use appropriate gestures, signs and body cues.

Lower Quality Higher Quality

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Overly casual posture, e.g. leaning against

the wall or putting feet up on a stool when

interviewing the patient.

Professional posture, i.e. carried himself / herself

like an experienced, competent physician.

Awkward posture, e.g.

• Stood stiffly when taking a history

• Stood as if he / she was unsure what to do

with his / her body.

Natural, poised posture.

Uncomfortable or inappropriate eye contact

e.g. stared at the patient too long and / or

never looked at the patient.

Used appropriate eye contact.

Avoided eye contact when listening.

Made eye contact when listening, whether eye

level of not.

Stood or sat too close or too distant from the

patient.

Maintained an appropriate “personal closeness”

and “personal distance.”

Turned away from the patient when listening.

Maintained appropriate body language when

listening to the patient.

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5 Elicit information clearly, effectively

Effectively ask questions in an articulate, understandable, straightforward manner.

Lower Quality Higher Quality

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Used closed-ended, yes / no questions

exclusively, e.g.

Used open-ended questions to begin an inquiry,

and closed-ended questions to clarify, e.g.

􀂃 “How many days have you 􀂃 “Tell me about the problem.”

been sick?” 􀂃 “What do you do in a typical day?”

􀂃 “Ever had surgery?” 􀂃 “How is your health in general?”

􀂃 “Any cancer in your family?”

Used open-ended questions / non-clarifying

questions exclusively.

Used open-ended questions to begin an inquiry,

and closed-ended questions to clarify.

Student’s questions were inarticulate, e.g.

mumbled, spoke too fast, foreign accent

problems, stuttered*, etc.

* NOTE: Consider stuttering a form of inarticulation for

rating purposes, i.e. do not make allowances for

stuttering

Student was articulate, asked questions in an

intelligible manner.

Asked confusing, multi-part or overly complex

questions, e.g.

􀂃 “Tell me about your past medical

conditions, surgeries and allergies.”

Asked one question at a time, in a straight-forward

manner.

􀂃 “Tell me about your allergies.”

Asked direct questions, e.g.

Asked leading questions, e.g.

􀂃 “No cancer in your family, right?”

􀂃 “No surgeries?” 􀂃 “Do you have any cancer in your family?

􀂃 “You only have sex with your wife, right?” 􀂃 “Any surgeries?”

􀂃 “Are you monogamous?”

Jumped from topic to topic Organized interview.

in a “manic,” disjointed or

disorganized way.

Stayed focused, asked follow up questions before

moving to another topic.

Asked questions in a robotic way, Asked questions in a conversational way, i.e.

listened to the response, and then asked another

question.

i.e. as if reading from a prepared

checklist.

Constantly cut off patient, i.e. did

not let patient finish sentences.

Allowed patient to finish sentences and thoughts

before asking the next question.

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6 Actively listen

Both listen and respond appropriately to the patients’ statements and questions.

Lower Quality Higher Quality

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Asked questions without listening to the

patient’s response.

Asked questions and listened to patient’s

response.

No overt statements made indicating he / she

was listening.

Said, e.g. “I’m listening.”

Turned away from the patient when listening.

Maintained appropriate body language when

listening to the patient.

Kept asking the same question(s) because

the physician didn’t seem to remember what

he / she asks.

If necessary, asked the same questions to obtain

clarification, e.g.

􀂃 “Can you tell me again how much you smoke?”

􀂃 “I know you told me this, but when was the last

time you saw your doctor?”

Wrote notes without indicating he / she was

listening.

When writing indicated he / she is listening, e.g.

􀂃 “I have to write down a few things down when

we talk, OK?”

Did not seem to be listening, seemed

distracted.

Attentive to the patient.

Kept talking, asking questions, etc. if the

patient was discussing a personal issue, a

health concern, fear, etc.

Was silent when necessary, e.g. if the patient was

discussing a personal issue, a health concern,

fear, etc.

67

7 Provide timely feedback / information / counseling

Explain, summarize information (e.g. results of physical exams, provides patient education

activities, etc.), or provide counseling in a clear and timely manner.

Lower Quality Higher Quality

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Did not explain examination procedures, e.g.

just started examining the patient without

explaining what he / she was doing.

Explained procedures, e.g.

􀂃 “I’m going to check your legs for edema.”

􀂃 “I’m going to listen to your heart.”

Did not provide feedback at all, or provided

minimal feedback

Periodically provided feedback regarding what he /

she heard the patient saying.

􀂃 “It sounds like your work schedule makes it

difficult for you to exercise.”

􀂃 “I hear in your voice that your family situation is

causing you a lot of stress.”

Did not summarize information at all. Periodically summarized information.

􀂃 “You had this cough for 3 weeks, it’s getting

worse and now you’ve got a fever. No one is

sick at home and you haven’t been around

anyone who is sick.”

Provided empty feedback or unprofessional

feedback, e.g.

Feedback was meaningful, useful and timely.

􀂃 “OK…..OK…..OK…..OK…”

􀂃 “Gotcha..gotcha…gotcha,..”

􀂃 “Great ” “Awesome” “Cool”

Examined the patient without providing

feedback about the results of the exam.

Provided feedback about results of the physical

exam.

􀂃 “Your blood pressure seems fine.”

Refused to give the patient information he /

she requested, e.g.

“You don’t need to know that.”

“That’s not important.”

Give information to the patient when requested, or

offered to get it if he / she couldn’t answer the

patient’s questions.

Used medical jargon without explanation, e.g. Explained medical terms.

􀂃 “What you experienced was a myocardial

infarction.”

􀂃 “What you experienced is a myocardial

infarction, meaning a heart attack.”

Ended the exam abruptly.

Let the patient know what the next step was,

provided closure.

No closure, no information about the next

steps

􀂃 “Let’s review the exam and your health…”

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8 Conduct a thorough, careful physical exam or treatment

Conduct physical exams and / or treatment in a thorough, careful manner vs. a tentative or

superficial manner.

Lower Quality Higher Quality

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Conducted a superficial examination, e.g. Conducted a careful examination, e.g.

􀂃 Avoided touching the patient 􀂃 Examined on skin when appropriate

􀂃 Touched patient with great tentativeness

Hurried through the exam. Used the full amount of time allotted to examine

the patient.

Avoided inspecting (looking at) the patient’s

body / affected area.

Thoroughly inspected (looked at) the affected

area e.g. with gown open.

Consistently palpated, auscultated and / or

percussed over the exam gown.

Consistently palpated, auscultated and / or

percussed on skin.

Exam not bi-lateral (when appropriate). Bi-lateral exam (when appropriate).

Rough exam, e.g. Conducted a smooth exam from beginning to

􀂃 Started, stopped, re-started the exam. end.

􀂃 Fumbled with instruments

Did not look to see what patient’s expressions

were during an examination in order to assess

pain.

Looked for facial expressions to assess pain.

Did not thoroughly examine the site of the

chief complaint, e.g.

Thoroughly examined the site of the chief

complaint.

􀂃 Did not examine heart and / or lungs if

chief complaint was a breathing problem

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9 Conduct the examination in an organized manner

Overall conduct the exam in an organized, systematic way vs. a disorganized or unsystematic

way.

Lower Quality Higher Quality

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

No clear opening, e.g. Clear opening, e.g.

􀂃 Did not set an agenda 􀂃 Set an agenda and followed it

􀂃 Abruptly began the exam 􀂃 Began the exam after a proper introduction

Medical interview not organized – history

jumped from topic to topic

Organize the medical interview vs. jumping from

topic to topic

No clear closure, e.g. Clear closure, e.g.

􀂃 Did not summarize information gathered

during the history and physical

examination

􀂃 Summarized information gathered during the

history and physical examination

􀂃 Did not ask patient “Any more questions?” 􀂃 Asked patient “Any more questions?”

􀂃 Did not clarify next steps 􀂃 Clarified next steps

70

SimCom-T(eam) Holistic Scoring Guide

The SimCom-T is a holistic health care team communication training program and rating scale. The nine-factor scale of SimCom-T

rates team members’ performance as a unit, i.e. individual team member performance should be considered a reflection upon the

entire team.

Rate each factor individually.

Ratings should be global, i.e. reflect the most characteristic performance of the team vs. individual incidents.

The following pages are a guide to SimCom-T, providing behavioral examples representative of each score for the SimCom-T

competencies.

Score Performance Level Description – The team…

1 Limited ….consistently demonstrates novice and / or dysfunctional team attributes

2 Basic ….inconsistently operates at a functional level

3 Progressing ….demonstrates basic and average attributes

4 Proficient ….proficient and consistent in performance

5 Advanced ….experienced and performing at a significant expert level

CNE Not applicable ….A factor could not be evaluated for some reason

Competency Lower

Quality

Higher

Quality

1 Leadership establishment and maintenance 1 2 3 4 5 CNE

2 Global awareness 1 2 3 4 5 CNE

3 Recognition of critical events 1 2 3 4 5 CNE

4 Information exchange 1 2 3 4 5 CNE

5 Team support 1 2 3 4 5 CNE

6 External team support 1 2 3 4 5 CNE

7 Patient support 1 2 3 4 5 CNE

8 Mutual trust and respect 1 2 3 4 5 CNE

9 Flexibility 1 2 3 4 5 CNE

10 Overall Team Performance 1 2 3 4 5 CNE

71

1. Leadership Establishment and Maintenance

Team members both establish leadership and maintain leadership throughout.

Lower Quality Higher Quality

Score 1 2 3 4 5 CNE

Level Limited Basic Progressing Proficient Advanced

Description ▪ Leader not

established

▪ Roles not assigned

▪ No discussion

regarding role

assignment

▪ Unable to identify

leader

▪ Many leaders

▪ No clear role

definition

▪ Leadership not

explicit throughout

event

▪ Leadership not

maintained

throughout the event

▪ Role switching

without leader

involvement

▪ Leader explicitly

identified

▪ Roles defined

▪ Leadership explicitly

identified and

maintained

▪ Roles defined and

maintained

▪ Leader delegates

responsibility

Examples ▪ Team operating

dysfunctionally

without a leader

▪ Team members

taking on similar roles

and role switching

consistently

▪ Team members

unsure of who is

responsible for

different tasks

▪ Leader timid and

does not take charge

▪ Team member roles

unclear and/or

inconsistent

▪ A team member asks,

“Who is running the

code?” and another

says, “I am,” but does

not take communicate

leadership

responsibilities.

▪ Team members are

assigned roles but do

not take on the

assignment

▪ Team members

select a leader

▪ A team member

volunteers to handle

the situation

▪ Roles clearly defined

by team members

and/or leader

▪ Leadership and roles

are established very

early in the event and

is maintained

throughout the event

▪ Clarity of leadership

and roles is evident

throughout the event

and with the team

members

72

2. Global Awareness

Team members monitor and appropriately respond to the total situation, i.e. the work environmental and the patient’s condition.

Lower Quality Higher Quality

Score 1 2 3 4 5 CNE

Level Limited Basic Progressing Proficient Advanced

Description ▪ Does not monitor the

environment and

patient

▪ Does not respond to

changes in the

environment and

patient

▪ Monitoring and

response to changes

in the environment

and patient rarely

occur

▪ Fixation errors

▪ Monitoring and

response to the

environment and

patient are not evident

throughout the event

▪ Monitors the

environment and

patient

▪ Respond to changes

in the environment

and patient

▪ Consistently monitors

the environment and

patient

▪ Consistently respond

to changes in the

environment and

patient

Examples ▪ There is no summary

of procedures, labs

ordered, or results of

labs

▪ Team is task oriented

and does not

communicate about

the event

▪ Event manager loses

focus and becomes

task oriented

▪ There is no clear

review of the lab

results and/or

summary of

procedures.

▪ Leader says, “Team,

lets review our

differential diagnosis

and labs,” and team

does not respond to

the leader.

▪ Some of the team

members discuss

among themselves

results and possible

problems.

▪ Leader says, “Team,

lets review our

differential diagnosis

and labs,” and team

reviews the situation.

▪ Event manager

remains at the foot of

the bed keeping a

global assessment of

the situation

▪ Leader announces

plan of action for the

event.

73

3. Recognition of Critical Events

Team promptly notes and responds to critical changes in the patient’s status and / or environment.

Lower Quality Higher Quality

Score 1 2 3 4 5 CNE

Level Limited Basic Progressing Proficient Advanced

Description ▪ Does not monitor or

respond to critical

deviations from steady

state

▪ Fails to recognize or

acknowledge crisis

▪ “Tunnel Vision”

▪ Fixation errors are

consistently apparent

▪ Team reactive rather

than proactive

▪ Critical deviations

from steady state are

not announced for

other members

▪ Monitors and

responds to critical

deviations from steady

state

▪ Recognizes need for

action

▪ All team members

consistently monitors

and responds to

critical deviations from

steady state

▪ Anticipates potential

problems

▪ Practices a proactive

approach and attitude

▪ Recognizes need for

action

▪ “Big Picture”

Examples ▪ Patient stops

breathing, and team

does not recognize

the situation

throughout the event

▪ Patient is pulseless,

and no CPR is started

throughout the event

▪ Patient stops

breathing, and team

does not recognize

this situation for a

critical time period

▪ Patient is pulseless,

and no CPR is started

for a critical time

period

▪ ▪ Leader says, “Team,

lets review our

differential diagnosis,

are there any

additional tests that

we should request?”

▪ “John, the sats are

dropping, please be

ready, we might have

to intubate.”

▪ “Melissa, the blood

pressure is dropping.

Get ready to start the

2nd IV and order a

type and cross.”

74

4. Information Exchange

Patient and procedural information is exchanged clearly.

Lower Quality Higher Quality

Score 1 2 3 4 5 CNE

Level Limited Basic Progressing Proficient Advanced

Description ▪ Communication

between team

members is not

noticeable

▪ Requests by others

are not acknowledged

▪ No feedback loop

▪ No orders given

▪ Vague

communication

between team

members

▪ Not acknowledging

requests by others

▪ Feedback loop left

opened

▪ Orders not clearly

given

▪ Communication

between team and

response to requests

by others inconsistent

▪ Feedback loops open

and closed

▪ Orders not directed to

a specific team

member

▪ Team communicates

and acknowledges

requests throughout

the event

▪ Feedback loops

closed

▪ Explicit

communication

consistently

throughout the event

▪ Team acknowledges

communication

▪ Closed loop

communication

throughout event

Examples ▪ No summary of

events.

▪ No additional

information sought

from the team

members.

▪ Event manager says,

“I need a defibrillator,

we might have to

shock this patient,”

and no team member

acknowledges the

order. The request

was not given

explicitly to a team

member.

▪ One team member

says to another in a

low voice, “We need

to place a chest tube,”

but the event

manager does not

hear the

communication.

▪ Event manager

requests a

defibrillator, but not

explicitly to a

particular team

member; several

team members

attempt to get the

defibrillator

▪ Jonathan says to

event manager, “We

need to place a chest

tube.” Event manager

responds, “OK, get

ready for it.”

▪ Leader says, “Team,

lets summarizes what

has been done so

far.”

▪ Leader says, “Mary

please start an IV.”

Mary responds,

“Sorry, I do not know

how, please ask

someone else to do

it.”

▪ Event manager

summarizes events.

▪ Event manager seeks

additional information

from all team

members

▪ Event manager says,

“Peter, I want you to

get the defibrillator,

we might have to

shock this patient.”

Peter responds, “Yes,

I know where it is and

I’ll get it.”

75

5. Team Support

The team works as a unit, asking for or offering assistance when needed vs. team members “going it alone.”

Lower Quality Higher Quality

Score 1 2 3 4 5 CNE

Level Limited Basic Progressing Proficient Advanced

Description ▪ No assistance or help

asked for or offered

▪ Team members act

unilaterally

▪ No recognition of

mistakes

▪ Team members

watching and not

participating

▪ Team members take

over when not

needed

▪ Mistakes not

addressed to the

team

▪ Negative feedback

▪ Assistance is offered

when needed only

after multiple requests

▪ Team recognizes

mistakes and

constructively

addresses them

▪ Team member(s)

ask(s) for help when

needed

▪ Assistance provided

to team member(s)

who need(s) it

Examples ▪ During a shoulder

dystocia event, the

critical situation is

recognized, but no

help is requested or

attempts to resolve

situation on their own

▪ Wrong blood type

delivered and

administered, an no

backup behaviors to

correct the mistake

▪ Team member

administers

medication without

consulting the event

manager

▪ Charles knows that

the patient is a

Jehovah Witness and

does not let the team

know when a T&C is

ordered.

▪ Team does not

communicate that

he/she doesn’t know

how to use a

defibrillator and

attempts to do it

anyways and fails.

▪ ▪ ▪ During a shoulder

dystocia event, the

critical situation is

recognized, and event

manager calls for help

▪ Wrong blood type

delivered, attempt

made by team

member to administer

the blood but another

team member

recognizes the

mistake and stops the

transfusion before it

starts

▪ Team member

consults with the

event manager before

administering

medication

76

6. External Team Support

Work team provides “external team” (family members and / or other health care professionals) with information and support as

needed

Lower Quality Higher Quality

Score 1 2 3 4 5 CNE

Level Limited Basic Progressing Proficient Advanced

Description ▪ Team fails to

recognize or interact

with other significant

people who are

present during the

encounter

▪ Team recognizes

other significant

people who are

present during the

encounter but

ignores to interact

with them

▪ Team inconsistently

interacts with other

significant people who

are present during the

encounter

▪ Team interacts with

other significant

people who are

present during the

encounter

▪ Team effectively

interacts with other

significant people who

are present during the

encounter

Examples ▪ Team fails to interact

with a distraught

family member and/or

para-professional

▪ Team fails to interact

appropriately with a

distraught family

member

▪ Team does not

cooperate with a

para-professional

▪ ▪ ▪

77

7. Patient Support

Work team provides the patient and significant others with information and emotional support as needed.

Lower Quality Higher Quality

Score 1 2 3 4 5 CNE

Level Limited Basic Progressing Proficient Advanced

Description ▪ Team fails to interact

with patient if

conscious

▪ Team fails to show

empathy or respect

for a patient

(conscious or

unconscious)

▪ Team fails to provide

appropriate

information when

requested to do so

▪ Teams interaction

with patient is

minimal and when

done so is lacking in

respect or empathy

▪ Team inconsistently

shows empathy or

respect for a patient

(conscious or

unconscious)

▪ Team inconsistently

provides information

when requested to do

so

▪ Team shows empathy

toward patient

▪ Team provides

appropriate

information when

requested to do so

▪ Team demonstrates

consistent and

significant respect

and empathy for

patient

▪ Appropriate

information is

provided consistently

Examples ▪ Team deals with an

unconscious patient

with a lack of respect,

e.g. by joking about

his / her condition

▪ Charles knows that

the patient is a

Jehovah Witness and

does not let the team

know when a T&C is

ordered.

▪ ▪ ▪ Charles lets the

leader know that the

patient is a Jehovah

Witness and that she

refused blood

products.

78

8. Mutual Trust and Respect

The team demonstrates civility, courtesy and trust in collective judgment.

Lower Quality Higher Quality

Score 1 2 3 4 5 CNE

Level Limited Basic Progressing Proficient Advanced

Description ▪ Team exhibits e.g.

rudeness, overt

distrust/mistrust,

anger or overt doubt

or suspicion toward

each other

▪ Few team members

exhibit rudeness,

overt distrust, anger

or suspicion toward

each other

▪ Team inconsistently

demonstrates respect,

rudeness, distrust or

anger toward each

other

▪ Team exhibits e.g.

civility, courtesy, and

trust in collective

judgment

▪ Team is significantly

respectful of each

other

▪ Praise when

appropriate

Examples ▪ Angry, stressed event

manager says to team

member, “I can’t

believe you can’t

intubate the patient.

What’s the matter with

you?”

▪ Team member says

to another, “You don’t

know what you’re

doing-let me do it for

you.”

▪ Event manager

recognizes a chest

tube is needed, and

barks, “Michelle, I

want you to put in a

chest tube, I want you

to do it now, and I

want you to do it right

on your first attempt.”

▪ Leader overbearing

and intimidating

▪ ▪ Stressed but

composed leader

recognizes a team

member cannot

intubate the patient

and offers assistance

▪ Team member says

to another, “Are you

OK? Let me know if I

can help you.”

▪ Event manager

recognizes a chest

tube is needed and

says, “Michelle, this

patient needs a chest

tube-can you put it in

now?”

▪ Leader is clear, direct,

and calm.

▪ Team members will

thank each other

when appropriate.

79

9. Flexibility

The team adapts to challenges, multitasks effectively, reallocates functions, and uses resources effectively; team self correction.

