The History of the Templar Knights from the viewpoint of a young templar Squire

Templar ship
Templar Ship
Templar knights
The banner for the Templar Knights a red cross on a white background, approved by the Pope

On the night of Oct. 12, 1307, fifty templar knights, sergeants, squires, pages and craftsman fled Paris with their wives, children and family on 18 galleons anchored on the Seine river in Paris, France. The next day the King of France had Jacques de Molay and all of the Templar Knights in Paris and all of France arrested and thrown in jail. He had hoped to steal the 220 tons of treasure the Templars had but he found nothing. Instead fifty templars were sailing to Spain and Scotland at the time since they left in the middle of the night before with all the treasure. To this day no one knows where all the treasure went or was buried. History does record that the Templar Knights that sailed to Scotland financed Robert the Bruce’s campaign against the English with new swords, armor, horses, and lances from the brother Templars in Ireland. Previously, Robert the Bruce did not have enough money to properly outfit his Scottish armies. The deciding battle at Bannonbock on June 24th was supported by the surviving Templar Knights crushing the English trapped between two rivers. The Templar treasure was hidden on an island off of Ireland and many caves and castles around Scotland. Eventually, with many treasure hunters seeking the Templar fortune and the Kings of England and France as well as the Pope, the Templars fled to the New World, “Nova Scotia,” and established a colony there free from the reach of the Pope.

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