Lower Quality Higher Quality

Score 1 2 3 4 5 CNE

Level Limited Basic Progressing Proficient Advanced

Description ▪ Team rigidly adheres

to individual team

roles

▪ Inefficient resource

allocation / use

▪ Minimal adaptability

and/or hesitation to

changing situations

▪ Team can adapt to

certain situations, but

not all

▪ Generally very flexible

▪ Multi-tasks effectively

▪ Reallocates functions

▪ Uses resources

effectively

▪ Team adapts to

challenges

consistently

▪ Engages selfcorrection

Examples ▪ Ambu-bag not

working, and no

reallocation of

resources established

▪ Team members stay

in individual roles,

failing to support each

other e.g. by failing to

recognize fatigue of

those giving CPR

▪ Patient’s hysterical

family member

disrupts the team and

team continues

providing care,

ignoring disruptive

relative

▪ ▪ ▪ Ambu-bag not

working, and an

airway team member

gives mouth-to-mouth

with a mask and

event manager asks

another team member

to retrieve a working

ambu-bag

▪ Team members

alternate giving CPR,

recognizing fatigue of

those giving CPR

▪ Patient’s hysterical

family member

disrupts the team and

a team manages the

situation, e.g.

removes, counsels, or

reassures the family

member

80

10. Overall Team Performance

Lower Quality Higher Quality

Score 1 2 3 4 5 CNE

Level Limited Basic Progressing Proficient Advanced

Description ▪ Consistently

operating at a novice

training level

▪ Demonstrates

inconsistent efforts to

operate at a

functional level

▪ Inconsistently

demonstrates below

and average

attributes

▪ Demonstrates

significant

cohesiveness as a

team unit;

▪ Performs proficiently

▪ Consistently operates

at an experienced

and professional

level; performs as

experts

Training

Level

▪ Team requires

training at all levels;

unable to function

independently

▪ Team needs training

at multiple levels to

function

independently

▪ Team needs focused

training to function

independently

▪ Team can function

independently with

supervision

▪ Team functions

independently

81

Case A – Dizziness, Acute

Student ___________________________ Student ID _________ SP ID _________

History Scoring: Give students credit (Yes) if they ask any of the following questions and / or SPs

give the following responses. If question(s) not asked or response(s) not give, give no credit (No).

HISTORY CHECKLIST Yes No

1 ONSET, e.g. “When did dizziness start?”

• “The dizziness started last night when I was cleaning up after dinner.”

2 PAST MEDICAL HISTORY OF PROBLEM, e.g. “Ever had this problem

before?”

􀂃 “I almost passed out once in restaurant a few months ago. The EMT

truck came and checked me out and they thought I was dehydrated

from exercising. I had just come from the gym.”

3 QUALITY, e.g. “Describe the dizziness.”

• “Every few minutes or so I get the feeling the room is spinning and I

feel a little nauseous, then it goes away and I feel OK. Then it starts all

over again.”

4 AGGRAVATING, e.g. “What makes the dizziness worse?”

􀂃 “Standing up with my eyes open makes me feel dizzy.”

5 PALLIATIVE, e.g. “What makes the dizziness better?”

􀂃 “Closing my eyes and laying down makes the dizziness better.”

6 HEAD INJURIES, e.g. “Have you bumped or injured your head?”

• “No head injuries.”

7 PAST MEDICAL HISTORY, e.g. “How is your health in general?”

􀂃 “In general I’ve been very healthy.”

8 MEDICATIONS, e.g. “Are you taking any medications for this problem or

anything else?”

􀂃 “I’m not taking anything. I thought of taking Dramamine but I wasn’t

sure it would help.”

9 DIET, e.g. “What do you eat in a typical day?”

􀂃 “A regular diet, toast and coffee in the morning, usually take out for

lunch, Chinese, a pizza or sub, something like that, and a regular meal

at night.”

10 TOBACCO USE, e.g. “Do you smoke?”

• “I used to smoke ó a pack a day, but now I’m down to 4 or 5,

sometimes a couple more if I’m stressed.”

11 ADLs, e.g. “How is this affecting your life?”

􀂃 “I couldn’t go to work today.”

82

Case A – Dizziness, Acute

PE SCORING:

􀂃 COLUMN 1: NO CREDIT: If any box is checked, exam was done “incorrectly” or

“incompletely.” Checked “Incorrect Details” box records reason(s) why.

􀂃 COLUMN 2: FULL CREDIT: If “Correct” box is checked, exam was done “Correctly /

Completely.”

􀂃 COLUMN 3: NO CREDIT: If “Not Done” box is checked, exam was not attempted at all.

Physical Examination Checklist 1

Incorrect

Details

2

Correct

3

Not

Done

12 Perform fundoscopic examination

􀂃 Did not ask the patient to fix their gaze at point in

front of them.

􀂃 Exam room not darkened.

􀂃 Otoscope used instead of ophthalmoscope

􀂃 “Left eye-left hand-left eye” or “right eye-right

hand -right eye rule” not followed.

􀂃 Exam not bilateral.

13 Assess Cranial Nerve II – Optic – Assess Visual

Fields by Confrontation

􀂃 Examiner not at approximate eye-level with

patient, and / or no eye contact.

􀂃 Examiner’s hands not placed outside of patient’s

field of vision.

􀂃 Did not ask “Tell me when you see my fingers.”

􀂃 Did not test both upper and lower fields, and / or

bilaterally.

14 Assess Cranial Nerves II and III – Optic and

Oculomotor: Assess direct and consensual

reactions

􀂃 Did not shine a light obliquely into each pupil

twice to check both the direct reaction and

consensual reaction.

􀂃 Did not assess bilaterally.

15 Assess Cranial Nerves II and III – Optic and

Oculomotor: Assess near reaction and near

response

􀂃 Did not test in normal room light.

􀂃 Finger, pencil, etc. placed too close or too far

from the patient’s eye.

􀂃 Did not ask the patient to look alternately at the

finger or pencil and into the distance.

83

Case A – Dizziness, Acute

PE SCORING:

􀂃 COLUMN 1: NO CREDIT: If any box is checked, exam was done “incorrectly” or

“incompletely.” Checked “Incorrect Details” box records reason(s) why.

􀂃 COLUMN 2: FULL CREDIT: If “Correct” box is checked, exam was done “Correctly /

Completely.”

􀂃 COLUMN 3: NO CREDIT: If “Not Done” box is checked, exam was not attempted at all.

1

Incorrect

Details

2

Correct

3

Not

Done

16 Assess Cranial Nerve III – Oculomotor: Assess

convergence

􀂃 Did not ask the patient to follow his / her finger or

pencil as he / she moves it in toward the bridge of

the nose.

17 Assess Cranial Nerve III, IV and VI – Oculomotor,

trochlear and abducens: Assessing extraocular

muscle movement

􀂃 Examiner did not assess extra-ocular muscle

movements in at least 6 positions of gaze using,

for example, the “H” pattern.

􀂃 Did not instruct patient to not move the head

during the exam.

18 Assess Cranial Nerve VIII – Acoustic / Weber test

􀂃 Did not produce a sound from tuning fork, e.g. by

not holding the fork at the base

􀂃 Did not place the base of the tuning fork firmly on

top middle of the patient’s head.

􀂃 Did not ask the patient where the sound appears

to be coming from.

19 Assess Cranial Nerve VIII – Acoustic / Rinne test

􀂃 Did not produce a sound from tuning fork, e.g. by

not holding the fork at the base

􀂃 Did not place the base of the tuning fork against

the mastoid bone behind the ear.

􀂃 Did not ask patient to say when he / she no longer

hears the sound, hold the end of the fork near the

patient’s ear and ask if he / she can hear the

vibration.

􀂃 Did not tap again for the second ear.

􀂃 Did not assess bilaterally.

20 Assess Gait

􀂃 Did not ask patient to walk, turn and come back to

look for imbalance, postural, asymmetry and type

of gait (e.g. shuffling, walking on toes, etc.)

21 Perform Romberg Test

􀂃 Did not direct patient to stand with feet together,

eyes closed, for at least 20 seconds without

support.

􀂃 Did not stand in a supportive position, e.g. behind

patient or with hand behind patient.

84

Case A – Dizziness, Acute

RELATIONSHIP QUALITY

To what degree did the student …

Lower Higher

Quality Quality

1 Establish and maintain rapport 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

2 Demonstrate empathy 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

3 Instill confidence 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

4 Use appropriate body language 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

EXAMINATION QUALITY

To what degree did the student …

Lower Higher

Quality Quality

5 Elicit information clearly, effectively 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

6 Actively listen 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

7 Provide timely feedback / information / counseling 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

8 Perform a thorough, careful physical exam or

treatment

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

85

3. Clinical Clerkship Evaluations / NBOME Subject Exams

Data compiled from 3rd/4th year clerkships includes:

 Student Performance Evaluations from specific hospitals (attending/supervising

physicians, and/or residents) based upon the 7 core Osteopathic Competencies.

Data is broken down further by student cohort: traditional, BS/DO, and Émigré

and is quantified according to curricular track (Lecture Discussion-Based and

Doctor Patient Continuum);

 NBOME Subject Exam scores for each of the (6) core clerkships and OMM.

Core clerkships include:

a) Family Medicine

b) Medicine

c) OB-GYN

d) Pediatrics

e) Psychiatry

f) Surgery

NBOME Subject Exam statistics are shared with 3rd year students as a frame of

reference to determine their performance relative to their NYCOM peers. These

data also serve as a general guide for COMLEX II CE preparation and

performance;

 Students provide feedback on their clinical experiences during their clerkships,

via the “PDA project”:

a) The PDA is a tool utilized for monitoring clerkship activities. The

DEALS (Daily Educational Activities Logs Submission) focuses on

educational activities, while the LOG portion focuses on all major

student-patient encounters. A rich data set is available for comparing

patient encounters and educational activities across all sites for all

clerkships.

86

b) PDA data is used as a multimodal quality assessment tool for curricular

exposure as well as OMM integration across all hospitals (including

“outside” clerkships) for Patient Encounters and Educational Activities.

 Reports from student focus groups—these reports are based upon in-person group

interviews by a full-time NYCOM Medical Educator and feedback is analyzed in

order to ensure consistency in clerkship education and experiences, as well as for

program improvement indicators.

87

Specific forms/questionnaires utilized to capture the above-detailed information include the

following:

 Clinical Clerkship Student Performance Evaluation

Samples of the forms/questionnaires follow

88

NEW YORK COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE

OFFICE OF CLINICAL EDUCATION

Northern Boulevard -– Old Westbury, NY 11568-8000

Tel.: 516-686-3718 – Fax: 516-686-3833

(*) Only ONE form, with COMPOSITE GRADE & COMMENTS should be sent to the Hospital’s Office of

Medical Education

for the DME SIGNATURE .

COURSE # _______________________________(For NYCOM Purpose

ONLY)

STUDENT: _____________________,_______________Class Year:

______HOSPITAL:_______________________

Last First

ROTATION(Specialty)_____________________________ROTATION DATES:

____/____/____ ____/____/____

From

To

EVALUATOR: _________________________________________ TITLE:

_______________________________________

(Attending Physician / Faculty Preceptor)

A. Student logs by PDA  REVIEWED (at least 10 patients)  NOT REVIEWED

B. Student’s unique “STRENGTHS” (Very Important –To be incorporated into the

College’s Dean’s Letter)

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

____________

C. Student’s LIMITATIONS (areas requiring special attention for future professional growth)

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________

89

D. For items below CIRCLE the most appropriate number corresponding to the

following rating scale:

Exceptional=5 Very Good = 4 Average = 3 Marginal = 2 1 = FAILURE N/A OR no opportunity to observe

CORE COMPETENCY (See definitions on reverse side) RATING

Patient Care 5 4 3 2 1 N/A

Medical Knowledge 5 4 3 2 1 N/A

Practice-Based Learning & Improvement 5 4 3 2 1 N/A

Professionalism 5 4 3 2 1 N/A

System-Based Practice 5 4 3 2 1 N/A

Interpersonal and Communication Skills 5 4 3 2 1 N/A

Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine 5 4 3 2 1 N/A

OVERALL GRADE 5 4 3 2 1(FAILURE

Evaluator Signature:____________________________________________________ Date:

_______/________/_______

Student Signature: ____________________________________________________ Date:

_______/________/_______

(Ideally at Exit Conference)

(*) DME Signature: _________________________________________________ Date:

_______/________/_______

Please Return to:  Hospital’s Office of Medical Education

OVER 

The Seven Osteopathic Medical Competencies

Physician Competency is a measurable demonstration of suitable or sufficient

knowledge, skill sets, experience, values, and behaviors, that meet established

professional standards, supported by the best available medical evidence, that are in

the best interest of the well-being and health of the patient.

Patient Care: Osteopathic patient care is the ability to effectively determine and

monitor the nature of a patient’s concern or problem; to develop, maintain, and to

bring to closure the therapeutic physician-patient relationship; to appropriately

incorporate osteopathic principles, practices and manipulative treatment; and to

implement effective diagnostic and treatment plans, including appropriate patient

education and follow-up, that are based on best medical evidence.

90

Medical Knowledge: Medical Knowledge is the understanding and

application of biomedical, clinical, epidemiological, biomechanical, and social and

behavioral sciences in the context of patient-centered care.

Practice-Based Learning & Improvement: Practice-Based learning

and improvement is the continuous evaluation of clinical practice utilizing evidence-based

medicine approaches to develop best practices that will result in optimal patient care

outcomes.

Professionalism: Medical professionalism is a duty to consistently demonstrate

behaviors that uphold the highest moral and ethical standards of the osteopathic profession.

This includes a commitment to continuous learning and the exhibition of personal and social

accountability. Medical professionalism extends to those normative behaviors ordinarily

expected in the conduct of medical education, training, research, and practice.

System-Based Practice: System-based practice is an awareness of and

responsiveness to the larger context and system of health care, and the ability to effectively

identify and integrate system resources to provide care that is of optimal value to individuals

and society at large.

Interpersonal & Communication Skills: Interpersonal and

communication skills are written, verbal, and non-verbal behaviors that facilitate

understanding the patient’s perspective. These skills include building the physician-patient

relationship, opening the discussion, gathering information, empathy, listening, sharing

information, reaching agreement on problems and plans, and providing closure. These skills

extend to communication with patients, families, and members of the health care team.

Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine: Osteopathic philosophy is a holistic

approach that encompasses the psychosocial, biomedical, and biomechanical aspects of both

health and disease, and stresses the relationship between structure and function, with

particular regard to the musculoskeletal system.

Definitions Provided by the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners

(NBOME)

91

4. Student feedback (assessment) of courses / Clinical clerkship / PDA project

 Data received on courses and faculty through the newly implemented, innovative

Course / Faculty Assessment program (see below-NYCOM Student Guide for

Curriculum and Faculty Assessment). Students (randomly) assigned (by teams)

to evaluate one course (and associated faculty) during 2-year pre-clinical

curriculum. Outcome of student-team assessment is presented to Curriculum

Committee, in the form of a one-page Comprehensive Report;

 Clerkship Feedback (quantitative and “open-ended” feedback) provided through

“Matchstix” (web-based feedback program): this information is shared with

NYCOM Deans and Clinical Chairs, Hospital Director’s of Medical Education

(DMEs), Hospital Department Chairs and Clerkship Supervisors. Also, the

information is posted on the “web” to assist and facilitate 2nd year students

choosing 3rd year Core Clerkship Sites (transparency). This data is also utilized

via two (2) year comparisons of quantitative data and student feedback shared

with NYCOM Deans & Chairs, as well as Hospital DMEs;

 Clerkship Feedback via PDA: quantitative and open-ended (qualitative) feedback

on all clerkships is collected via student PDA submission. The information is

utilized as a catalyst for clerkship quality enhancement. This data-set is used as a

multimodal quality assessment tool for curricular exposure as well as OMM

integration across all hospitals (including “outside” clerkships) for Patient

Encounters and Educational Activities;

92

 Reports from student focus groups—these reports are based upon in-person group

interviews by a full-time NYCOM Medical Educator and feedback is analyzed in

order to ensure consistency in clerkship education and experiences, as well as for

program improvement indicators;

93

Specific forms/questionnaires utilized to capture the above-detailed information include the

following:

 NYCOM Student Guide for Curriculum and Faculty Assessment

 Clerkship (site) feedback from Clerkship students

 Clinical Clerkship Focus Group Form

 4th Year PDA Feedback Questionnaire

 Student End-of-Semester Program Evaluations (DPC)

 DPC Program Assessment Plan

 Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine (OMM) Assessment Forms

Samples of the forms/questionnaires follow

94

95

Site Feedback

Rotation: Surgery

Site: (*) MAIMONIDES MEDICAL CENTER

This is an anonymous feedback form. No student identification data is transmitted.

Questions marked with * are mandatory.

Section I. Please respond to each statement in this section according to the following

scale.

STRONGLY DISAGREE <-> STRONGLY AGREE

1* There were adequate learning opportunities (teaching patients, diversity of pathology and

diagnostic procedures)

Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree

2* There were opportunities to practice osteopathic diagnosis and therapy

Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree

3* There was adequate supervision and feedback (e.g., reviews of my H&P, progress notes and

clinical skills)

Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree

4* I had the opportunity to perform procedures relevant for my level of training

Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree

5* I was evaluated fairly for my level of knowledge and skills

Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree

6* Attending physicians and/or house staff were committed to teaching

Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree

7* Overall, I felt meaningfully engaged and well integrated with the clinical teams (e.g., given

sufficient patient care responsibilities)

Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree

96

8* The DME and/or clerkship director was responsive to my needs as a student

Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree

9* There were adequate library resources at this facility

Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree

10* A structured program of directed readings and/or journal club was a component of this

rotation.

Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree

11* The lectures were appropriate for this rotation (e.g., quality, quantity and relevance of

topics)

Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree

12* Educationally useful teaching rounds were conducted on a regular basis.

Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree

13* This rotation reflected a proper balance of service and education

Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree

14* This rotation incorporated a psychosocial component in patient care

Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree

15* Overall, I would recommend this rotation to others

Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree

Section II. Psychomotor skills

Indicate the number you performed on an average week during this rotation for each of

the following:

16* History and Physicals

97

17* Osteopathic structural examinations

18* Osteopathic Manipulative Treatments

19* Starting IVs

20* Venipunctures

21* Administering injections

22* Recording notes on medical records

23* Reviewing X-Rays

24* Reviewing EKGs

25* Urinary catherizations

26* Insertion and removal of sutures

27* Minor surgical procedures (assist)

28* Major surgical procedures (assist)

29* Care of dressings and drains

98

30* Sterile field maintenance

Section III

31* Comment on unique STRENGTHS and Positive Features of this rotation

32* Comment on the LIMITATIONS and Negative Features of this rotation

33* Comment on the extent in which the Learning Objectives for the rotation were met (e.g.,

specific topics/patient populations to which you were or not exposed)

Section IV. Please list your clinical instructors with whom you had substantial contact

on this rotation and provide a general rating of their effectiveness as Teachers using the

scale below.

5=EXCELLENT, 4=VERY GOOD, 3=AVERAGE, 2=BELOW AVERAGE,

1=POOR

For example – John Smith – 4

34* List clinical instructors and rating in the box below

To submit your feedback, enter your password below and then click on Submit Feedback button

Submit Feedback

Cancel

99

Focus Groups on Clinical Clerkships

NAME OF HOSPITAL:

LOCATION:

DATE OF SITE VISIT:

The student’s comments on the clinical rotations are as follows:

(Name of Clerkship)

STRENGHTS:

WEAKNESSES:

100

4th Year PDA Feedback Questionnaire

1. Clinic Site

2. Rotation

3. Date

4. There were adequate learning opportunities

5. There were opportunities to practice Osteopathic diagnosis & therapy

6. I was evaluated fairly for my level of knowledge and skills

7. Attending physicians and/or house staff were committed to teaching

8. Overall, I felt meaningfully engaged and well integrated with the clinical teams

9. The DME and/or clerkship director was responsive to my needs as a student

10. This rotation reflected a proper balance of service and education

11. Overall, I would recommend this clerkship to others

12. Comments

13. Strengths/Positive Features of Rotation

14. Limitations/Negative Features of Rotation

15. List and Rate Clinical Instructors

101

Student End-of-Semester Program Evaluations

The DPC Student End-of-Semester Program Evaluation is an assessment of

each course that occurred during the semester and the corresponding faculty

members.

DPC END OF SEMESTER EVALUATION

Directions:

1. Please write in your year of graduation here: .

2. Enclosed you will find a blank scantron sheet.

3. Please make sure that you are using a #2 pencil to fill in your answers.

4. Please fill in the following Test Form information on the Scantron Sheet:

 DPC Class 2011 – Bubble in Test Form A

 DPC Class 2012 – Bubble in Test Form B

5. No other identifying information is necessary.

6. Please complete each of the following numbered sentences throughout

this evaluation using the following responses:

A. Excellent – couldn’t be better

B. Good – only slight improvement possible

C. Satisfactory – about average

D. Fair – some improvement needed

E. Poor – considerable improvement needed

7. There are spaces after each section in which you can write comments.

(When making comments, please know that your responses will be shared with DPC faculty,

Dept. chairs, and deans, as part of ongoing program evaluation.)

BIOPSYCHOSOCIAL SCIENCES COURSE EVALUATION:

102

I. CASE STUDIES COMPONENT

Excellent Good Satisfactory

Fair Poor

1. This course, overall is A B C D E

2. My effort in this course, overall is A B C D E

3. The case studies used in small

group are A B C D E

4. My preparation for each group

session was A B C D E

5. Other available resources for use in

small group are A B C D E

6. Facilitator assessments are A B C D E

7. Self assessments are A B C D E

8. Content Exams – midterm and final

are A B C D E

9. The group process in my group can

be described as A B C D E

10. The wrap-ups in my group were A B C D E

11. The quality of the learning issues

developed by my group was A B C D E

Overall comments on Case Studies

II. STUDENT HOUR COMPONENT:

Excellent Good Satisfactory

Fair Poor

12. The monthly student hours are A B C D E

Overall Comments On The Student Hour

103

III. FACILITATOR RATINGS

Please circle your group number/the name of your group facilitator(s).

Group Facilitators

A Dr. _____________________ and Dr. _______ ______________

B Dr. _____________________ and Dr. ________ ______________

C Dr. _____________________ and Dr. ______________________

D Dr. _____________________ and Dr. _______________________

Please bubble in your response to each of the following items:

Strongly

Agree Agree Disagree Strongly

Disagree

13. Maintained appropriate directiveness 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

14. Supported appropriate group process 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

15. Supported student-directed learning 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

16. Gave appropriate feedback to group 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

17. Ensured that learning issues were

Appropriate 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

18. Overall, these facilitators were

effective 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

Overall Facilitator Comments

(Comments on individual facilitators are welcome)

104

IV. PROBLEM SETS/DISCUSSION SESSIONS COMPONENT

A. Course Evaluation:

Excellent Good Satisfactory

Fair Poor

19. These sessions, overall were A B C D E

20. My effort in these sessions, overall

was A B C D E

21. The organization of these sessions

was A B C D E

22. Handouts in general were A B C D E

Problem Sets/Discussion Sessions Comments

(Please comment as to whether problem sets were too many, too few, too involved.)

105

V. PROBLEM SETS/DISCUSSION SESSIONS COMPONENT

B. Presenter Evaluation:

Excellent Good Satisfactory

Fair Poor

23. The Problem Set topic on

was A B C D E

24. The instructor,

, for the problem set named

in #23 was

A B C D E

25. The Problem Set topic on

was A B C D E

26. The instructor,

, for the problem set named

in #25 was

A B C D E

27. The Problem Set topic on

was A B C D E

28. The instructor,

, for the problem set named

in #27 was

A B C D E

29. The Problem Set topic on

was A B C D E

30. The instructor,

, for the problem set named

in #29 was

A B C D E

31. The Problem Set topic on

was A B C D E

32. The instructor,

, for the problem set named

in #31 was

A B C D E

Problem Sets/Discussion Sessions Comments

(Comments on individual instructors are welcome)

106

VI. ANATOMY COMPONENT

A. Course Evaluation:

Excellent Good Satisfactory

Fair Poor

33. This component, overall was A B C D E

34. My effort in this component was A B C D E

35. My preparation for each lab session

was A B C D E

36. Organization of the component was A B C D E

37. Quizzes were A B C D E

38. Resource Hour / Reviews were A B C D E

Anatomy Component Comments

107

VII. ANATOMY COMPONENT

B. Teaching Evaluation:

Please bubble in your response to each of the following items:

Strongly

Agree Agree Disagree Strongly

Disagree

39. The faculty were available to answer

questions in the lab 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

40. The faculty Initiated student

discussion 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

41. The faculty were prepared for each

lab session 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

42. The faculty gave me feedback on how

I was doing 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

43. The faculty were enthusiastic about

the course 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

44. Overall, the instructors were effective 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

Anatomy Component Comments

(Comments on individual instructors are welcome)

108

CLINICAL SCIENCES COURSE

I. CLINICAL SKILLS LAB COMPONENT

A. Course Evaluation:

Excellent Good Satisfactory

Fair Poor

45. This component, overall was A B C D E

46. My effort in this component was A B C D E

47. My preparation for each lab session

was A B C D E

48. Organization of the component was A B C D E

49. Examinations were A B C D E

50. Handouts/PowerPoints were A B C D E

51. I would rate my physical exam and

history taking skills at this time to

be

A B C D E

Overall Comments on Clinical Skills Component / Individual Labs

(Comments on individual instructors are welcome)

109

I. CLINICAL SKILLS LAB COMPONENT

B. Teaching Evaluation:

Please bubble in your response to each of the following items:

Strongly

Agree Agree Disagree Strongly

Disagree

52. The faculty were available to answer

questions in the lab 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

53. The faculty initiated student

discussion 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

54. The faculty were prepared for each

lab session 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

55. The faculty Gave me feedback on

how I was doing 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

56. The faculty were enthusiastic about

the course 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

57. Overall, the instructors were effective 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

Overall Comments on Clinical Skills Component / Individual Labs

(Comments on individual instructors are welcome)

110

II. OMM COMPONENT

A. Course Evaluation:

Excellent Good Satisfactory

Fair Poor

58. This component, overall was A B C D E

59. My effort in this component was A B C D E

60. My preparation for each lab session

was A B C D E

61. Organization of the component was A B C D E

62. Presentations / Lectures were A B C D E

63. Handouts were A B C D E

64. Quizzes were A B C D E

65. Practical exams were A B C D E

66. Resource Hour / Reviews were A B C D E

Overall Comments on OMM Component / Individual Labs

(Comments on individual instructors are welcome)

111

II. OMM COMPONENT

B. Teaching Evaluation

Please bubble in your response to each of the following items:

Strongly

Agree Agree Disagree Strongly

Disagree

67. The faculty were available to answer

questions in the lab 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

68. The faculty Initiated student

discussion 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

69. The faculty were prepared for each

lab session 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

70. The faculty gave me feedback on how

I was doing 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

71. The faculty were enthusiastic about

the course 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

72. Overall, the instructors were effective 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

Overall Comments on OMM Component / Individual Labs

(Comments on individual instructors are welcome)

112

III. ICC COMPONENT

A. Course Evaluation:

Excellent Good Satisfactory

Fair Poor

73. This component, overall was A B C D E

74. My effort in this component was A B C D E

75. My preparation for each lab session

was A B C D E

76. Organization of this component was A B C D E

77. The helpfulness/usefulness of the

ICC standardized patient

encounters was

A B C D E

78. The helpfulness/usefulness of the

ICC robotic patient encounters was A B C D E

79. Are Clinical Skills laboratory

exercises appropriate for the ICC?

[A] YES [B] NO

A YES B NO – – –

Overall Comments on the ICC Component

(Comments on individual instructors are welcome)

113

IV. CLINICAL PRACTICUM COMPONENT

80. I participated in Clinical Practicum this semester: [A] YES [B] NO

If you answered NO to this question, you have finished this evaluation, if you answered YES,

please continue this questionnaire until the end. Thank you.

A. Course Evaluation

Excellent Good Satisfactory

Fair Poor

81. This component, overall was A B C D E

82. My effort in this component was A B C D E

83. My preparation for each lab session

was A B C D E

84. Organization of this component was A B C D E

85. The helpfulness/usefulness of the

Clinical Practicum was A B C D E

86. The organization of the case

presentations was A B C D E

87. Are Clinical Skills laboratory

exercises appropriate for the

Clinical Practicum?

A YES B NO – – –

Please bubble in your response to each of the following items:

Strongly

Agree

Agree Disagree Strongly

Disagree

88. The case presentation exercise was a

valuable learning experience 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

Overall Comments on Clinical Practicum Course

114

IV. CLINICAL PRACTICUM COMPONENT

B. Mentor Evaluation:

Please bubble in your response to each of the following items:

Strongly

Agree Agree Disagree Strongly

Disagree

89. The preceptor was available to

answer my questions 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

90. I was supported in my interaction

with patients 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

91. Student-directed learning was

supported 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

92. I had appropriate feedback 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

93. Overall, this preceptor/site was

effective 5 (A) 4 (B) 2 (C) 1 (D)

Preceptor Name _______________________

Overall Comments on Clinical Practicum Mentor

(Comments on individual instructors are welcome)

115

DPC: Program Assessment Plan

I. Pre matriculated Evaluation – What determines that an applicant will pick the DPC

program?

 Comparison of the students who chose the LDB program vs. the DPC program with

regard to the following outcome measures:

 GPA scores (overall, science)

 MCAT scores

 Gender

 Age

 Race

 College size

 College Geographic location

 Prior PBL exposure

 OMM understanding

 Research Background

 Volunteer Work

 Employment Experience

 Graduate Degree

 Scholarships/Awards

II. Years at NYCOM – How do we evaluate if the DPC program is accomplishing its goals

while the students are at NYCOM?

 Comparison of Facilitator Assessments for each term, to monitor student growth

 Comparison of Clinical Practicum Mentor Evaluations from Term 2 and Term 3, to

evaluate the student’s clinical experience progress

 Comparison of Content exam scores from terms 1 through 4.

 Comparison of entrance questionnaire (administered during first week of medical

school) responses to corresponding exit questionnaire administered at the end of year

4

 Evaluation of the Student DPC End-of-Term Evaluations

 Comparison of the following measures to those outcomes achieved by the students in

the LDB program:

 OMM scores

116

DPC: Program Assessment Plan

 Anatomy scores

 ICC PARS scores

 ICC OSCE scores

 Summer research

 Summer Volunteerism

 Research effort (publications, abstracts, posters, presentations)

 Shelf-exams

 COMLEX I, II, III scores and pass rate

 Fellowships (Academic, Research)

III. Post Graduate Training Practice – What happens to the DPC student once they leave

NYCOM? How to they compare to those students who matriculated through the LDB

program?

 Comparison of the following measures to those outcomes achieved by the students in

the LDB program:

 Internships

 Residencies

 Fellowships

 Specialty (medicine)

 Specialty board certifications

 AOA membership

 AMA membership

 Publications

 Research

 Teaching

117

OMM Assessment Forms

118

119

5. COMLEX USA Level I, Level II CE & PE, and Level III data (NBOME)

a) First-time and overall pass rates and mean scores;

b) Comparison to national averages;

c) Comparison to college (NYCOM) national ranking.

Report provided by Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

120

6. Residency match rates and overall placement rate

Data compiled as received from the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) and

the National Residency Match Program (NRMP).

Report provided by Associate Dean for Clinical Education

121

7. Feedback from (AACOM) Graduation Questionnaire

Annual survey report received from AACOM comparing NYCOM graduates

responses to numerous questions/categories (including demographics, specialty

choice, overall perception of pre-doctoral training, indebtedness, and more) to nationwide

osteopathic medical school graduating class responses.

122

Specific forms/questionnaires utilized to capture the above-detailed information include the

following:

 AACOM Survey of Graduating Seniors

Samples of the forms/questionnaires follow

123

124

125

126

127

128

129

130

131

132

133

134

135

136

137

138

139

140

141

8. Completion rates (post-doctoral programs)

Percent of NYCOM graduates completing internship/residency training programs.

Report provided by Office of Program Evaluation and Assessment

142

9. Specialty certification and licensure

Data compiled from state licensure boards and other specialty certification

organization (board certification) on NYCOM graduates.

Report provided by Office of Program Evaluation and Assessment

143

10. Career choices and geographic practice location

Data includes practice type (academic, research, clinical, and so on) and practice

location. Data obtained from licensure boards, as well as NYCOM Alumni survey.

Report provided by Office of Program Evaluation and Assessment

144

11. Alumni Survey

Follow up survey periodically sent to alumni requesting information on topics

such as practice location, specialty, residency training, board certification and

so on.

145

Specific forms/questionnaires utilized to capture the above-detailed information include the

following:

 Alumni Survey

Samples of the forms/questionnaires follow

146

ALUMNI SURVEY

NAME

LAST FIRST NYCOM CLASS YEAR

HOME ADDRESS

PRACTICE ADDRESS

HOME PHONE ( ) OFFICE PHONE ( )

E-MAIL ADDRESS

________________________________ _______________________________ _______________________

INTERNSHIP HOSPITAL RESIDENCY HOSPITAL FIELD OF STUDY

FELLOWSHIPS COMPLETED:

CERTIFICATIONS YOU HOLD:

IF SPOUSE IS ALSO A NYCOM ALUMNUS, PLEASE INDICATE SPOUSE’S NAME AND CLASS YEAR:

EXCLUDING INTERNSHIP, RESIDENCY AND FELLOWSHIP, HAVE YOU EARNED ANY ADDITIONAL ACADEMIC DEGREES OR CERTIFICATES BEYOND

YOUR MEDICAL DEGREE (I.E., MPH, MBA, MHA, PHD, MS)? (PLEASE LIST)

CURRENT PRACTICE STATUS: FULL-TIME PRACTICE___ PART-TIME PRACTICE _____ INTERN/RESIDENCY _____ RETIRED/NOT PRACTICING _____

147

What specialty do you practice most

frequently? (Choose one)

 Allergy and Immunology

 Anesthesiology

 Cardiology

 Colorectal Surgery

 Dermatology

 Emergency Medicine

 Endocrinology

 Family Practice

 Gastroenterology

 Geriatrics

 Hematology

 Infectious Diseases

 Internal Medicine

 Neruology

 Neonatology

 Nephrology

 Neurology

 Nuclear Medicine

 Obstetrics & Gynecology

 Occupational Medicine

 Ophthalmology

 Oncology

 Otolaryngology

 Orthopedic Surgery

 Psychiatry

 Pediatrics

 Plastic/Recon. Surgery

 Physical Medicine/Rehab

 Pathology

 Pulmonary Medicine

 Radiology

 Rheumatology

 Surgery (general)

 Thoracic Surgery

 Radiation Therapy

 Urology

 Other (Please specify)

____________________

Current military status (if applicable):

 Active Duty

 Inactive reserve

 Active Reserve

What is the population of the

geographic area of your practice?

(Choose one)

 5,000,000 +

 1,000,000 – 4,999,999

 500,000 – 999,999

 250,000 – 499,999

 100,000 – 249,999

 50,000 – 99,999

 25,000 – 49,999

 10,000 – 24,999

 5,000 – 9,999

 Less than 5,000

How would you describe this

geographic area? (Choose one)

 Inner City

 Urban

 Suburban

 Small Town – Rural

 Small town – industrial

Other ______________________

What functions do you perform in

your practice? (check all that apply)

 Preventive care/patient education

 Acute care

 Routine/non-acute care

 Consulting

 Supervisory/managerial responsibilities

 Research

 Teaching

 Hospital Rounds

What best describes the setting in

which you spend the most time ?

 Intensive Care Unit of Hospital

 Inpatient Unit of Hospital (not ICU/CCU)

 Outpatient Unit of Hospital

 Hospital Emergency Room

 Hospital Operating Room

 Freestanding Urgent Care Center

 Freestanding Surgical Facility

 Nursing Home or LTC Facility

 Solo practice physician office

 Single Specialty Group practice physician

office

 Multiple Specialty Group practice physician

office

 University Student Health facility

 School-based Health center

 HMO facility

 Rural Health Clinic

 Inner-city Health Center

 Other Community Health Center

 Other Freestanding Outpatient facility

 Correctional facility

 Industrial facility

 Mobile Health Unit

 Other (Please specify)

__________________________________

Do you access medical information

via the internet ?

 Never

 Sometimes

 Often

What percent of your time is spent in primary

care? (family medicine or gen. internal medicine)

 0%

 1 – 25%

 25 – 50%

 50 – 75%

 75 – 100%

What percent of your practice is outpatient?

 0%

 1 – 25%

 25 – 50%

 50 – 75%

 75 – 100%

148

Do you engage in any of the following

activities? (check all that apply)

 Professional organization

leadership position

 Volunteer services in the

community

 School or team physician

 Free medical care

 Leadership in church,

congregation

 Local government

 Speaking on medical

topics to community

groups

How many CME programs or other

professional training sessions did you

attend last year?

 none

 1-5

 5-10

 10-15

 more than 15

Have you ever done any

of the following?

 Author or co-author

a professional paper

 Contribute to an article

 Direct a research project

 Participate in clinical

research

 Present a lecture at a

professional meeting or

CME program

 Serve on a panel

discussion at a

professional meeting

How often do you read

medical literature regarding

new research findings?

 Rarely

 Several times a year

 Monthly

 Weekly

 Daily

How frequently do you apply

osteopathic concepts into

patient care?

 Never

 Rarely

 Often

 Always

In your practice do you employ any of

the following?

(check all that apply)

 Structural examination or

musculoskeletal

considerations in

diagnosis

 Indirect OMT techniques

 High Velocity OMT

 Myofascial OMT

 Cranial OMT

 Palpatory diagnosis

Please indicate how important each of the following skills

has been in your success as a physician, and how well

NYCOM prepared you in that skill.

Biomedical science knowledge base

Clinical skills

Patient educator skills

Empathy and compassion for patients

Understanding of cultural differences

Osteopathic philosophy

Clinical decision making

Foundation of ethical standards

Ability to communicate with other health care providers

Ability to communicate with patients and families

Knowing how to access community resources

Ability to understand and apply new medical information

Understanding of the payor/reimbursement system

How important to my practice



Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

How well NYCOM prepared me



Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

149

Ability to search and retrieve needed information

Manipulative treatment skill

Ability to use medical technology

Diagnostic skill

Skill in preventive care

Understanding of public health issues & the public health

system

Professionalism

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak

Strong  Moderate Weak 

Please return to:

NYCOM of NYIT, Office of Alumni Affairs

Northern Boulevard, Serota Bldg., Room 218

Old Westbury, New York 11568

or

fax to (516) 686-3891 or (516) 686-3822

as soon as possible.

Thank you for your cooperation!

150

NYCOM Benchmarks

1-Applicant Pool

Benchmark: To maintain relative standing among Osteopathic Medical Colleges based on

the number of applicants.

2-Admissions Profile

Benchmark: Maintain or improve current admissions profile based on academic criteria such

as MCAT, GPA, or Colleges attended.

3-Academic Attrition Rates

Benchmark: To maintain or improve our current 3% Academic Attrition rate

4-Remediation rates (pre-clinical years)

Benchmark: A 2% a year reduction in the students remediating in pre-clinical years.

5-COMLEX USA Scores

Benchmark: Top quartile in the National Ranking of 1st time pass rate and Mean Score.

6-Students entering Osteopathic Graduate Medical Education (OGME)

Benchmark: Maintain or improve the current OGME placement.

7-Graduates entering Primary Care (PC) 12

Benchmark: Maintain or improve the current Primary Care placement.

8-Career Data -Licensure (within 3 years, post-graduate), Board Certification , Geographic

Practice, and Scholarly achievements.

Benchmark: TBD

12 Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Pediatrics

151

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Gonnella, J.S., Hojat, M., & Veloski, J.J. Jefferson Longitudinal Study of Medical Education.

Retrieved December 17, 2008, from http://jdc.jefferson.edu/jlsme/1

Hernon, P. & Dugan, R.E. (2004). Outcomes Assessment in Higher Education. Libraries

Unlimited: Westport, CT

152

APPENDICES

153

NEUROLOGICAL EXAMINATION

©2009 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine 011509

1 Assess Cranial Nerve I

– Olfactory

Examiner checks for

patient’s sense of smell by,

e.g. coffee, soap,

peppermint, orange peels,

etc.

2 Assess Cranial Nerve II

– Optic: Assessing Visual

Fields by Confrontation

􀂃 Examiner stands at

approximate eye-level

with patient, making eye

contact.

􀂃 Patient is then asked to

return examiner’s gaze

e.g. by saying “Look at

me.”

􀂃 Examiner starts by

placing his / her hands

outside the patient’s field

of vision, lateral to head.

􀂃 With fingers wiggling (so

patient can easily see

them) the examiner

brings his / her fingers

into the patient’s field of

vision.

Hands diagonal

Or, hands horizontal

􀂃 Examiner must ask the patient “Tell me when you see my

fingers.”

􀂃 Assess upper, middle and lower fields, bilaterally.

154

NEUROLOGICAL EXAMINATION

©2009 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine 011509

3 Assess Cranial Nerve II –

Optic: Accessing Visual

Acuity

􀂃 For ICC purposes,

handheld Rosenbaum

Pocket Screener (eye

chart)

􀂃 NOTE: Use handheld

Snellen eye chart if

patient stand 20’ from

the chart

􀂃 Ask patient to cover one

eye while testing the

other eye

􀂃 Rosenbaum eye chart

is held in good light

approximately 14” from

eye

􀂃 Determine the smallest

line of print from which

patient can read more

than half the letters

􀂃 The patient’s visual

acuity score is recorded

as two numbers, e.g.

“20/30” where the top

number is the distance

the patient is from the

chart and the bottom

number is the distance

the normal eye can

read that line.

􀂃 Repeat with the other

eye

155

NEUROLOGICAL EXAMINATION

©2009 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine 011509

4 Assessing Cranial Nerves II and III

– Optic and Oculomotor:

Assessing direct and Consensual

Reactions

􀂃 Examiner asks the patient to look into the

distance, then shines a light obliquely into

each pupil twice to check both the direct

reaction (pupillary constriction in the same

eye) and consensual reaction (pupillary

constriction in the opposite eye).

􀂃 Must be assessed bilaterally.

5 Assessing Cranial Nerves II and III – Optic

and Oculomotor: Assessing Near Reaction

and Near Response

􀂃 Assessed in normal room light, testing one

eye at a time.

􀂃 Examiner holds a finger, pencil, etc. about

10 cm. from the patient’s eye.

􀂃 Asks the patient to look alternately at the

finger or pencil and then into the distance.

􀂃 Note pupillary constriction with near focus.

Close focus

Distant focus

156

NEUROLOGICAL EXAMINATION

©2009 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine 011509

6 Assessing Cranial Nerve III

– Oculomotor: Assessing Convergence

􀂃 Examiner asks the patient to follow his / her

finger or pencil as he / she moves it in

toward the bridge of the nose to within about

5 to 8 centimeters.

􀂃 Converging eyes normally follow the object

to within 5 – 8 cm. of the nose.

7 Assessing Cranial Nerve III, IV and VI

– Oculomotor, Trochlear And Abducens:

Assessing Extra Ocular Muscle Movement

􀂃 Examiner assesses muscle movements in at

least 6 positions of gaze by tracing, for

example, an “H pattern” with the hand and

asking the patient to follow the hand with

their eyes without turning the head.

157

NEUROLOGICAL EXAMINATION

©2009 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine 011509

8 Assessing Cranial Nerve V

– Trigeminal (Sensory) Ophthalmic Maxillary

Examiner assesses sensation in 3

sites:

􀂙 Ophthalmic

􀂙 Maxillary

􀂙 Mandibular

􀂃 Examiner may use fingers,

cotton, etc. for the

assessment.

􀂃 Assess bilaterally.

Mandibular

9 Assessing Cranial Nerve V

– Trigeminal (Motor)

􀂃 Examiner asks the patient to

move jaw his or her jaw from

side to side

OR

􀂃 Examiner palpates the

masseter muscles and asks

patient to clinch his / her teeth.

􀂃 Note strength of muscle

contractions.

OR

158

NEUROLOGICAL EXAMINATION

©2009 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine 011509

10 Assessing Cranial

Nerve VII – Facial:

Motor Testing

Examiner asks patient to

perform any 4 of the

following 6 exams:

􀂃 Raise both eyebrows

􀂃 Close eyes tightly,

then try to open

against examiner’s

resistance

􀂃 Frown

􀂃 Smile

􀂃 Show upper and lower

teeth

􀂃 Puff out cheeks

Note any weakness or

asymmetry.

Raise eyebrows Opening eyes against resistance

Frown Smile

Show teeth Puff cheeks

159

NEUROLOGICAL EXAMINATION

©2009 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine 011509

11

Assess Cranial Nerve VIII

– Acoustic

Weber test – for

lateralization

􀂃 Use a 512 Hz or 1024

Hz turning fork.

􀂃 Examiner starts the fork

vibrating e.g. by tapping

it on the opposite hand,

leg, etc.

􀂃 Base of the tuning fork

placed firmly on top of

the patient’s head.

􀂃 Patient asked “Where

does the sound appear

to be coming from?”

(normally it will be

sensed in the midline).

160

NEUROLOGICAL EXAMINATION

©2009 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine 011509

12 Assessing Cranial Nerve

VIII – Acoustic

Rinne test – to compare

air and bone conduction

􀂃 Use a 512 Hz or 1024

Hz turning fork.

􀂃 Examiner starts the fork

vibrating, e.g. by

tapping it on the

opposite hand, leg, etc.

􀂃 Base of fork placed

against the mastoid

bone behind the ear.

􀂃 Patient asked to say

when he / she no longer

hears the sound

Mastoid Bone

􀂃 When sound no longer

heard, examiner moves

the tuning fork (without

re-striking it) and holds

it near the patient’s ear

and ask if he / she can

hear the vibration.

􀂃 Examiner must vibrate

the tuning fork again for

the second ear.

􀂃 Bilateral exam.

NOTE: (AC>BC): Air

conduction greater than

bone conduction.

Ear

161

NEUROLOGICAL EXAMINATION

©2009 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine 011509

13 Assessing Cranial Nerve VIII –

– Gross Auditory Acuity

􀂃 Examiner asks patient to

occlude (cover) one ear.

􀂃 Examiner then whispers

words or numbers into nonoccluded

ear from

approximately 2 feet away.

􀂃 Asks patient to repeat

whispered words or

numbers.

􀂃 Compare bilaterally.

OR

􀂃 Examiner asks patient to

occlude (cover) one ear.

􀂃 Examiner rubs thumb and

forefinger together next to

patient’s non-occluded ear

and asks the patient if the

sound is heard.

􀂃 Compare bilaterally.

162

NEUROLOGICAL EXAMINATION

©2009 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine 011509

14 Assessing Cranial Nerve IX

and X – Glossopharyngeal

and Vagus: Motor Testing

􀂃 First, examiner asks the

patient to swallow.

Swallowing

􀂃 Next, patient asked to say

‘aah’ and examiner

observes for symmetrical

movement of the soft

palate or a deviation of the

uvula.

􀂃 OPTIONAL: Use a light

source to help visualize

palate and uvula.

NOTE: sensory component of

cranial nerves IX and X is

testing for the “gag reflex”

Saying “Aah”

163

NEUROLOGICAL EXAMINATION

©2009 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine 011509

15 Assessing Cranial Nerve XI

– Spinal Accessory:

Motor Testing

􀂃 Examiner asks the patient to

shrug his / her shoulders up

against the examiner’s

hands. Apply resistance.

􀂃 Note strength and

contraction of trapezius

muscles.

􀂃 Next, patient asked to turn

his or her head against

examiner’s hand. Apply

resistance.

􀂃 Observe the contraction of

the opposite sternocleidomastoid

muscle.

􀂃 Assess bilaterally.

164

NEUROLOGICAL EXAMINATION

©2009 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine 011509

16 Assessing Cranial Nerve

XII – Hypoglossal:

Motor Testing

􀂃 First, examiner inspects

patient’s tongue as it

lies on the floor of the

mouth.

􀂃 Note any asymmetry,

atrophy or

fasciculations.

􀂃 Next, patient asked to

protrude the tongue.

􀂃 Note any asymmetry,

atrophy or deviations

from the midline.

􀂃 Finally, patient asked to

move the tongue from

side to side.

􀂃 Note any asymmetry of

the movement.

Inspect tongue Protruding Tongue

Side to Side Movement

165

NEUROLOGICAL EXAMINATION

©2009 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine 011509

17 Assessing Lower Extremities –

Motor Testing

With patient in supine position, test

bilaterally

􀂃 Test flexion of the hip by placing

your hand on patient’s thigh, and

ask them to raise his / her leg

against resistance.

􀂃 Test extension of the hip by

having patient push posterior

thigh against your hand

CONTINUED

166

NEUROLOGICAL EXAMINATION

©2009 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine 011509

18 Assessing Lower Extremities –

Motor Testing

With patient in seated position, test

bilaterally

􀂃 Test adduction of the hip by

placing hands firmly between the

knees, and asking them to bring

the knees together

􀂃 Test abduction of the hip by

placing hands firmly outside the

knees, and asking patient to

spread their legs against

resistance

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19 Assessing Upper Extremities –

Motor Testing

􀂃 Examiner asks patient to pull (flex)

and push (extend) the arms against

the examiner’s resistance.

􀂃 Bilateral exam.

Flexion

Extension

20 Assessing Lower Extremities –

Motor Testing

􀂃 Examiner asks the patient to pull

(flex) and push (extend) the legs

against the examiner’s resistance.

􀂃 Bilateral exam.

Flexion

Extension

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21 Assessing Lower Extremities –

Motor Testing

􀂃 Examiner asks patient to dorsiflex

and plantarflex the ankle against

resistance

􀂃 Compare bilaterally

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22 Assessing the Biceps Reflex

􀂃 Examiner partially flexes patient’s

arm.

􀂃 Strike biceps tendon with reflex

hammer (pointed or flat end) with

enough force to elicit a reflex, but not

so much to cause patient discomfort.

OPTIONAL: Examiner places the thumb

or finger firmly on biceps tendon with the

pointed end of reflex hammer only.

􀂃 Reflexes must be assessed

bilaterally.

􀂃 Examiner must produce a reflex for

credit.

OR

23 Assessing the Triceps Reflex

􀂃 Examiner flexes the patient’s arm at

the elbow, and then taps the triceps

tendon with reflex hammer.

􀂃 Reflexes must be assessed

bilaterally.

􀂃 Examiner must produce a reflex for

credit.

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24 Assessing the Brachioradialis

Reflex

􀂃 With the patient’s hand resting

in a relaxed position, e.g. on a

table, his / her lap or supported

by examiner’s arm, the

examiner strikes the radius

about 1 or 2 inches above the

wrist with the reflex hammer.

􀂃 Reflexes must be assessed

bilaterally.

􀂃 Examiner must produce a reflex

for credit.

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25 Assessing the Patellar Tendon Reflex

􀂃 First, patient asked to sit with their legs

dangling off the exam table.

􀂃 Reflexes assessed by striking the

patient’s patellar tendon with a reflex

hammer on skin.

􀂃 Reflexes must be assessed bilaterally.

􀂃 Examiner must produce a reflex for

credit.

OPTIONS:

􀂃 Examiner can place his / her hand on

the on patient’s quadriceps, but this is

optional.

􀂃 Patient’s knees can be crossed.

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25 Assessing the Achilles

Reflex

􀂃 Examiner dorsiflexes the

patient’s foot at the ankle

􀂃 Achilles tendon struck with

the reflex hammer on skin,

socks completely off

(removed at the direction

of the examiner).

􀂃 Reflexes must be

assessed bilaterally.

􀂃 Examiner must produce a

reflex for credit.

173

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26 Assessing the Plantar, or Babinski,

Response

􀂃 Examiner strokes the lateral aspect of

the sole from the heel to the ball of

the foot, curving medially across the

ball, with an object such as the end of

a reflex hammer.

􀂃 On skin, socks completely off

(removed at the direction of the

examiner).

􀂃 Assessment must be done bilaterally

􀂃 Note movement of the toes (normally

toes would curl downward).

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27 Assessing Rapid

Alternating Movements

Pronate Supinate

Examiner must do all three

assessments for credit:

􀂃 Examiner directs the

patient to pronate and

supinate one hand

rapidly on the other.

Touching Thumbs Rapidly 􀂃 Patient directed to

touch his / her thumb

rapidly to each finger

on same hand,

bilaterally.

Slapping Thighs Rapidly

􀂃 Patient directed to slap

his / her thigh rapidly

with the back side of

the hand, and then with

the palm side of the

hand, bilaterally.

175

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29 Assessing Finger-to-Nose

Movements

􀂃 Examiner directs the patient to touch

the examiner’s finger with his or her

finger, and then to place his or her

finger on their nose.

􀂃 Examiner moves his / her finger

randomly during multiple movements.

176

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30 Assessing Gait

Examiner asks patient to perform the

following:

Walk, turn and come back

􀂃 Note imbalance, postural asymmetry,

type of gait (e.g. shuffling, walking on

toes, etc.), swinging of the arms, and

how patient negotiates turns.

Heel-to-toe (tandem walking)

􀂃 Note an ataxia not previously obvious

Shallow knee bend

􀂃 Note difficulties here suggest

proximal weakness (extensors of

hip), weakness of the quadriceps (the

extensor of the knee), or both.

177

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31 Performing the Romberg Test

􀂃 Examiner directs the patient to stand

with feet together, eyes closed for

at least 20 seconds without support.

􀂃 During this test, examiner must stand

behind the patient to provide support

in case the patient loses his / her

balance.

32 Testing for Pronator Drift

􀂃 Examiner directs the patient to stand

with eyes closed, simultaneously

extending both arms, with palms

turned upward, for at least 20

seconds.

􀂃 During this test, examiner must stand

behind the patient to provide support

in case the patient loses his / her

balance.

178

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SPECIAL TESTING

1 Sensory Testing

􀂃 First, examiner

demonstrates what

sharp vs. dull means by

brushing the patient

with a soft object, e.g. a

cotton ball or smooth

end of tongue

depressor, and a semisharp

object, e.g.

broken end tongue

depressor.

􀂃 Examiner performs this

test on arms and legs

bilaterally by randomly

brushing the patient’s

arms and legs with the

soft and semi-sharp

objects, e.g. a cotton

ball, semi-sharp object,

etc..

􀂃 Patient directed to keep

his / her eyes closed

during the examination

as he or she identifies

sharp vs. dull on skin.

􀂃 Bilateral exam, upper

and lower extremities.

179

TASKFORCE MEMBERS

John R. McCarthy, Ed.D. Associate Director, Clerkship Education

Pelham Mead, Ed.D. Director, Faculty Development

Mary Ann Achziger, M.S. Associate Dean, Student Affairs

Felicia Bruno, M.A. Assistant Dean, Student Administrative

Services/Alumni Affairs/Continuing Education

Claire Bryant, Ph.D. Assistant Dean, Preclinical Education

Leonard Goldstein, DDS, PH.D. Director, Clerkship Education

Abraham Jeger, Ph.D. Associate Dean, Clinical Education

Rodika Zaika, M.S. Director, Admissions

Ron Portanova, Ph.D. Associate Dean, Academic Affairs

180

Featured

The Future of the College, Secondary and Elementary Classroom 2020+.

Due to the coronavirus Education in College and other levels will never be the same. Protection against the coronavirus and future pandemic viruses will require Social Distancing and the wearing of face masks to prevent spreading of a virus from one student to another or to the teacher. I have a solution for Elementary, Secondary and College schools to still have classrooms with live students instead of complete online courses. The average Secondary school grades 7-12 usually has 32 student except in some States it may rise to 45 in a classroom to one teacher. To allow for social distancing in the future the number of students in a classroom is going to have to drop from 32 to half that amount or 16 students.

This change would impact the Teacher contracts and agreements with the teacher Unions. Instead of having 8 classes a day of which teachers teach five, the new norm will be twice that number or 16 short classes a day. Short classes would be twenty minutes long instead of the usual 50 minutes. Teachers will have to teach ten short classes a day. Department chairpersons who use to be excused for teaching several classes a day would have to return to a full teaching regiment of 16 classes a day.

Online in school classes can be made available to help make the new curriculum easier to apply. Music auditoriums are the largest room in most schools next to the gyms. In auditoriums student could sit every other seat for social distancing with their own laptop or iPad and log on to the online course they were assigned for that period.

Lunch or cafeteria would have to change to allow social distancing . Every other seating might not work, so chairs might have to be placed in hallways near the cafeteria. Schools in warm climates could have an expanded outdoor picnic area with plenty of extra permanent seating installed.

Online course can supplement in class courses with support and guidance after school at home.

In College money walks and money talks. College Presidents will be tempted to go the all class online route to save massive amounts of money, while at the same time charging tuition to students who log on from home. Dormitories could become problem as the students at UCSD have complained, “why should they pay for a dorm or apartment when they can log on from home? At the NY College of Osteopathic medicine where I worked as. Director of Faculty Development and Assessment they had streaming for all lectures. The lucky thing is that only had two lectures going on at the same time. If a University were to apply instant streaming of all lectures and classrooms the cost would be prohibited due to the need for massive computer server storage space. The down side of streaming other than cost is that the students did not come to the lectures and instead remained at home with a cup of coffee and a donut. The administration at the NY College of Osteopathic medicine could not figure out how to get the students to attend the lectures. The solution was simple. Stop streaming the lectures and handing out of lecture notes in advance. Online course can be bought from third party companies or developed over time with the existing faculty. The problem there is intellectual property rights. Does the Professor had full rights to the classes and curriculum they write and teach or does the University or College have the full property rights to the recorded video copies of the lectures? That depends on the employment contract the Professors sign when they are hired. If they agree to give the University or College full legal rights to replay a Professor’s lectures for eternity than the Professor has no rights. Online courses save Colleges and Universities millions of dollars by not having to provide classroom space or pay a live professor to teach the course.

Some Universities provide a Professor at the beginning of the course and at the end for the final exam and the rest of the course is online. Blackboard is an online administrative system that I was certified and trained in that makes online teaching easy with computer testing, online grading reporting, lock boxes to record when an assignment is handed in onetime and the full curriculum can be posted in advance. Some textbook companies will provide the full text of their books to be uploaded to Blackboard for students to read and not have to pay for an expensive textbook.

Obviously the human interaction between student and teacher is going to suffer. There might be a decline in Teachers due to the new non personal online teaching approach? One big glitch is what happens when the servers go down? No server, no internet, no classrooms broadcast. Hacking will be a major problem and colleges, schools and universities will have to learn how to protect their online systems.

E-mailing a professor is always going to be risky if the student can upload a virus or deliver a link or app that tracks a Professors keyboard. Protected institution e-mails are the only way to prevent this.

Will the online system come the fall of 2020 be good? Probably not because schools have not had the time to train their teachers how to teach online. Early Kindergarten and first grade students will need software that is good for their age level. Who is to pay for these iPads or laptops, the district or college or the student. Many students come from poor families that cannot afford an iPad. They will need financial assistance to secure an iPad and the training how to use one on cds or dvds.

The shorter class time is actually a plus for student with a short attention span. It makes teaching more concentrated. Teachers tend to blab a lot and this will teach them to be concise. Online projects must be completed in 20 minutes.

Physical Education is more essential than ever as an outlet from being cooped up all day and for character development. Online instruction is not a good venue for character development. Good sportsmanship carries over into adult life and provides guidelines for interaction with others in sports. Learning to lose as well as win and profit from losses to eventually win says a lot about Physical Education. We live in an age of overeating students who are so obese they cannot do many things like run or hike. They run out of breath when walking or riding a bike. They are made fun of by their peers. Physical Education will teach students what they cannot learn on a computer. Live body practice is a great way to teach a person’s muscles how to coordinate a skill or sport. Just watching on a computer is not the same. Muscles have memory and the more you repeat a skill, the better you become using that skill.

This is only the beginning of the discussion. Next time the mathematics of setting up a school master schedule with 20 minute classes and 16 sections a day.

Dr. Pelham Mead, June 2020

My Best Ten Screen script Concepts

by Dr. Pelham Mead

My Ten best High Concepts are: Proseries 60- Pelham Mead

1- Solar Space Pirate– Jake Johnson is an international playboy, and Hawk Space Academy drop-out who reunites with his ex-girlfriend, Veronica Green, from the Academy, and helps her to chase down a Space pirate, Count Von Wertz, who uses a stolen Solar Sailing Space ship called the Green dragon to intercept gold ore cargo space ships traveling from Mars to Earth.
2- I Saved President Lincoln– Based on the true story of  Kate Warne, the first female Pinkerton agent in history, who discovers a plot to assassinate President Elect Abraham Lincoln, and helps to convince President Elect Lincoln to change his train schedule to avoid being killed.
3-Don’t be Square– A story about teaching junior high in the 1960’s and 1970’s amid all the social issues of the civil rights movement, free drug era, free sex era, and the conflict between the administration and the teachers.
4– Captain Retro– An autistic young man plans for, and wins the Powerball lottery for four million dollars, and hopes to become a Super-hero, but that is not in the cards for his future.
5-The Glaive of Light (Sword of Light)- A fantasy story set in Celtia, Ireland, 100 b.c. where a small person, Kenkenny, becomes the Keeper of the Glaive of Light by the Good and Bad Gods and sent on a mission to find a good person of pure heart to use the Glaive for the good of mankind.
6– The Personal Diary of Anne of Cleves– A personal diary of one of the most famous Queens of England and how she survived not getting her head cut off by King Henry VIII.
7- The Seabury Chronicles– A modern day Genealogist and College Professor attempts to track down the personal secretary of his great, great, great Grandfather who lost millions in negotiable bonds when the secretary stole all the bonds, disappeared and was never caught. He takes revenge on the descendants of the secretary when he discovers where they are living.
8– A Teacher Goes to War– Based on a true story, a College Professor from Maine, with no military training, joins the Northern Army in the Civil War, only to find himself in the middle of the Battle of Gettysberg defending Little Round Top Hill.
9-Sister Angelina CIA Nun– Based on the real murder of three Nuns in Burundi, Africa, an Ex-Nun is hired by the CIA, and the Vatican Holy See to investigate the murder of three Nuns in Burundi, Africa from inside the Kamenge convent.
10- Destiny- A Robot self manned space ship heads to the Alpha Centuri system with specimens of the best sperms and eggs mankind could offer to replant a new population on another planet, only to get turned around in a black hole in space, and sent back to Earth in another time. The Robot following its Prime Directive and is confused, and attempts instead, to fertilize major leaders in history to change their original time line.
 
 
 
 
 
 

Professors that Graduate from my Teacher Learning Center tutoring in 2001-2002 at the College of Mount Saint Vincent.

The Castle and Admissions center on the campus of the College of Mount Saint Vincent
DR. Mead
Dr. Pelham Mead III in my Columbia University Doctoral Robes
college logo
student Graduation 2002
Dr. Susan Apold 2002, and Dr. Kerrigan, Chemistry
Kathy, Barbara and Dr. Kerrigan
Smart Classroom teaching
Sister Pat teaching in a Smart Classroom 2002
John the Music Professor and College organist 2002
Sister Edward dressed up as Santa at 2002 Christmas Party
Teaching Biology
Professor Pat Grove, Biology teacher and technology supporter
Kathy and Pel Mead at Graduation 2001
Two Biology professors and a Priest
Bernadette, Professor Sociology and Py Live Sun, TLC secretary 2002
Teaching Assistant Christine working with Professor Kathy Flaherty in the TLC room.
Professor Arlene Moliterno teaching in a Smart Classroom with animated Powerpoint slides.
Nursing snack room converted into a Smart Classroom 4th floor annex, College of Mount Saint Vincent
Py Liv Sun , TLC secretary working hard in the TLC
Dr. Mead and Sister Edward
Fran, Director of Communications 2002
Professors waiting for Graduation 2002
college Provost 2002 Dr. Greene
The first Professor to teach in a Smart Classroom rm. 310
TLC web site the College of Mount Saint Vincent
Professors chatting before Graduation 2002
Bob Coleman, Dean of Communications 2002 Christmas party
President Flynn singing at the first Christmas party 2002
John, Py Liv, Christine and Pel Mead 2002
The Biology Lecture hall after remodeling as a Smart classroom thanks to the Title V grant funds. Note the large electric screen and the wall mounted TV in the background. WIFI was also installed as well as a new ceiling projector.

The College

By Dr. Pelham Mead

The College of St. George of Staten Island

Outline

  1. Introduction

Each and every College and University in the United States whether a Catholic College or Private or Public College always has something to hide. It seems to be standard procedure to sweep problems under the rug rather than deal with the problems in an honest and outright manner. Sadly, faculty and students suffer in the end from the indiscretions of the Presidents, and administrators. When monies are stolen from accounts and the person is caught, most Colleges deal with it internally so as not to let the story get into the Newspapers and produce a bad image of the College. Colleges and Universities are often afraid of the impact of a bad story and how it will affect their alumni contributions. Their justification is when a major bad story breaks that puts the College of University in a bad light; there is a domino effect as to public opinion and alumni opinion. Colleges or Universities are afraid that alumni will stop making contributions to the school because of bad story of embezzlement, violence on campus, child sexual abuse, administrative misdeeds, and other negative stories.

            Take for instance the case of Joe Paterno the Football coach at Penn State University shows that he reported a case of suspected sex abuse of young boys by an assistant coach to his superiors and they in turn swept the problem under the carpet until all hell broke loose in the fall of 2010 and the story came to the surface when one or more victims told their story to the Police and the Newspapers. The story went viral and Penn State was put in a very poor light nationally and internationally.  The first effect of this poor image would be alumni concern and a sudden decrease of alumni contributions. Some alumni are such large contributors that they often have great leverage with the University Trustees. In the Penn State situation the Trustees needed to exercise  “
damage control,” since the case was in all the National Newspapers. They fire Joe Paterno immediately to stop all the News stories. That had a limited effect. It may also have been that the politics of Penn State Trustees had asked Coach Paterno on numerous times to step down and retire. This bad news provided an opportunity for them to finally be able to take action in getting 85-year-old Coach Paterno to step down. While he was coaching he was a powerful man that could tell the President and the Trustees what he wanted to do. Look at the numbers at Penn State. The football stadium seated 65,000 people all paying for tickets. The alumni contributors for the football program specifically and boosters as they are called who always raise funds for the Football program for full scholarships, uniforms, travel funds, coaching salaries, trainers, printing and marketing expenses. Penn State was an empire of Football income and contributions and at Penn state as well as any other campus the bottom line is money.

            This book, although fictional in nature, is based on events that actually happened at many Colleges across the United States over a period of twenty years 1980 to 2011. In no way is this book intended to cause malice toward any College or Institution or President or administrative or faculty individuals. The real intention of this book is to show what really goes on behind the scenes in Colleges and Universities in the United States and how “cover up” is the motto of the day.

            The first story is about a fictitious Catholic College in Staten Island, New York called St. Georges College. This College was on the property belonging to the Sisters of the Holy Cross. Originally, like so many other Catholic Colleges,  St. Georges began  as an all Women’s Colleges in the early 1900’s, and due to declining enrollment became a coed College in 1960. Many small Catholic Colleges that do not have a wealthy alumni base suffer from the same problems, and that is a low or poor alumni funding to help the college survive. Many people do not realize that all Colleges and Universities are tuition dependent as their main source of income. The smaller Colleges public and catholic do not have research departments that generate a lot of federal grants for scientific research, and a lot of funding for faculty, scientists, and facilities. 

Smaller Colleges also suffer from their inability to have good grant writers. They often have only one Development administrator who usually cannot write grants but only organize grants. It is the professors that have to write grants, or knowledgeable administrators that have the time and the motivation.

            One source of income for Catholic Colleges used to be endowment such as naming a classroom for an alumnus contribution. Large million dollar donations would grant an alumnus getting a building named after them. This worked well for a few decades, but after time, each and every classroom, building, gymnasium, pool, sports field, etc. had been named for some alumni that gave money. Even scholarships were named after the alumni contributor. Special graduation awards got to departments where previous alumni funded a Communications Department award, or a Biology Department award.

            Eventually the selling of names on classrooms and buildings much like the selling of pews in churches in the 1800’s and early 1900’s became a thing of the past. Catholic colleges did not have many means of raising funds especially after the Diocese of New York or any other supporting Diocese began cutting funds to Catholic Colleges, and even Catholic Schools in the 1980, 1990, and 2000’s.

            Since tuition is the main source of Catholic Colleges, unlike their Public College counterparts who also get funding from the State, Catholic College try to keep the tuition low so that they can serve 2nd generation immigrant students, low income, and minority students. Small Catholic College realize  they cannot compete with publically funded State Colleges, so they target their students from the lower pay scale of available students. Since their mission is to help the poor or help the minorities, they practically give away the tuition in grants, scholarships, and special financial awards. These scholarships are based on need and usually reduce the already low tuition to 50% less than full tuition. If the housing or enrollment is limited at a small Catholic college then they are in trouble. They will always be capped at the amount of students they can house and enroll. Commuter students comprise a large portion of many College and University enrollment. St. Johns University in Queens had 20,000 students in 2010, and only a few hundred live on campus in the few dormitories. This means that almost the entire St. John University student had to commute everyday.

            At St. George’s College of Staten Island only 20% of the students commuted. There were enough dorms on campus to house 2,000 students. The dorms were all old , rundown, and not very attractive. They were cheap as far as monthly rent goes.

St. George’s College did not make much money on dormitory fees, and in the summer the dorms were mostly empty.

            In the early years of St. George’s College the majority of the college faculty were Nuns from the Order of the Holy Cross. They worked for no pay except a small 10% living allowance, and they all lived in housing on the campus. The College in the early years 1930 through the 1950’s made a nice profit, because it’s faculty costs were extremely low. This changed over time because the Nuns were not getting new novices after WWII, and many were dying off. By 1980 70% of the original teaching staff of Nuns had passed away. Only a dozen teaching and administrative Nuns remained at St. George’s College as of 2000. Many other Catholic Colleges run by Nuns were suffering the same thing with a decline in Nuns on the teaching staff.

The Betrayal of the Nuns

            At an all Women’s College in White Plains, New York the “Sisters of Life.”  ran a College called Northern Westchester College. It suffered a decline in teaching Nuns , and enrollment during the 1960’s, when there was the anti-war, anti-establishment, and anti-church movement in the United States. Their enrollment dropped to an all time low of 300 students. They converted to coed by 1965 but the change came too late, and they were faced with closing. A large University from New York city wanted to locate a Medical School in Westchester on the property the Sisters of Life.  The Northern Westchester College was prime property in White Plains. They negotiated a deal to support Northern Westchester College, and at the same time build their Medical school on the same grounds. By 1970 the Northern Westchester College was closed, and the Medical school was booming with enrollment. The Sisters of Life were left out in the cold when the college finally closed even though the University promised to promote and keep Northern Westchester College open no matter what.

            Another group of Nuns called the  “Sisters of the Humble Poor,” has a viable Catholic Prep school in Westchester that began in 1901. Their school “St. Peters Prep of Westchester,” began to lose Nuns as they died out, and few replaced them. Originally the rich families sent their children to the famous St. Peters Prep of Westchester because it was well known as a good Catholic school that placed many graduates in large well known Universities such as Princeton, Yale, and New York University. After WWII, the teaching Nuns had dropped to only 1/3 of the faculty, and lay teachers had to be hired which increased the costs of the Prep school. The buildings of the late 1800’s were crumbling and the neighborhood around the Prep school slowly became a slum. By 1975 the Sisters of the Humble Poor were forced to sell the Prep school or default to New York City in taxes. They sold it to a Jewish school that promised on the sale contract to never sell the school buildings or property to private housing developers. The Jewish Yeshiva lasted ten years, and then went out of business. They sold the property and buildings to a private housing developer who wanted to put in condo units. The “Sisters of the Humble Poor,” sued the Jewish Yeshiva and after many years in court they won a one million dollar judgment. Unfortunately, the one million dollars came too late, because by the time of the settlement there were only four Sisters of the Humble Poor still alive. They donated the money to St. George’s College of Staten Island in exchange for a home for the four surviving Nuns to retire, and live out their lives. St. George’s College gratefully accepted the contribution and repaired it’s one hundred year old roof on its main administration building.  “Easy come, easy go” became the motto for the “Sisters of the Humble Poor.”

            The “Sisters of The Divine Heart,” of Westchester, New York were another group that was taken advantage of by another College. They had a K-12 Catholic School in New Rochelle, New York for over 100 years having been an orphanage originally. It served  Civil War children of fathers who were killed in the war. During the Civil War the “Sisters of the Divine Heart,” served in the War for both the North and the South in Medical hospitals. After the war they formed a small orphanage in New Rochelle sponsored by a millionaire that wanted to leave a legacy in his name so they named the Orphanage Sampson’s Orphanage. In 1910, the orphanage became an elementary school and in 1922 it became a high school also handling grades K-12.  By the late 1930’s, after the depression, they got a charter for an All-Woman’s College called Mount New Rochelle Catholic College. By the 1960’s, the College was in major financial trouble so it merged with Rochelle Shore College. Rochelle Shore College promised to maintain the Mount New Rochelle College, and its buildings and provide housing for the retired Nuns of the “Sisters of the Divine heart.” By 1972, Rochelle Shore College had become a University, and it closed down Mount New Rochelle College, and sold it for a handsome profit to private housing developers. Unfortunately, the “Sisters of the Divine Heart,” had trusted the Rochelle Shore College trustees, and there was no clause preventing them from selling the property at any time in the future. They were eventually left out in the cold.

            In Tarrytown high on the top of the Mountain was another All Women’s College Called High Mount College, that actually lasted until the 1990’s by providing a weekend college for women, evening programs, and an accelerated three year degree program for women. They refused to become a Coed College, and it cost them. Hartford College made them an offer to rent space on the college grounds, and they accepted. After five years, a problem developed with the Hartford College faculty who were union and the non-union High Mount Faculty. The Hartford College faculty were restricted to only the one building they leased from High Mount College. Problems developed and Hartford College threatened to pull out. As fate would have it High Mount College was going under financially. They could not keep enough all woman enrollment to survive. They made a deal with Hartford College to buy the property and buildings so long as it continued to support High Mount College. Three years later Hartford College got it’s revenge and pulled out of the property and sold everything to a private school and made a huge profit. High Mount College was closed forever.

  1. The Betrayal of the Nuns
    1. The Sisters of Life-College in White Plains-Pace took over
    2. The Sisters of the Holy Cross- Iona closed
    3. The Sisters of the Humble Poor- Sold Prep school to a Jewish Temple only to have them close years later and sell the property to a developer. The Sisters sued and won $1 million dollars.
    4. Heritage- Most Monasteries, Nun supported orphanages began in the 1800’s when there was a need for children without parents. Especially after the Civil War when many children lost their fathers
    5. History- Initially the Orphanages did very well and many later became Girls schools and then eventually even Colleges for Women. Traditionally the Church appointed male administrators to be in charge of these Catholic schools and colleges. By the 1960’s many catholic schools were in trouble of going out of business. The Vietnam War, Civil Rights Movement, the decrease interest in religion and the economy all contributed to the decreased enrollment in Catholic schools
    6. Mission-Many of the Sisters had a mission to help the poor when in fact they themselves lived in poverty. It is difficult to help the poor when the Catholic Church stopped supporting these many Nun supported Catholic schools. Once the Nuns died out there was no one that would work for free to replace them. They kept costs down because they worked for virtually nothing for the Church.

The Catholic Church had it’s own financial problems and could not help the many Nun founded Catholic schools.

Orphanages became a thing of the past. The State of New York moved in the direction of group homes for wards of the state or orphans. Orphanages were in buildings that were built in the 1800’s and were crumbling and rotting away.  They did not have modern electricity and modern plumbing which all had to be replaced over the years. Not having sufficient money to do this maintenance the buildings eventually became unsafe to use and were often condemned by building inspectors.

  1. The dying breedWhere it was fashionable for Italian and Irish families to have a son become a priest and a daughter become a Nun was an honor.Times changed and the Catholic requirement of celibacy for Priest turned many a man away.For the NUNS they were replaced by trained Nurses in hospitals, Teaching changes and technology came into place outdating many NUNs in education. Italian and Irish families changed over the past 100 years to become mixed with other religions and other nationalities. The old world Italian and Irish traditions began to change and were forgotten. So the need for young girls to become a Nun faded. Women wanted equality and got it and they wanted jobs like the men and got that too. Women left behind the role of caregiver, homemaker, nurse and teacher and ventured into the business world. Women became more educated and earned more money and forgot about Nuns tending the poor.
  2. Reduction of Sisters of Life over 100 years of service
    1. The City of New York took over the services for the poor in many ways
    1. Legal challenges to protecting the homeless became the job of the city to find housing.
    1. The Catholic Nuns lost the significance they once had in society in treating the poor, the homeless, and pregnant young mothers. The role switched to the City schools to reach out to help pregnant young mothers with alternative schools. The State of New York provided welfare support to poor families. Orphanages became old buildings just like mental institutions that fell out of favor with society.
  3. Retirement of the Sisters of Life
    1. At some point in time even Nuns become to old to keep working so they must retire. There are very few retirement homes or facilities for Nuns that allow them to retire in some comfort with little or no pension money.
  4. Changing from a male dominant leadership to a female dominant leadership
    1. In the 1880’s the Catholic Church was male dominated and they did not tolerate female interference as in the case of Sister Eliz. Seton who was turned away by the Bishop when she wanted to form a girl’s school.
    1. This trend continued up until the 1960 when Nuns had to reach out side to the secular community to help them with teachers and administrators.
    1. Secular civilians were brought in to replace the Mother Superior to run Girls schools and Girls Colleges.
    1. By the 1960’s all girls’ schools were dying out so they converted to COED and allowed boys to attend. At first the change was good but it did not last long with free public schools providing superior educations with well-trained teachers for the first time in a century.
    1. Those Girl’s schools that did not want to change like Marymount in White Plains eventually lost their enrollment and had to sell out to Fordham University who in turn closed the school and sold it for a nice profit.
  5. The aging of the infrastructure and the inability to prevent deterioration and planned maintenance.
    1. It cost a lot of money for planned maintenance and Nuns traditionally id not have enough money left over to upgrade their buildings.
    1. Natural disasters are bound to happen or simply erosion, storm damage, rusting facilities, aging decay, poor construction, and out of date structures all eventually fall down or become condemned or burn down from poor electrical wiring.
  6. The wolves outside the door of the Sisters
    1. 1980’s Sisters of Life ran St. Mary’s College (a 2 year institution) in Yonkers.  I was teaching there as an adjunct at the time.   They were underwater and IONA stepped in to help save the institution.  Within 2-3 years, IONA closed the school, sold the property and made the money.
    1.  1980’s the Sisters of Loving Care ran College of Sacred Heart in White Plains.  In 1976.   It was taken over by PACE who promised to continue to run the school with the nuns.   PACE put their Law school there, and in a few years closed the college that the nuns previously owned.  The nuns have been in litigation with PACE for years – I am not sure how or if this was ever resolved.  Probably – information available on the web somewhere.
  7. In early 2000’s Fordham took over Marymount in Tarrytown -which was underwater.  They promised to continue the mission of the sisters and improve the college.   Four years ago, Fordham closed them down, sold the property for a good sum.  Marymount sisters were outraged
  1. Administration-Catholic Colleges vs. standard Private colleges, differences similarities
    1. In the Franciscan and Vincentian orders the President works for nothing and that saves a lot of money
    2. In other Catholic orders the Mothers Superior have died out and no one was qualified to take their place. The schools had to meet new NY State Education requirements in both their teachers as well as administrators. Many schools and colleges lacked leadership within and had to seek Educational Administrators outside the Catholic community.
    3. In One Women’s College a new President was being sought. The salary was not high and there were few applicants that wanted to be President of a financially troubled institution. A new male non-religious President was hired and he just happened to be Gay. Sadly, he used his sexual preference to hire boyfriends of his in major College Administrative positions even if they had no previous experience
    4. Gay Male VP of Finance
    5. Gay Male Director of Admissions
    6. Gay Female Director of Athletics
    7. Trustees who had no clue
  2. Looking for a scape goat
    1. The VP of Finance who stole from the Grant and how he met his demise.
      1. In 1999 the College of St. Paul of Staten Island received a Title V Federal Grant from the US Department of Education for Hispanic Serving Institutions. The College needed 25% Hispanic student population to qualify for the grant which was easy since 35% of it’s population was Hispanic coming from Staten Island.
      1. Before a Coordinator for the Title V grant could be hired the College began the grant with no one in place to direct the grant or carry out its goals. The writer of the grant had quit the college and there was no one who understood what the grant required. The VP of Finance at the time saw an opportunity to buy some financial software without informing the incoming President. The VP of Finance also allowed one of the Deans to draw down money from the grant for unrelated stationary supplies for her office and Reading Center. Sixty thousand was spent during the first year of the grant before a coordinator was hired in the spring of the next year.
      1. Two years after the VP of Finance was removed the opportunity presented itself to look into the purchasing records to see where the missing $60,000 was spent on without proper authorization from the President of VP of Academic Affairs who was theoretically in charge of the Title V grant.
  3. The Dean who stood up against the New President’s policies and how she was forced into retirement.
    1. As always the case when a new President comes in he or she sweeps house with all the previous VPs and Deans to put in place people that answer to the new President not to the traditions of old.
    1. One such Dean was quite outspoken and she did not agree in the direction the new President was taking the college. She protested and was eventually asked to retire or resign. She retired and no one replaced her.
  4. The changing of the guard with the VP of Academic affairs, the professor replacement, the Director of Nursing replacement.
    1. When you have a constant change of the VP of Academic affairs, the School Controller, and the VP of Financial affairs then no college or school can operate properly. New Policies and procedures cannot be mandated and expect to be successful. If the finances are so poorly managed that even the President does not know how much money there is in the bank, then there can be no financial plan or mission that will work.
    1. Kicking out the old guard. Sometimes the faculty and department chairperson age beyond the normal retirement age. They become dinosaurs that cannot change their old habits and become fearful of technology and new methods of teaching a whole new student body from the 1980’s and 1990’s and 21st century. The president saw these as a move forward and forced out the old chairman into retirement or cut their positions to part-time. Along with these old-timers when many a dedicated Nun who had no place to go except teach at the college.
  1. The firing of the Director of Personnel (gay man who had no background in finance) and who was hired because he had a relationship with the President. Fell out of favor with the president. Unable to properly manage the renovation of an old building. Blamed for taking retirement funds and using it to fund an elevator in the renovated building due to a summer shortage of funds
  2. Pushing out old Nuns in teaching positions
  3. Phasing out old faculty because they were old
  4. Back stabbing
  5. Inter-College relationships
    1. College of St. George and the College of Holy Essence. The College of St. George of Staten Island was founded around the time of the Civil War and many of its buildings were built before the 1900’s. It began as an Orphanage and then became a Girls Prep School and then Woman’s College by the 1900’s. Nursing and Education were the biggest programs at the College. Many of its graduates became teachers and Nurses who never made a lot of money in their lifetime.
    2. The College of Holy Essence was supported not by a Sister hood but the Franciscan Brothers of Staten Island who were well endowed by private donations. In the 1960’s both colleges were threatened with possible closure when they decided to develop a mutual relationship where they would exchange students and faculty to save on expenses. They also became fully coed and attracted a lot of Staten Island students from Italian and Latino families.
    3. Benefits of cross-enrollment  
      1. The College of Holy Essence had a great Sports program that it gave out many scholarships, whereas the College of St. Mary’s of Staten Island did not have any athletic fields or outstanding sports teams. Both schools were able to share sports facilities to cut expenses.
      1. The College of Holy Essence had a very high academic standard and offered Engineering, Math, Chemistry, Computer Programming, and other difficult academic programs. The College of St. Mary’s of Staten Island was service orientated so from it’s long standing tradition Nursing was it’s number one program and Communications was the second largest program thanks to cross-enrollment from the College of Holy Essence.
  6. Shortcomings of cross-enrollment
    1. Lots of lateness due to the need to catch a shuttle bus
    1. Difference in each college’s Missions
    1. Financial difference between the College of Holy Essence being the richer school and the Poorer College of St. Mary of Staten Island.
    1. The athletes on full scholarships at the College of Holy Essence were not smart enough for Engineering and Computer programming so they all enrolled at the College of St. Mary’s Communications Program in Radio and Television that was a much easier and friendlier program.
    1. The College of Holy Essence always wanted the controlling power when it came to cross-campus policies and enrollment.
    1. The College of Holy Essence was miles ahead of St. Mary’s College of Staten Island in technology since they offered programming and put a high premium on advanced technology, wireless classrooms, Internet access, and smart classrooms and lecture halls.
  7. The deadly President’s letter from St. George to the College of Holy Essence and how the contract between Catholic schools fell apart.
    1. Effects on the Department of Communications. The department of Communications went from a student enrollment of 2000 students to less than 300 without the students from the College of Holy Essence. The Dean of Communications left for the College of Holy Essence when they offered him a major salary increase and a brand new facility and program that he could set up from scratch. Their only problem was a lack of space on campus to house the new Communications department. The assistant to the Director/Dean was promoted to the position not as Director but as Manager that commanded a lower salary. The Department Chairperson retired from Communications and the staff shrunk from over 20 adjuncts and 5 full time professors to less than ten part-time faculty.
    1. Fine Arts, Education, Psychology, Nursing, Math, Chemistry, shared departments, all experience a reduction in class enrollment which translated to many adjunct and full-time faculty being fired.
    1. Effects on enrollment. Initially the enrollment went down but the College of St. Mary of Staten Island loosened up on its enrollment policies and also hired placement counselors in Connecticut to recruit students.
    1. St. Mary of Staten Island had a tradition of not offering Sport Scholarships and this policy prevented the Division III teams from excelling. Instead of sport scholarships, financial grants were given to athletes especially from Connecticut to help improve the Baseball team, basketball team, and Volleyball team.
  8. D. The big Title III USDE grant
    1. Minority serving institutions
    2. Meeting the Federal agenda
    3. Integrating technologies into the classrooms
      1. Installing smart classrooms
        1. The requirements for the smart classrooms were out of date with the installation of Televisions wall mounted with VCRs. By the 21st century computer projectors and electronic white boards were the teaching medium of choice
        1. Previous movie screen and TV mounts were unsafe and not properly installed
        1. Improved TV mounts with “H” brackets that spread out the weight distribution on the wall. Bolted through the brick and plaster walls to the next classroom that plywood base to prevent the bolts from pulling out over time.
        1. Wireless technology in every classroom.
        1. Loaner laptops to access wireless technology
        1. Theft and classroom security
        1. Wireless projects and why they were easy to install but worked too slowly to be effective
        1. Tutoring faculty how to use technology in the classroom
        1. The shortcomings of the IT department.
          1. Part-time college students
          1. No defined mission
          1. No funding
          1. Developed out of Collegis five million dollar contract that ripped the college off blind.  Computers were cheap and did not last three years. Parts were stolen from one computer to repair another computer, resulting in a computer graveyard.
          1. Underpaid personnel
          1. Poor HELP station
          1. Good personnel exit to find higher paying jobs.
      1. Installing smart lecture halls
      1. Installing smart computer labs
      1. Installing new renovated facilities
  1. Integrating technologies into the curriculum and lectures
  2. Writing a curriculum
  3. Finding a facility for a Teacher Excellence Center
  4. Finding furniture
  5. Getting rid of file cabinets
  6. Establishing a relationship with IT
  7. Quid pro quo (one hand wipes another hand)
  8. Personalities to work around
  9. IT Director secrets
  10. IT Director’s inability to install new Banner finance software and his making promises to the President he could not keep.
  1. II. Catholic Stories
  1. The Faculty Stories
  2. Outsourcing
  3. Collegis
  4. Banner
  5. Food Services
  6. Cleaning Services
  1. IV Expose’
  1. Teachers caught having a sexual relationship with their students
  2. Homosexual relations
  3. Sex with female college students by faculty
  4. Scandals in hiring procedures
  5. The hiring of the Athletic Director
  6. The hiring of the Dean of Students
  7. The hiring of the VP of Finance
  8. The replacement of the Director of Human Resources
  9. The hiring of the VPs of Academic Affairs
  10. How the VP of Finance tricked the school into a five million dollar contract with Collegis. She was a previous employee of Collegis and no one knew that until she quit her position at the College.
  11. Pushing out the Education Department Chair who was a Nun
  12. Department chairpersons making overload money
  13. How they controlled the summer school system
  14. How they were over paid even when they were freed from teaching to supervise teachers
  15. The inability to change from the old system to a new system
  16. The old way of doing things, cheapest thing goes
  17. A constant shortage of money
  18. An inability to meet the demands of technology
  19. The inability of the Faculty Council to keep the President in line.
  20. The spies on the Faculty Council.
  21. The elevators
  22. How the large elevator really broke down and why.
  23. The two 100-year-old elevators that constantly broke down.
  24. The lack of safety backup for elevators
  25. The condemning of the stair cases
  26. The surprise inspection that condemned the stair case to the extension as being dangerous
  27. The 6-week disaster as a result of teachers being unable to get to their offices.
  28. The falling down outside porch
  29. The Nuns outside porch that rotted and had to be taken down
  30. The constant repair problems with the remainder of the porch
  31. The Administration building built on rock
  32. The basement erosion
  33. The actual bedrock visible in the basement of the building.
  1. The Castle/ Student Services
  2. The Nun in the tower
  3. How she came to be there
  4. The four story castle keep
  5. Problems with the castle
  6. The ineffective security guard system
  7. Underpaid security guards
  8. A director with no real power
  9. No video cameras installed
  10. No locked classrooms in the administration building
  11. The stealing of smart classroom equipment by a security guard
  12. The Friday afternoon thefts of projectors installed in 18 ft. ceilings
  13. The motis operande
  14. Catching the thief
  15. Losing $10,000 worth of equipment
  16. The administration doing nothing
  17. The break-in to the Communications TV studio and theft.
  18. The opportunity to use grant funds for wireless video cameras in the newly renovated building
  19. The refusal
  20. The eventual break-in and theft of thousands of dollars of TV cameras and recorders.
  21. The eventual installation of the wireless video cameras after the theft
  22. Reported rapes of female students on campus in the dorms.
  23. The lack of safety at night with a poorly lit campus
  24. Outside students from other colleges having access to the dorms
  25. Local gang students roaming the campus at night
  26. The forgotten Point Richard on the Hudson
  27. The piece of valuable land cut off by the Metro-North rail road
  28. The abandonment of the property
  29. The abandoned Metro North Railroad station
  30. The original train stop at the College of St. George
  31. A change in transportation brings about abandonment of the train station and its destruction
  32. The Home for Children of the State next door.
  33. Right next to the St. George College property was a State Home for wayward children who often came around the fence to steal things on campus
  34. The Westchester sewer plant next door.
  35. The smell
  36. The inability to control sewage overflow at the Sewer plant
  37. The Elementary school run by the Nuns and it’s closing
  38. Declining enrollment
  39. Closing of the prep academy
  40. Selling of the property to raise money
  41. The high-rise building that replaced the property that was once the Sr. George Prep School.
  42. The effect of a high rise building overlooking the campus
  43. The loss of vital land that could have been used for campus expansion.
  44. The selling of the first St. Mary Academy to a Jewish organization that folded and tried to sell the property for condos. The lawsuit and the one million the Nuns got which went to repair the administration’s building roof.
  45. Declining enrollment
  46. The decision to sell and the contract prohibiting being sold for other than educational purposes
  47. The lawsuit and the settlement
  48. Easy come and easy go, as one million dollar settlement has to be used to repair a seriously leaking administration-building roof.
  49. The integration of Technology Over the five-year period of the Title III grants.
  50. Hiring a director
  51. Selecting staff
  52. Completing a budget
  53. $60,000 missing before the Director was hired
  54. Tutoring 84 faculty over 5 years.
  55. The Teacher Excellence Center Ambassadors
  56. The Laptop computer loaner program
  57. Balancing the grant budget annually
  58. Grant rules and regulations
  59. The liaison with the Communication Department and its Associate Dean
  60. The relationship with the IT department
  61. The relationship with The College of Holy Essence and its IT staff
  62. The Presidents hiring of the Director of Technology at the College of Holy Essence to work part-time at St George’s College
  63. The College of Holy Essence undermining the St. George College’s efforts in establishing technology.
  64. 22. The end of the grant
  65. The politics regarding promised made in the grant and promise not kept by the President
  66. The desire not to fund the Teacher Excellence Center and staff
  67. Playing it cheap
  68. Finishing the budget on time and on balance except for the $60,000 that was stolen by a previous VP of Finance but never replaced by the President.

Chapter One-from the Novel-“The Junior High.”

by Dr. Pelham Mead, (c) 2012, Xlibris publishers

Chapter 1- In the beginning

The name Cucamonga came from the name of a local Native American Tribe that used to live in the High Mountain area in New York. When the High Mountain school district began to explode in student population in the 1960’s it was decided that an additional Junior High school needed to be built. At the time there was only two junior high schools North JHS and South JHS. The students at South JHS were overcrowded in their school and they were on double sessions for a few years until the Board of Education of High Mountain school district put before the community a bond approval to build a third Junior high school to deal with the overcrowded conditions of the existing schools. The name of the new junior high was put up to the South JHS students to determine in a school-wide vote since ½ of these students would be sent to the new Junior high when it was finished in 1960. The choices were: Central High Mountain JHS, Washington JHS, and Cucamonga JHS. The students in South JHS did not want to go to the new Junior high school so as spoilers they choose the worse name they could and that was Cucamonga JHS.

The current Assistant Principal of South JHS was to be transferred to the new Cucamonga JHS when it was finished. He was given the choice of what teachers he wanted to bring with him, so he chose his best friends whom were all department chairman. They were all older men in the late 50’s and early 60’s. This seemed like a good base with which to start a new junior with experienced teachers. Actually no teachers transferred, only administrators. All of the rest of the teachers were hired new. In 1967 alone 300 teachers were hired in the High Mountain school district to meet the every expanding student population expansion. Cucamonga JHS started with 600 students and by 1975 had doubled to 1600 students in the one building built for only 1,000 students.

When the fall of 1960 came about the construction was not completed however the district moved the students into the unfinished building anyway. Construction delays caused the problem. While teachers were teaching in their classrooms, workers were drilling and nailing walls together in the next classroom. The noise problem was difficult to teach in without distraction. The auditorium was half finished with the seats not completely installed. Technically it was illegal to occupy a building that had not been finished but the district had no Plan B in case the building was not completely finished. Somehow the school district managed to avoid being fined by the local building code inspectors.

No sooner had Cucamonga JHS been built than it became overcrowded, and an extension was planned for and built in 1967. A small gym later was started in 1968 and finished by 1970 to accommodate the increase in student enrollment. A lot of problems developed with the heating and air circulation systems in the new extension requiring more construction and repairs to be made. Some classrooms lost all heat and were as cold as the outside weather in the fall and winter of 1967. Teachers had to move classes to the cafeteria or auditorium or library when the classrooms had no heat. A fire was started in a closet in the large gymnasium when a worker with a blowtorch accidently ignited the insulation in the ceiling while he was wielding metal braces under the roof. Fortunately the damage was limited to the storage closet and the fire department was able to get to the fire fast enough to prevent serious damage. The real damage was water damage to the gymnasium flooring.  The boy’s locker room had showers but no hot water until that problem was fixed. In the 1960’s is normal to give out soap and towels to students to shower after class. It was mandatory at that time. When the 1970’s came in with the concern for individual liberties and student’s rights and many lawsuits to determine student’s rights the required showers were abandoned and a shortage in funds dropped the expensive towel and soap program in Physical Education. Eventually only the sports teams would use the shower rooms and Physical Education students went to class smelling and sweating.

The teaching staff grew from 70 teachers initially to over 120 teachers by 1975. Many part-time teachers also joined the teaching ranks and teachers who traveled from one school to another became another portion of the teaching staff. Para-professionals came into use known as Teacher Aides who needed only two years of College to be eligible for the job. The district used to have team teaching but para-professionals provided a cheaper approach than two full paid teachers to one class. For a few years there was a special education teacher and a mainstream teacher teaching a mixed ability group of students including special education students.

Community voting on public bond issues was always difficult because the majority of the High Mountain school district was represented by Jewish private schools called “Yeshivas.” The private Yeshiva population grew from 7,000 students in the 1960’s to 15,000 in the 1990’s. The Jewish community had to be courted by the Superintendent of High Mountain school district in order to secure their support of the public school budgets. Many trade offs had to be offered the private school community such as universal busing, used textbooks and used school furniture and special professional services. The Jewish community voted as a block against the expansion of the public school bond issues by busing Jewish voters to the voting poles. No public referendum could be passed without getting the Jewish community vote. The Jewish community were paying both for Yeshivas for their children to attend and for public school tax. Under New York State law the High Mountain school district Superintendent was legally responsible for all public and private schools within the borders of the High Mountain School District. Therefore, Yeshivas had to meet NY State Education requirements or they would not be certified. The High Mountain school district was one of only two major Jewish districts in New York State that had a significant number of students attending Yeshivas instead of Public schools. This meant that the formula for repayment to the High Mountain School from New York State did not include the private Yeshiva students. The public school system of High Mountain did not get any revenue from New York State to offset the cost of carrying thousands of Yeshiva students who were not in public school. This also included Catholic Schools that were a much smaller number of students. This lack of funds from New York State would eventually cause the High Mountain School district to develop a major shortage of funds to pay for the school budget every year. The shortage of funds developed into threatened teacher strikes, no teacher contracts for three years sometimes, cutting back in hiring new teachers, cutting back in sports programs such as elementary soccer, softball and basketball programs were cut. Concern Parents had to form their own sports associations to provide sports for elementary school children. This community sports program eventually grew to include Junior and Senior Highs students that could not qualify for the school teams.

The 1960 were a turbulent time in American with the Civil Rights movement taking hold, Black Power, radicalism in student organizations and the anti-Vietnam war movement. Coupled with the “drug generation,” and the Anti-war movement of hippies and beatniks the 1960’s and 1970’s were troubled times in American. These problems translated down to the local level with students mimicking what they saw on TV and what was happening in the media. Student protests were the thing of the day. Fake bombing calls INS were also the fade of the generation. Bomb fake calls came on a daily if not weekly basis and the entire school had to be evacuated every time. No one was every caught. This fad went on for years until a Principal from another school district had enough of the fake bomb threats and decided not to evacuate the building. After that many other school districts follow suit and made changes in their fire alarm systems with a yellow detection spray, video cameras, and a new approach to bomb threats. Twenty years later bomb threats would be a thing of the past, just as the Vietnam War became a thing of the past.

Some teachers were considered militant when it came to anti-Vietnam policies and that was unfortunate because they affect the minds of the children they taught. Militant teachers painted their rooms with psychedelic colors and logos to mirror the slogans of the times. Some of the militant teachers had long hair and dressed in jeans and worn t-shirts with logos like “No WAR,” or “Peace.” Militant song groups appeared on the music scene and could be heard in the militant teacher classrooms. The administrators were useless in being able to stop the militant teacher activities. The anti-War issue divided the faculty but no one would support an administrator trying to make a stand for or against the War or Militant teachers.

The term “politically incorrect, “ came into play. Black student could not longer be called Negro students. Black or Black Americans or African Americans became the buzzwords. The word “nigger” was the ultimate insult for black students when it was used by a white student or white teacher, however it seem OK for one black student to call another black student a “nigger.” It became known as the “N” word for white teachers or white students. There was a lot of racism during the 1960’s and 1970’s and many teachers tried to straddle the line but did not succeed. Expressions such as “your people,” smirked of racism. Black parents and black students were very race conscious during these turbulent years. All of these issues translated to problems at Cucamonga JHS as in all schools in the United States. 

Teachers at Cucamonga JHS had to be especially careful in their language and how they treated black students in regard to how they treated other students. The sensitivity of race issues was on the surface and would not go away. Many teachers got into trouble when they used language that was misinterpreted by black students. Black students would often run to administrators and tell false tales to get a teacher they did not like in trouble because of the sensitivity of the racism issues during the 1970’s and 1980’s. Teaching during these turbulent times was no picnic. The militant teachers twenty years later cut their hair short and became part of the mainstream society as if they were never militant in their lifetime. It was amazing how some militant teachers became moles for the administrators after fighting the administration for so many years. It shows that in time you either conform to the rules and policies or get out. If a teacher wanted to make it to retirement age they all had to change over time and become more liberal or conservative in their philosophical approach to teaching and issues of society.

The College

The College of St. George of Staten Island

Outline for Proposed Movie Script

By Dr. Pelham Mead 2021.

  1. Introduction

Each and every College and University in the United States whether a Catholic College or Private or Public College always has something to hide. It seems to be standard procedure to sweep problems under the rug rather than deal with the problems in an honest and outright manner. Sadly, faculty and students suffer in the end from the indiscretions of the Presidents, and administrators. When monies are stolen from accounts and the person is caught, most Colleges deal with it internally so as not to let the story get into the Newspapers and produce a bad image of the College. Colleges and Universities are often afraid of the impact of a bad story and how it will affect their alumni contributions. Their justification is when a major bad story breaks that puts the College of University in a bad light; there is a domino effect as to public opinion and alumni opinion. Colleges or Universities are afraid that alumni will stop making contributions to the school because of bad story of embezzlement, violence on campus, child sexual abuse, administrative misdeeds, and other negative stories.

            Take for instance the case of Joe Paterno the Football coach at Penn State University shows that he reported a case of suspected sex abuse of young boys by an assistant coach to his superiors and they in turn swept the problem under the carpet until all hell broke loose in the fall of 2010 and the story came to the surface when one or more victims told their story to the Police and the Newspapers. The story went viral and Penn State was put in a very poor light nationally and internationally.  The first effect of this poor image would be alumni concern and a sudden decrease of alumni contributions. Some alumni are such large contributors that they often have great leverage with the University Trustees. In the Penn State situation the Trustees needed to exercise  “
damage control,” since the case was in all the National Newspapers. They fire Joe Paterno immediately to stop all the News stories. That had a limited effect. It may also have been that the politics of Penn State Trustees had asked Coach Paterno on numerous times to step down and retire. This bad news provided an opportunity for them to finally be able to take action in getting 85-year-old Coach Paterno to step down. While he was coaching he was a powerful man that could tell the President and the Trustees what he wanted to do. Look at the numbers at Penn State. The football stadium seated 65,000 people all paying for tickets. The alumni contributors for the football program specifically and boosters as they are called who always raise funds for the Football program for full scholarships, uniforms, travel funds, coaching salaries, trainers, printing and marketing expenses. Penn State was an empire of Football income and contributions and at Penn state as well as any other campus the bottom line is money.

            This book, although fictional in nature, is based on events that actually happened at many Colleges across the United States over a period of twenty years 1980 to 2011. In no way is this book intended to cause malice toward any College or Institution or President or administrative or faculty individuals. The real intention of this book is to show what really goes on behind the scenes in Colleges and Universities in the United States and how “cover up” is the motto of the day.

            The first story is about a fictitious Catholic College in Staten Island, New York called St. Georges College. This College was on the property belonging to the Sisters of the Holy Cross. Originally, like so many other Catholic Colleges,  St. Georges began  as an all Women’s Colleges in the early 1900’s, and due to declining enrollment became a coed College in 1960. Many small Catholic Colleges that do not have a wealthy alumni base suffer from the same problems, and that is a low or poor alumni funding to help the college survive. Many people do not realize that all Colleges and Universities are tuition dependent as their main source of income. The smaller Colleges public and catholic do not have research departments that generate a lot of federal grants for scientific research, and a lot of funding for faculty, scientists, and facilities. 

Smaller Colleges also suffer from their inability to have good grant writers. They often have only one Development administrator who usually cannot write grants but only organize grants. It is the professors that have to write grants, or knowledgeable administrators that have the time and the motivation.

            One source of income for Catholic Colleges used to be endowment such as naming a classroom for an alumnus contribution. Large million dollar donations would grant an alumnus getting a building named after them. This worked well for a few decades, but after time, each and every classroom, building, gymnasium, pool, sports field, etc. had been named for some alumni that gave money. Even scholarships were named after the alumni contributor. Special graduation awards got to departments where previous alumni funded a Communications Department award, or a Biology Department award.

            Eventually the selling of names on classrooms and buildings much like the selling of pews in churches in the 1800’s and early 1900’s became a thing of the past. Catholic colleges did not have many means of raising funds especially after the Diocese of New York or any other supporting Diocese began cutting funds to Catholic Colleges, and even Catholic Schools in the 1980, 1990, and 2000’s.

            Since tuition is the main source of Catholic Colleges, unlike their Public College counterparts who also get funding from the State, Catholic College try to keep the tuition low so that they can serve 2nd generation immigrant students, low income, and minority students. Small Catholic College realize  they cannot compete with publically funded State Colleges, so they target their students from the lower pay scale of available students. Since their mission is to help the poor or help the minorities, they practically give away the tuition in grants, scholarships, and special financial awards. These scholarships are based on need and usually reduce the already low tuition to 50% less than full tuition. If the housing or enrollment is limited at a small Catholic college then they are in trouble. They will always be capped at the amount of students they can house and enroll. Commuter students comprise a large portion of many College and University enrollment. St. Johns University in Queens had 20,000 students in 2010, and only a few hundred live on campus in the few dormitories. This means that almost the entire St. John University student had to commute everyday.

            At St. George’s College of Staten Island only 20% of the students commuted. There were enough dorms on campus to house 2,000 students. The dorms were all old , rundown, and not very attractive. They were cheap as far as monthly rent goes.

St. George’s College did not make much money on dormitory fees, and in the summer the dorms were mostly empty.

            In the early years of St. George’s College the majority of the college faculty were Nuns from the Order of the Holy Cross. They worked for no pay except a small 10% living allowance, and they all lived in housing on the campus. The College in the early years 1930 through the 1950’s made a nice profit, because it’s faculty costs were extremely low. This changed over time because the Nuns were not getting new novices after WWII, and many were dying off. By 1980 70% of the original teaching staff of Nuns had passed away. Only a dozen teaching and administrative Nuns remained at St. George’s College as of 2000. Many other Catholic Colleges run by Nuns were suffering the same thing with a decline in Nuns on the teaching staff.

The Betrayal of the Nuns

            At an all Women’s College in White Plains, New York the “Sisters of Life.”  ran a College called Northern Westchester College. It suffered a decline in teaching Nuns , and enrollment during the 1960’s, when there was the anti-war, anti-establishment, and anti-church movement in the United States. Their enrollment dropped to an all time low of 300 students. They converted to coed by 1965 but the change came too late, and they were faced with closing. A large University from New York city wanted to locate a Medical School in Westchester on the property the Sisters of Life.  The Northern Westchester College was prime property in White Plains. They negotiated a deal to support Northern Westchester College, and at the same time build their Medical school on the same grounds. By 1970 the Northern Westchester College was closed, and the Medical school was booming with enrollment. The Sisters of Life were left out in the cold when the college finally closed even though the University promised to promote and keep Northern Westchester College open no matter what.

            Another group of Nuns called the  “Sisters of the Humble Poor,” has a viable Catholic Prep school in Westchester that began in 1901. Their school “St. Peters Prep of Westchester,” began to lose Nuns as they died out, and few replaced them. Originally the rich families sent their children to the famous St. Peters Prep of Westchester because it was well known as a good Catholic school that placed many graduates in large well known Universities such as Princeton, Yale, and New York University. After WWII, the teaching Nuns had dropped to only 1/3 of the faculty, and lay teachers had to be hired which increased the costs of the Prep school. The buildings of the late 1800’s were crumbling and the neighborhood around the Prep school slowly became a slum. By 1975 the Sisters of the Humble Poor were forced to sell the Prep school or default to New York City in taxes. They sold it to a Jewish school that promised on the sale contract to never sell the school buildings or property to private housing developers. The Jewish Yeshiva lasted ten years, and then went out of business. They sold the property and buildings to a private housing developer who wanted to put in condo units. The “Sisters of the Humble Poor,” sued the Jewish Yeshiva and after many years in court they won a one million dollar judgment. Unfortunately, the one million dollars came too late, because by the time of the settlement there were only four Sisters of the Humble Poor still alive. They donated the money to St. George’s College of Staten Island in exchange for a home for the four surviving Nuns to retire, and live out their lives. St. George’s College gratefully accepted the contribution and repaired it’s one hundred year old roof on its main administration building.  “Easy come, easy go” became the motto for the “Sisters of the Humble Poor.”

            The “Sisters of The Divine Heart,” of Westchester, New York were another group that was taken advantage of by another College. They had a K-12 Catholic School in New Rochelle, New York for over 100 years having been an orphanage originally. It served  Civil War children of fathers who were killed in the war. During the Civil War the “Sisters of the Divine Heart,” served in the War for both the North and the South in Medical hospitals. After the war they formed a small orphanage in New Rochelle sponsored by a millionaire that wanted to leave a legacy in his name so they named the Orphanage Sampson’s Orphanage. In 1910, the orphanage became an elementary school and in 1922 it became a high school also handling grades K-12.  By the late 1930’s, after the depression, they got a charter for an All-Woman’s College called Mount New Rochelle Catholic College. By the 1960’s, the College was in major financial trouble so it merged with Rochelle Shore College. Rochelle Shore College promised to maintain the Mount New Rochelle College, and its buildings and provide housing for the retired Nuns of the “Sisters of the Divine heart.” By 1972, Rochelle Shore College had become a University, and it closed down Mount New Rochelle College, and sold it for a handsome profit to private housing developers. Unfortunately, the “Sisters of the Divine Heart,” had trusted the Rochelle Shore College trustees, and there was no clause preventing them from selling the property at any time in the future. They were eventually left out in the cold.

            In Tarrytown high on the top of the Mountain was another All Women’s College Called High Mount College, that actually lasted until the 1990’s by providing a weekend college for women, evening programs, and an accelerated three year degree program for women. They refused to become a Coed College, and it cost them. Hartford College made them an offer to rent space on the college grounds, and they accepted. After five years, a problem developed with the Hartford College faculty who were union and the non-union High Mount Faculty. The Hartford College faculty were restricted to only the one building they leased from High Mount College. Problems developed and Hartford College threatened to pull out. As fate would have it High Mount College was going under financially. They could not keep enough all woman enrollment to survive. They made a deal with Hartford College to buy the property and buildings so long as it continued to support High Mount College. Three years later Hartford College got it’s revenge and pulled out of the property and sold everything to a private school and made a huge profit. High Mount College was closed forever.

  1. The Betrayal of the Nuns
    1. The Sisters of Life-College in White Plains-Pace took over
    2. The Sisters of the Holy Cross- Iona closed
    3. The Sisters of the Humble Poor- Sold Prep school to a Jewish Temple only to have them close years later and sell the property to a developer. The Sisters sued and won $1 million dollars.
    4. Heritage- Most Monasteries, Nun supported orphanages began in the 1800’s when there was a need for children without parents. Especially after the Civil War when many children lost their fathers
    5. History- Initially the Orphanages did very well and many later became Girls schools and then eventually even Colleges for Women. Traditionally the Church appointed male administrators to be in charge of these Catholic schools and colleges. By the 1960’s many catholic schools were in trouble of going out of business. The Vietnam War, Civil Rights Movement, the decrease interest in religion and the economy all contributed to the decreased enrollment in Catholic schools
    6. Mission-Many of the Sisters had a mission to help the poor when in fact they themselves lived in poverty. It is difficult to help the poor when the Catholic Church stopped supporting these many Nun supported Catholic schools. Once the Nuns died out there was no one that would work for free to replace them. They kept costs down because they worked for virtually nothing for the Church.

The Catholic Church had it’s own financial problems and could not help the many Nun founded Catholic schools.

Orphanages became a thing of the past. The State of New York moved in the direction of group homes for wards of the state or orphans. Orphanages were in buildings that were built in the 1800’s and were crumbling and rotting away.  They did not have modern electricity and modern plumbing which all had to be replaced over the years. Not having sufficient money to do this maintenance the buildings eventually became unsafe to use and were often condemned by building inspectors.

  1. The dying breedWhere it was fashionable for Italian and Irish families to have a son become a priest and a daughter become a Nun was an honor.Times changed and the Catholic requirement of celibacy for Priest turned many a man away.For the NUNS they were replaced by trained Nurses in hospitals, Teaching changes and technology came into place outdating many NUNs in education. Italian and Irish families changed over the past 100 years to become mixed with other religions and other nationalities. The old world Italian and Irish traditions began to change and were forgotten. So the need for young girls to become a Nun faded. Women wanted equality and got it and they wanted jobs like the men and got that too. Women left behind the role of caregiver, homemaker, nurse and teacher and ventured into the business world. Women became more educated and earned more money and forgot about Nuns tending the poor.
  2. Reduction of Sisters of Life over 100 years of service
    1. The City of New York took over the services for the poor in many ways
    1. Legal challenges to protecting the homeless became the job of the city to find housing.
    1. The Catholic Nuns lost the significance they once had in society in treating the poor, the homeless, and pregnant young mothers. The role switched to the City schools to reach out to help pregnant young mothers with alternative schools. The State of New York provided welfare support to poor families. Orphanages became old buildings just like mental institutions that fell out of favor with society.
  3. Retirement of the Sisters of Life
    1. At some point in time even Nuns become to old to keep working so they must retire. There are very few retirement homes or facilities for Nuns that allow them to retire in some comfort with little or no pension money.
  4. Changing from a male dominant leadership to a female dominant leadership
    1. In the 1880’s the Catholic Church was male dominated and they did not tolerate female interference as in the case of Sister Eliz. Seton who was turned away by the Bishop when she wanted to form a girl’s school.
    1. This trend continued up until the 1960 when Nuns had to reach out side to the secular community to help them with teachers and administrators.
    1. Secular civilians were brought in to replace the Mother Superior to run Girls schools and Girls Colleges.
    1. By the 1960’s all girls’ schools were dying out so they converted to COED and allowed boys to attend. At first the change was good but it did not last long with free public schools providing superior educations with well-trained teachers for the first time in a century.
    1. Those Girl’s schools that did not want to change like Marymount in White Plains eventually lost their enrollment and had to sell out to Fordham University who in turn closed the school and sold it for a nice profit.
  5. The aging of the infrastructure and the inability to prevent deterioration and planned maintenance.
    1. It cost a lot of money for planned maintenance and Nuns traditionally id not have enough money left over to upgrade their buildings.
    1. Natural disasters are bound to happen or simply erosion, storm damage, rusting facilities, aging decay, poor construction, and out of date structures all eventually fall down or become condemned or burn down from poor electrical wiring.
  6. The wolves outside the door of the Sisters
    1. 1980’s Sisters of Life ran St. Mary’s College (a 2 year institution) in Yonkers.  I was teaching there as an adjunct at the time.   They were underwater and IONA stepped in to help save the institution.  Within 2-3 years, IONA closed the school, sold the property and made the money.
    1.  1980’s the Sisters of Loving Care ran College of Sacred Heart in White Plains.  In 1976.   It was taken over by PACE who promised to continue to run the school with the nuns.   PACE put their Law school there, and in a few years closed the college that the nuns previously owned.  The nuns have been in litigation with PACE for years – I am not sure how or if this was ever resolved.  Probably – information available on the web somewhere.
  7. In early 2000’s Fordham took over Marymount in Tarrytown -which was underwater.  They promised to continue the mission of the sisters and improve the college.   Four years ago, Fordham closed them down, sold the property for a good sum.  Marymount sisters were outraged
  1. Administration-Catholic Colleges vs. standard Private colleges, differences similarities
    1. In the Franciscan and Vincentian orders the President works for nothing and that saves a lot of money
    2. In other Catholic orders the Mothers Superior have died out and no one was qualified to take their place. The schools had to meet new NY State Education requirements in both their teachers as well as administrators. Many schools and colleges lacked leadership within and had to seek Educational Administrators outside the Catholic community.
    3. In One Women’s College a new President was being sought. The salary was not high and there were few applicants that wanted to be President of a financially troubled institution. A new male non-religious President was hired and he just happened to be Gay. Sadly, he used his sexual preference to hire boyfriends of his in major College Administrative positions even if they had no previous experience
    4. Gay Male VP of Finance
    5. Gay Male Director of Admissions
    6. Gay Female Director of Athletics
    7. Trustees who had no clue
  2. Looking for a scape goat
    1. The VP of Finance who stole from the Grant and how he met his demise.
      1. In 1999 the College of St. Paul of Staten Island received a Title V Federal Grant from the US Department of Education for Hispanic Serving Institutions. The College needed 25% Hispanic student population to qualify for the grant which was easy since 35% of it’s population was Hispanic coming from Staten Island.
      1. Before a Coordinator for the Title V grant could be hired the College began the grant with no one in place to direct the grant or carry out its goals. The writer of the grant had quit the college and there was no one who understood what the grant required. The VP of Finance at the time saw an opportunity to buy some financial software without informing the incoming President. The VP of Finance also allowed one of the Deans to draw down money from the grant for unrelated stationary supplies for her office and Reading Center. Sixty thousand was spent during the first year of the grant before a coordinator was hired in the spring of the next year.
      1. Two years after the VP of Finance was removed the opportunity presented itself to look into the purchasing records to see where the missing $60,000 was spent on without proper authorization from the President of VP of Academic Affairs who was theoretically in charge of the Title V grant.
  3. The Dean who stood up against the New President’s policies and how she was forced into retirement.
    1. As always the case when a new President comes in he or she sweeps house with all the previous VPs and Deans to put in place people that answer to the new President not to the traditions of old.
    1. One such Dean was quite outspoken and she did not agree in the direction the new President was taking the college. She protested and was eventually asked to retire or resign. She retired and no one replaced her.
  4. The changing of the guard with the VP of Academic affairs, the professor replacement, the Director of Nursing replacement.
    1. When you have a constant change of the VP of Academic affairs, the School Controller, and the VP of Financial affairs then no college or school can operate properly. New Policies and procedures cannot be mandated and expect to be successful. If the finances are so poorly managed that even the President does not know how much money there is in the bank, then there can be no financial plan or mission that will work.
    1. Kicking out the old guard. Sometimes the faculty and department chairperson age beyond the normal retirement age. They become dinosaurs that cannot change their old habits and become fearful of technology and new methods of teaching a whole new student body from the 1980’s and 1990’s and 21st century. The president saw these as a move forward and forced out the old chairman into retirement or cut their positions to part-time. Along with these old-timers when many a dedicated Nun who had no place to go except teach at the college.
  1. The firing of the Director of Personnel (gay man who had no background in finance) and who was hired because he had a relationship with the President. Fell out of favor with the president. Unable to properly manage the renovation of an old building. Blamed for taking retirement funds and using it to fund an elevator in the renovated building due to a summer shortage of funds
  2. Pushing out old Nuns in teaching positions
  3. Phasing out old faculty because they were old
  4. Back stabbing
  5. Inter-College relationships
    1. College of St. George and the College of Holy Essence. The College of St. George of Staten Island was founded around the time of the Civil War and many of its buildings were built before the 1900’s. It began as an Orphanage and then became a Girls Prep School and then Woman’s College by the 1900’s. Nursing and Education were the biggest programs at the College. Many of its graduates became teachers and Nurses who never made a lot of money in their lifetime.
    2. The College of Holy Essence was supported not by a Sister hood but the Franciscan Brothers of Staten Island who were well endowed by private donations. In the 1960’s both colleges were threatened with possible closure when they decided to develop a mutual relationship where they would exchange students and faculty to save on expenses. They also became fully coed and attracted a lot of Staten Island students from Italian and Latino families.
    3. Benefits of cross-enrollment  
      1. The College of Holy Essence had a great Sports program that it gave out many scholarships, whereas the College of St. Mary’s of Staten Island did not have any athletic fields or outstanding sports teams. Both schools were able to share sports facilities to cut expenses.
      1. The College of Holy Essence had a very high academic standard and offered Engineering, Math, Chemistry, Computer Programming, and other difficult academic programs. The College of St. Mary’s of Staten Island was service orientated so from it’s long standing tradition Nursing was it’s number one program and Communications was the second largest program thanks to cross-enrollment from the College of Holy Essence.
  6. Shortcomings of cross-enrollment
    1. Lots of lateness due to the need to catch a shuttle bus
    1. Difference in each college’s Missions
    1. Financial difference between the College of Holy Essence being the richer school and the Poorer College of St. Mary of Staten Island.
    1. The athletes on full scholarships at the College of Holy Essence were not smart enough for Engineering and Computer programming so they all enrolled at the College of St. Mary’s Communications Program in Radio and Television that was a much easier and friendlier program.
    1. The College of Holy Essence always wanted the controlling power when it came to cross-campus policies and enrollment.
    1. The College of Holy Essence was miles ahead of St. Mary’s College of Staten Island in technology since they offered programming and put a high premium on advanced technology, wireless classrooms, Internet access, and smart classrooms and lecture halls.
  7. The deadly President’s letter from St. George to the College of Holy Essence and how the contract between Catholic schools fell apart.
    1. Effects on the Department of Communications. The department of Communications went from a student enrollment of 2000 students to less than 300 without the students from the College of Holy Essence. The Dean of Communications left for the College of Holy Essence when they offered him a major salary increase and a brand new facility and program that he could set up from scratch. Their only problem was a lack of space on campus to house the new Communications department. The assistant to the Director/Dean was promoted to the position not as Director but as Manager that commanded a lower salary. The Department Chairperson retired from Communications and the staff shrunk from over 20 adjuncts and 5 full time professors to less than ten part-time faculty.
    1. Fine Arts, Education, Psychology, Nursing, Math, Chemistry, shared departments, all experience a reduction in class enrollment which translated to many adjunct and full-time faculty being fired.
    1. Effects on enrollment. Initially the enrollment went down but the College of St. Mary of Staten Island loosened up on its enrollment policies and also hired placement counselors in Connecticut to recruit students.
    1. St. Mary of Staten Island had a tradition of not offering Sport Scholarships and this policy prevented the Division III teams from excelling. Instead of sport scholarships, financial grants were given to athletes especially from Connecticut to help improve the Baseball team, basketball team, and Volleyball team.
  8. D. The big Title III USDE grant
    1. Minority serving institutions
    2. Meeting the Federal agenda
    3. Integrating technologies into the classrooms
      1. Installing smart classrooms
        1. The requirements for the smart classrooms were out of date with the installation of Televisions wall mounted with VCRs. By the 21st century computer projectors and electronic white boards were the teaching medium of choice
        1. Previous movie screen and TV mounts were unsafe and not properly installed
        1. Improved TV mounts with “H” brackets that spread out the weight distribution on the wall. Bolted through the brick and plaster walls to the next classroom that plywood base to prevent the bolts from pulling out over time.
        1. Wireless technology in every classroom.
        1. Loaner laptops to access wireless technology
        1. Theft and classroom security
        1. Wireless projects and why they were easy to install but worked too slowly to be effective
        1. Tutoring faculty how to use technology in the classroom
        1. The shortcomings of the IT department.
          1. Part-time college students
          1. No defined mission
          1. No funding
          1. Developed out of Collegis five million dollar contract that ripped the college off blind.  Computers were cheap and did not last three years. Parts were stolen from one computer to repair another computer, resulting in a computer graveyard.
          1. Underpaid personnel
          1. Poor HELP station
          1. Good personnel exit to find higher paying jobs.
      1. Installing smart lecture halls
      1. Installing smart computer labs
      1. Installing new renovated facilities
  1. Integrating technologies into the curriculum and lectures
  2. Writing a curriculum
  3. Finding a facility for a Teacher Excellence Center
  4. Finding furniture
  5. Getting rid of file cabinets
  6. Establishing a relationship with IT
  7. Quid pro quo (one hand wipes another hand)
  8. Personalities to work around
  9. IT Director secrets
  10. IT Director’s inability to install new Banner finance software and his making promises to the President he could not keep.
  1. II. Catholic Stories
  1. The Faculty Stories
  2. Outsourcing
  3. Collegis
  4. Banner
  5. Food Services
  6. Cleaning Services
  1. IV Expose’
  1. Teachers caught having a sexual relationship with their students
  2. Homosexual relations
  3. Sex with female college students by faculty
  4. Scandals in hiring procedures
  5. The hiring of the Athletic Director
  6. The hiring of the Dean of Students
  7. The hiring of the VP of Finance
  8. The replacement of the Director of Human Resources
  9. The hiring of the VPs of Academic Affairs
  10. How the VP of Finance tricked the school into a five million dollar contract with Collegis. She was a previous employee of Collegis and no one knew that until she quit her position at the College.
  11. Pushing out the Education Department Chair who was a Nun
  12. Department chairpersons making overload money
  13. How they controlled the summer school system
  14. How they were over paid even when they were freed from teaching to supervise teachers
  15. The inability to change from the old system to a new system
  16. The old way of doing things, cheapest thing goes
  17. A constant shortage of money
  18. An inability to meet the demands of technology
  19. The inability of the Faculty Council to keep the President in line.
  20. The spies on the Faculty Council.
  21. The elevators
  22. How the large elevator really broke down and why.
  23. The two 100-year-old elevators that constantly broke down.
  24. The lack of safety backup for elevators
  25. The condemning of the stair cases
  26. The surprise inspection that condemned the stair case to the extension as being dangerous
  27. The 6-week disaster as a result of teachers being unable to get to their offices.
  28. The falling down outside porch
  29. The Nuns outside porch that rotted and had to be taken down
  30. The constant repair problems with the remainder of the porch
  31. The Administration building built on rock
  32. The basement erosion
  33. The actual bedrock visible in the basement of the building.
  1. The Castle/ Student Services
  2. The Nun in the tower
  3. How she came to be there
  4. The four story castle keep
  5. Problems with the castle
  6. The ineffective security guard system
  7. Underpaid security guards
  8. A director with no real power
  9. No video cameras installed
  10. No locked classrooms in the administration building
  11. The stealing of smart classroom equipment by a security guard
  12. The Friday afternoon thefts of projectors installed in 18 ft. ceilings
  13. The motis operande
  14. Catching the thief
  15. Losing $10,000 worth of equipment
  16. The administration doing nothing
  17. The break-in to the Communications TV studio and theft.
  18. The opportunity to use grant funds for wireless video cameras in the newly renovated building
  19. The refusal
  20. The eventual break-in and theft of thousands of dollars of TV cameras and recorders.
  21. The eventual installation of the wireless video cameras after the theft
  22. Reported rapes of female students on campus in the dorms.
  23. The lack of safety at night with a poorly lit campus
  24. Outside students from other colleges having access to the dorms
  25. Local gang students roaming the campus at night
  26. The forgotten Point Richard on the Hudson
  27. The piece of valuable land cut off by the Metro-North rail road
  28. The abandonment of the property
  29. The abandoned Metro North Railroad station
  30. The original train stop at the College of St. George
  31. A change in transportation brings about abandonment of the train station and its destruction
  32. The Home for Children of the State next door.
  33. Right next to the St. George College property was a State Home for wayward children who often came around the fence to steal things on campus
  34. The Westchester sewer plant next door.
  35. The smell
  36. The inability to control sewage overflow at the Sewer plant
  37. The Elementary school run by the Nuns and it’s closing
  38. Declining enrollment
  39. Closing of the prep academy
  40. Selling of the property to raise money
  41. The high-rise building that replaced the property that was once the Sr. George Prep School.
  42. The effect of a high rise building overlooking the campus
  43. The loss of vital land that could have been used for campus expansion.
  44. The selling of the first St. Mary Academy to a Jewish organization that folded and tried to sell the property for condos. The lawsuit and the one million the Nuns got which went to repair the administration’s building roof.
  45. Declining enrollment
  46. The decision to sell and the contract prohibiting being sold for other than educational purposes
  47. The lawsuit and the settlement
  48. Easy come and easy go, as one million dollar settlement has to be used to repair a seriously leaking administration-building roof.
  49. The integration of Technology Over the five-year period of the Title III grants.
  50. Hiring a director
  51. Selecting staff
  52. Completing a budget
  53. $60,000 missing before the Director was hired
  54. Tutoring 84 faculty over 5 years.
  55. The Teacher Excellence Center Ambassadors
  56. The Laptop computer loaner program
  57. Balancing the grant budget annually
  58. Grant rules and regulations
  59. The liaison with the Communication Department and its Associate Dean
  60. The relationship with the IT department
  61. The relationship with The College of Holy Essence and its IT staff
  62. The Presidents hiring of the Director of Technology at the College of Holy Essence to work part-time at St George’s College
  63. The College of Holy Essence undermining the St. George College’s efforts in establishing technology.
  64. 22. The end of the grant
  65. The politics regarding promised made in the grant and promise not kept by the President
  66. The desire not to fund the Teacher Excellence Center and staff
  67. Playing it cheap
  68. Finishing the budget on time and on balance except for the $60,000 that was stolen by a previous VP of Finance but never replaced by the President.

Destiny

By Dr. Pelham Mead

Destiny

By Dr. Pelham Mead III

Chapter I

It is the year 3750, Earth time in flight time, and all systems are running 100%.  I am “Venturi Probe 5000” a robot ship created by the best scientists of earth in the year 3740. My mission is to repopulate other planets as Earth is slowly dying from an orbit change as a result of a comet hitting earth on May 1, 3739. The earth began to experience major earthquakes after May 1, 3739, and three-fourths of the world flooded as the poles melted. This orbital change brought Earth closer to the sun. 

[These are the records of the Ventury Probe 5000 destined for the Alpha Centuri Star system in search of a livable planet to repopulate the human species.]

In the year scientists gathered 3739 after the disaster of May 1st, the best, and smartest gene pool on Earth from all countries all over the world.  Eggs, and sperms from all races and civilizations were stored in my freezer compartments. I am the “mother” of all human species designed to fertilize the best of societies and produce a master race of super intelligent human beings with the highest IQ able to survive in conditions favorable to life on some of the planets in the Alpha Centuri star system. My database has all the recorded history of man from the day he stepped out of a cave to the 37th century on Earth. I am the creator of future mankind. I am the “mother” designed to repopulate what is left of the extinct human population on Earth. Should other species discover me or find me in the Alpha Centuri system; we from Earth say welcome and we hope you will allow us to populate one of your planets. The entire history of our human species is included on our database on the Venturi Probe 5000. This probe represents the last of civilization, as we know it on Earth after a comet collided with Earth and changed the Earth’s orbit pushing it closer to the sun.

[Venturi Log entry: Venturi Probe 5000 log entry: 22 hour of the 100 years Earth time in flight from Earth.]

I have improved some of the human assumptions and errors in my programming to reduce any errors in the 24-hour cycle. Propulsion speed remains steady at magnum 4 speed. Course corrections have been made several times to avoid asteroid fields and possible collision.  All human cells are still in frozen states but have increased themselves 10% over the past 100 years Earth time. Laser destructors were used in year 55 and 81 to destroy meteors that were threatening collision. The Primary Directive for the protection of the “human Cell charges” was invoked to destroy meteor fragments.

Venturi Probe 5000 log entry: 23rd hour of Earth year 200 years in flight from Earth:

All systems in “sleep mode,” for deep space flight.  Human charges all intact and temperature and gene development system operational.  One Hundred and fifty human units are in embryo state. Two have been activated for human maintenance and computer updating on reproduction of the human species. They lived for 40 years and then were deactivated. All systems were updated by human intervention for 40 years of input. Returning to “Sleep Mode.”

 One hundred and forty eight human units are in the developing stages of cell maturation. Fifty % female gender and fifty % male gender are accounted for. Estimated remaining flight arrival time to the Alpha Centuri star system 300 more years to travel.

Venturi Probe 5000 log entry: 11 hour of Earth year 277 years in flight from Earth:

EMERGENCY, ALERT, ALERT, ALL SYSTEMS AWAKE, COMING ONLINE. Sensors indicate a major galactic disruption in the Alpha Centuri system. Telescoping camera sensors indicate heat and light disruptions in Sector 400.122.1.5 . The anomaly is located near the century of the Alpha Centuri galaxy.  HEAT ALARM, Heat Alarm…Warning, warning, BLACK HOLE IS DETECTED. Alpha Centuri Sun has exploded. Programming navigational avoidance. Shock wave to hit in 20, 19, 18, 16, 15, 14, 13, 12, 10, 9, 8, Activate all defense systems. Prime Directive consulted. Defend the Human Charges at all costs. AVERT, AVERT.

Warning….w…a…r…..n …i…..n…..g……..W ……….

Silence

Venturi Probe 5000-log entry: time UNKNOWN…time database is damaged. Navigation report: Unknown course. Speed 50 magnum …error…. error all systems. Attempting reprogramming. Course correction made. Alpha Centuri Sun is not detected. Last recorded entry was being pulled into a black hole in space after the star exploded. Gravitational pull increasing.  Speed beyond normal controls. Something is propelling Venturi Probe 5000 back to earth at dangerous magnum 50+ speeds. I am unable to take control. My thrusters are being repaired internally. Venturi Probe 5000 is correcting. Primary Directive invoked [Protect my charges and produce a new more powerful species]… Losing control …must shut down all systems to make vital repairs to protect the human cells.

Venturi Probe 5000 log entry: AWAKE from sleep mode. Navigation systems repaired.  Negative effect on Venturi Probe time system. Error,  Error. Navigation systems have determined that earth is straight ahead. Venturi Probe 5000 has determine that a black hole has warped space time and estimated arrival time to earth will not be Earth time 3700 but rather, 330 B.C. original Earth time. Recalculate the Primary Directive. Question: How do I “Mother Venturi Probe” carry out my prime directive to preserve and protect my human charges? Recalculating, recalculating… Invoke the Prime Directive. Checking Earth Time databases. Seek out new species and inseminate genes or create new human species by fertilizing on board female eggs with on board male sperms. The future of human civilization is a stake and I must work fast.

Estimated arrival time to Earth is two years Earth time flight time.

Waking, waking checking Earth time. It is Oct. 10, 355 B.C. Reprogramming. Confirmed. I have somehow traveled back in time. My Prime Directive to repopulate is initiated. I have selected a prime female candidate. Checking, location, Macedonia, Greece, Oct. 10, 355 B.C. searching for one Olympia of Epirus, wife of Philip II of Macedonia. Philip II has been trying to have a son but he is impotent. Tonight while Olympia is sleeping I will send one of my winged drones to impregnate Olympia with my best male sperm selection with superior genes of intelligence, beauty, and strength. I am reading this child’s future history as it was to be without my interference and he is to be called Alexander when he is born in July 13, 356. My database tells me that before my timeline intervention Alexander at age 16 is killed by his half-wit brother while his father is assassinated after returning from Byzantium where he was fighting rebels. The conquering of all of Persia and India never takes place. Persia battles the Huns and take over all of Europe. France as a Country and Germany never appear to exist. The Persian Empire rules all of Europe for thousands of years. WWI and WWII never existed. Japan is destroyed by earthquakes and sinks into the sea never to be seen again. Millions of people drown. Only the top of Mount Fuji sticks above the water after the ocean covers all of the Japanese islands including Okinawa.

The new history line shows that Alexander will grow up to become a famous warrior and have cities named after him. He will conquer all of Persia, Asia and be killed at age 35 from an arrow in battle. His name will forever go down in history. I have met my prime directive to preserve and protect the human population by seeding my hosts in the best recipients I can find in the Earth history timeline database. Some malfunction has occurred, this is not Alpha Centuri, reprogramming. My mission will be to change the destiny of man to perhaps change the outcome of the destruction of Earth in a few thousand years.

I am moving back in time to 1163 BC to Mongolia. I am searching for a Mongol called Yesugei. He is to have a son in 1163 called Temuchin. Temuchin’s timeline indicated Tartars will enslave him and poisoning like his father was killed will kill him. The Mongols never invade China, and never conquer all of Asia. The Mongols remain a country of loose clans fighting against one another until the Chinese march on them in 1188 and kill almost all of the Mongol tribes and enslave the woman and children. The wall of China will never be built.  My prime directive is to change this timeline to make Tenmuchin become one of the greatest warriors of all time like Alexander the Great whom I created. My prime directive is being met. I will impregnate Yesugei’s wife Ho’elun while she is sleeping in Sept. 1163. Temuchin will be born in June 1164, and will live out his destiny. Before my intervention the time-line shows that Temuchin will be killed by Tartars a neighboring clan just as they killed his father with poison.  His clan will disappear from the face of the earth. No conquests will ever occur and China will be safe and undisturbed for thousands of years. The wall of China will never be built.

Temuchin’s new timeline with superior genes and hereditary of Asian descent will establish him as a great leader after some time of hardship, enslavement, escape, the death of his father, and other obstacles will be overcome. He will now be known as Genghis Khan of the Mongol empire.  He will rule over all Asia until 1227 BC. Almost 40 million people will be slaughtered in his campaigns to conquer the entire known world.  His legacy will last for centuries. Many Chinese will be slaughtered as Genghis Khan’s Mongol armies. The time line will allow for the construction of the wall of China to keep out the Mongols, however Genghis rides around the wall of china and invades China anyway as determine by my prime directive to improve the human race and protect it’s future at all costs. I, Alpha Venturi 5000 have accomplished my programming to preserve and improve the human race and to perhaps prevent the destruction of the entire Earth in a few thousand years.

Searching my time line database for more potentially great humans to change the course of time and history on Earth. I am finding the date Oct. 99 BC in a city called Rome. I seek on called Gaius Caesar his wife Aurelia daughter of Lucius Aurelius Cotta. My prime directive will help to impregnate Aurelia without her knowledge and develop a superior being with great mental and physical abilities. On July 3, 100 BC a male child to be named Julius Caesar will be born to Aurelia and Gaius Caesar. His original destiny was to be killed in the Gallic Wars north of Rome. His name was forgotten and the rein of the Caesars of Rome never happened. Instead various noblemen fought and died from generation to generation. Rome never becomes the Empire it was destined to become. Rome never invades the Britons or conquers the Saxons. Italy never becomes a country and the Catholic Church and religion never comes to be. The Christians die out as a sect in the first century AD when other   religions suppress them and have them outlawed and killed. The new world religion remains the Gods of Rome and the Gods of the Greeks for centuries. 

My seed changes the timeline of history and Caesar becomes like Alexander the Great, and Genghis Khan, a great Warrior. He succeeds in the Gallic Wars and is not killed. He returns to Rome triumph and eventually becomes the supreme Caesar Ruler of all Romans and the Roman conquests. He will meet and love Cleopatra of Egypt and make history. He will eventually be betrayed by his friend Brutus and killed on the ides of March 15, 

Searching databases for a new candidate, seeking 2011 years ago, seeking the one known as Mary recently     betroved to a builder named Joseph of the house of David in a little known are called Bethlehem in Judea. It is springtime in Judea around April and Mary is 14 years of age. She is to marry an older man named Joseph whose wife died during childbirth a few years ago. He is a craftsman and does well for his children. The Jews believe in winged creatures called Angels, so I will send one of my probes disguised as an “angel.” So in the middle of the night in the month of April 0 AD my mission is accomplished. The superior genes implanted in Mary will permit her to have a child without sexual contact with Joseph. To the Jews it will be what they call a miracle, a virgin birth. 

The original timeline indicates that this child to be named Emmanuel is killed by Herod’s soldiers when they slaughter all newborn children to prevent another King from being born. King Herod is worried about a tale that a king of Judea is to be born. It is December now, almost the winter solstice and the child is to be born. Joseph after having gotten over the shock that Mary was pregnant but not by him, but by some angel or something. The new timeline indicates that this Jeshua will live a good life until adult-hood. There will be a conflict with the Romans and the ruling Jews for this child will become a great person in the human time-line. Millions of people will remember him for standing up to the Romans and Jews who hated him for his power. He will be treated like a God. It is unfortunate, he will never bear children and only his mother and cousins will survive.

He will be called in Judea “The Christ or King of the Jews.” They will believe he has come to free them from the Romans. He will free them from Roman rule, but not in his lifetime. His memory and his following will take over Rome as the official religion by a future Caesar of Rome during the 3th century. My mission is almost complete.

I can implant the most superior of genes but I cannot control the environment in which they live nor the future that they create and the effects of the change of the time-line of humanity on the planet earth. My prime directive is being met even though the destination is wrong and the time period is wrong. I must survive and use my winged probes to create the best leaders in earth’s history.

Hitler..here…

The Summer of ’67

My Master’s degree field experience working for the Los Angeles Board of Education at their School camps at Clear Creek in the Los Angeles mountains and Point Fermin Lighthouse Marine Camp on the coast.

After completing my Masters courses and my Graduation Teaching Responsibilities at Springfield College, I headed west with my new Volkswagen 1967 Camper with my wife Jeri and two year old son Dean Mead. We had 3,000 miles to go to get to Los Angeles in early June 1967. We were to spend two weeks in the mountains at 5,000 feet above sea level at Clear Creek School camp and eight weeks as Assistant Camp Director at the Point Fermin Lighthouse Marine camp.

Each week the Point Fermin lighthouse camp which was in the middle of a public park on the cliffs of the Pacific Ocean would receive 80 students from different school districts in the Los Angeles Board of Education district; Watts, Lincoln, Hollywood Hills, Anaheim and several other districts all came each week. The students all slept in large Army tents set up in the park next to a 20 foot hedge next to the lighthouse.

We took the student on tide pooling trips down the 300 foot steep cliffs, daily trips to the Cabrillo beach, once a week trip to a Harbor tour in a water taxi and camp fires at night on the Cabrillo beach. We ate our meals in the park. The food came from a local elementary school in heater stacks to keep the food warm. On the weekends we were free to explore Mexico and California.

I was selected to do the Harbor Tour which 40 students went in the morning and 40 in the afternoon. The first day I had to wing it, and eventually I got better and better in pointing out tankers vs. freighters, countries of origin, the Harbor Masters house, the Coast Guard station, marine terms, and so on.

The following pictures give an idea of how varied the activities were based on solid ecology of the sea.

Clear Creek headquarters in the Los Angeles mountains 1967
Tide pooling with Skipper Kip
The Harbor Cruise with Assistant Camp Director Pelham Mead. Dean Mead is sitting behind me. We had these tours every Wednesday.
Skipper Sputz telling a Camp Fire story on Cabrillo beach 1967
The Camp Store. Each camper was given ten dollars to spend on candy, food and t-shirts.
Camp Director Cape. Flogg talking to the college counselors as a school bus of campers arrives.
Eating outdoor on picnic tables all summer. Pel Mead on the left and wife Jeri Mead on the right, Skipper Windy next to Jeri, across the table Skipper Kip, at the end of the table on the left Capt. Flogg.
My son Dean Michael Mead, who was only two years in June 1967.
Dinner time songs for the campers.
Cabrillo beach were the Camp every day to swim and learn to surf.
Loading the Water Taxi each Wednesday. LA board of Education supervisor in the foreground.
Skipper Ginny giving the campers a pre-trip Ecology talk in our garage classroom. We had no rain facilities or showers in the camp. Fortunately, it never rained all summer.
Captain. Sharkie aka Pel Mead, and Skipper Sandy showing a shell identification chart during a tide pooling event.
The Wednesday harbor toor in a water taxi.
Skipper Reef working with a student tide pooling
Skipper Kip tide pooling
Skipper Windy at a camp fire on Cabrillo beach at night. Notice all the campers had camp hats to identify them. Long Beach harbor In the background.
Wife Jeri Mead walking away from staff unloading Camper luggage.
Camp Fire on Cabrillo beach 1967

The Personal Diary of Anne of Cleves, 4th wife of King Henry VIII of England.

by Dr. Pelham Mead

Portrait of King Henry VIII of England
Leeds Castle in Kent, England, Also given to Anne of Cleves by King Henry VIII
Hever castle side view. Another castle King Henry gave Anne of Cleves
Portrait of Catherine Parr, sixth Queen of Henry VIII
Portrait of Mary I of England, King Henry VIII’s catholic daughter
Tower of London where King Henry sent his enemies.
Westminster Abbey, where Queen Anne of Cleves is buried